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Old Oct 28, 2002, 10:30 AM   #1
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Default Auto exposure problems

I have taken several hundred pictures with my new 7i and I am still trying to get used to its idiosyncrasies. Having already resigned myself to the problematic auto focus, I now find that I canít depend on auto exposure. I would be very grateful to hear from other D7xx owners who have had experience with other brands of digital cameras, as have I, and find that auto exposure often misses badly. Too many of my shots, with the 7i, end up with high lights that are completely blown out but still lacking shadow detail. My unit seems to have a tendency to over expose while at the same time exhibiting too much contrast, making shadows problematic. I havenít had this experience with my Olympus models, or my Canon camcorder. Before spending hours experimenting with exposure and contrast compensation, please let me know of your experiences and solutions.

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Old Oct 28, 2002, 11:11 AM   #2
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Can you post some examples of the problem so we can help? Are you shooting in the 'P' program mode?
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Old Oct 28, 2002, 12:01 PM   #3
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if you shoot between the hours of 12 and 3 in the afternoon on a nice sunny day the sun casts serious dark shadows on objects and peopled. that mucks with meters. pop up the flash which is i hope set for fill and it might make a difference. the if you meter for highlight any shadow will be black. meter for shadow and you'll blow the highlights into the next dimension. the D7 series has a spotmeter try metering the shadow and highlights of the image. see how many stops difference there is. if you start going mor tha 2 stops your i trouble.

this is an example of that issue. this is not a work of art.

http://www.pbase.com/image/4337386

note the backround is bright meters like light. the first image i took metered the bright backround beautifully. the bow of the boat was dark as night along with the rocks because they were in shade. i popped up the fill flash and shot again got a fairly even exposure then probably could have bracked down the strobe a 1/2 stop and then again another 1/2 and chose the best of the three. but it was just a fun shot saved by the strobe.

the basic laws of photography stiil exist for digital. you take the picture in the long run not the camera.
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Old Oct 28, 2002, 1:20 PM   #4
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Default Thanks all

I have been a moderately serious amateur for over forty years and I understand the problems associated with metering in situations like you describe. Even so, experience tells me that my film EOS Elan or my digital Olympus would do a better job of handling the contrasts in lighting. Sorry I don't have any images to post since I get rid of the bad ones right away to save disk space. But the situations are usually as you describe with a sunny day and shadows. For instance, Yesterday I shot some pix at a friends wedding out doors in a garden. The bride and groom were in the mid day sun and we were with others in OPEN shade. Even though I was focussing on the bride and groom. They were badly over exposed on most shots while the spectators looked likie they were in very deep shade. At the very least I would expect the B&G to be pretty well exposed, and hopefully see more shadow detail on the spectators.

Any way the main thrust of my question was to ask if others with digital camera experience were finding D7xx problematic with exposure compared to their other cameras and to ask what they have done to compensate. I think that mine pretty regularly over exposes in many situations and I am going to try creating a memory setting with a more negative exposure value.

By the way I am using P mode and I know that stands for "Pray" as one poster has stated. But I use it because it is a valuable setting for candid photography. when having to switch from scene to scene rapidly.
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Old Oct 28, 2002, 1:24 PM   #5
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u can use real-time histogram to check if it is the bad lighting condistion or camera problem.
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Old Oct 28, 2002, 1:53 PM   #6
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Exactly! zhu001 summed it all up... Check the real-time histogram before the shot is taken. Or use the manual WYSIWYG mode you can't go wrong here!

The brides usually have very bright outfit that tend to fool the "Pray" mode on most cameras, especially in strong midday sun (and the groom has the opposite effect since he's mostly dark)... You've got the worst case of both highlight and shadow in one shot... In the shade would be better (or use reflector panels).
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Old Oct 28, 2002, 4:49 PM   #7
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I undeleted several of the problem pix. Now, where can I post them so you all can see what I am talking about? DPR is out because I have been unsucessful at registering with them for over a week now.
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Old Oct 28, 2002, 5:26 PM   #8
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www.pbase.com
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Old Oct 28, 2002, 5:32 PM   #9
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you just demonstrated one of the biggest issues in wedding photography. the white wedding dress. you must be very careful in this situation. it's almost a guarenteed over exp. you better bracket the shots.

i was just reading the kodak reference the other day on their ERI-JPEG technology. you know what they use for a reference photo, a blown out wedding picture

http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...ensation.jhtml

you have to compensate for the white dress. your meter sees white and trys to make it WHITE. it does't see detail. then it sees the darker areas way over 2 stops difference there. it is a classic situation. you have to cut it back a notch or 2 that even goes for film cameras. bracket bracket bracket.
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Old Oct 28, 2002, 6:40 PM   #10
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OK Here is the link to the pictures. I think they actually look better in the Galllery than when I viewd them directly. Even so, some things to note:

The gown is not white as it appears, but fairly beige collored

Notice how overexposed the tight shot of the groom alone is

http://www.pbase.com/charlibob/inbox
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