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Old Aug 26, 2005, 1:05 PM   #11
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Takeshi wrote:
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And do You think that also the image quality aspect is a personal opinion or between these cameras is there an evident difference under this aspect ?
You're going to see differences in image processing between cameras (even if they use the same sensor). Each manufacturer is going to approach things like metering, color saturation, contrast, white balance, in camera sharperningand JPEG processing a little differently.

In better light, the differences between cameras is usually not very obvious.

Image quality is always subjective. I'd look at the samples here, as well as in online albums you'll find.

One good source is http://www.pbase.com/cameras

You can select a camera model and find user albums with photos from it.

Keep in mind that lighting conditions have a huge iimpact on the images (as does the photographers' skill). Unless you're comparing the same photos, taken in the same conditions, using the same camera settings, it can be difficult to judge which model did better.


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Old Aug 26, 2005, 2:24 PM   #12
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I've read some reviews and have seen some photo onhttp://www.imaging-resource.com/WB/WB.HTM?view=6(Very good site).

The Konicaseems to beamong the best compact 6 mp camera (With Fuji F10).
I' ve compared these camera's photos but... I'm a novice and truly I'm not sure on which get the best... under the colour aspect I prefer the Konica but I'm not able to evaluate the other parameters...

:O
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Old Aug 26, 2005, 3:07 PM   #13
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I do not believe that the Sony is in the same category as the 600 for picture quality, functionality and usefulness. I briefly owned the Sony and found it to have picture quality issues - softness on edges, distortion at each end of the zoom, and pictures that were ok but had much less detail than the W-1 and much less than the 600. I paid 229.00 at Ritz for the 600 and the Sony sells for around the same price in PA in most of the retail places I visit. The battery life in the Sony was very average for my needs. I also had trouble holding the camera without getting my fingers on the lens. The 600 is a camera that you can productively use for years to come because it has a megapixel size that seems to work well with its sensor and it is "fast" enough that "lag" is not a real factor. As Jim says the review magnification and speed of movement in the 600 allows for useful checking of image sharpness. I also have found that if I really want sharp pictures I will turn off the lcd and use the viewfinder braced against my face. As funny as it may seem that simple bracing of the camera allows me to shoot at lower speeds without noticeable blurr issues. I have tried many of the "newest" camera and find that for my use that I prefer the pictures that this 600 takes over the quality of the Casio 750. It just does 6 megs so very well. I think this camera is a "sleeper" that did not get the proper recognition as a very well rounded pocket camera that you don't need to replace in a year or two. Another good camera that is currently in the same price range is the Nikkon 5200 - but for my tastes it lacks the sharpness of detail and manual controls of the 600.
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Old Aug 26, 2005, 4:06 PM   #14
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sfk:

If you haven't figured this out yet, the G600 has the ability to do some customization (for example: changing how many options appear under your controller keys).

These are my standard tips for Konica KD-510z/Minolta G500 owners (copied from an old forum post). But, they'd also apply to the G600:

The Konica's lens is rated at F2.8/F4.9 (typical for a subcompact model). So, more than twiceas much light can reach the sensor when shooting at wide angle.

So, try to shoot at wide angle whenever possible if indoors in low light (because what is bright to the human eye is not to the camera's lens).

This will greatly extend focus range/accuracy and flash range in low light. Also, when less flash is needed, it "throttles down" the output. This speeds up recycle times considerably. BTW, if you aren't getting focus lock, take the photo anyway. They generally come out pretty nice this way (the focus lock light is not reliable and Depth of Field is pretty good with a small sensored model).

Customizing the Controller keys:

You can setup the camera so that you rarely need to use the menus. Basically, just turn everything on under the Custom Menu. Here's how:

Press the Menu Button, and go to Setup, Custom.

You'll see a list of icons. Select each one, and turn all choices in submenus ON.

This turns on the Continuous Mode feature (and you can leave it that way all the time) -- allowing faster repeat photos, by holding down the shutter button since it won't refocus and remeter between frames.

Then, frequently used features are under the Controller Keys and you'll have this:

Left: switches between landscape, macro, self timer modes, including fixed focus choices (1m, 2m, 4m, etc.). You'll find that leaving it on the 2m focus choice works great for indoors where light is not always good enough for Autofocus. Thanks to tremendous Depth of Field with a small sensored model, you'll find just about everything within the flash range will be acceptably sharp this way if you don't use any zoom.

Right: switches between different flash modes

Up: allows you to set Exposure Compensation using left and right keys

Down: allows you to change White Balance Settings.

This gives you very fast access to exposure compensation, white balance, focus distances and flash modes without using the menus.

Turn it all on. Then, use it for a while, then go back into the Custom Menu, and turn off choices you don't use (so that only frequently used choices are toggled between when pressing a specific key).

You can allow or deny specific flash modes from appearing as a choice when using the right arrow key to toggle between them.

You can allow or deny focus choices from appearing -- even including (or excluding) macro, landscape, 1m, 2m, 4m from appearing as a toggle choice when the left controller key is pressed.

With everything turned on, you also get Autoexposure Lock with a half press of the shutter and a press of the up arrow; or Autofocus lock with a half press of the shutter and a press of the left arrow.

These virtually eliminate shutter lag when enabled (AF lock, AE lock). These will stay locked, until you either change the zoom settings, or disable them (in the same way that you enabled them).

Also, make sure to turn Quick View off (Setup, QuickView). This reduces lag time some, since it won't display the last photo taken for as long.

BTW, the camera defaults to Normal vs. Fine JPEG compression. This allows more photos on the Memory Card.

If you want the absolute best quality, simply change the mode to Fine (under the Resoluton Menu) instead.

If you don't like the front panel LED's, you can turn them off by going to Setup, Sounds; and turning off "Beep".

Also, make sure you hold the camera in a way that you don't have your right middle finger near the light sensor (small hole on front of camera). This will cause the flash to throttle down causing underexposed photos.

If you don't already own an image editing package, you may want to download the free irfanview from http://www.irfanview.com (make sure to download the free plug-ins too).

I generally shoot with Redeye Reduction turned off (I think that redeye reduction modes can spoil the photos, since the preflash used can change facial expressions).

To use irfanview to reduce redeye, zoom in on an eye using the + key. I usually zoom into to around 100%. Then, use your mouse to select the area around the red (square box).

Then, the redeye reduction menu choice will work. However, I usually don't use it this way. A better way is using the Effects, Effects Browser Menu Choice. You'll see redeye correction there, too. The difference is that you can change the amount applied. You'll see a before and after box to help you determine how much is needed.

A couple of more comments on the camera's setup:

You'll see a "Slow Shutter Menu". This menu controls the slowest allowable shutter speed for Autoexposure (with separate settings for Flash, and non-Flash (or Night Portrait) flash modes.

The camera defaults to a 1/60 second shutter speed for flash photos (which it speeds up, as zoom is used). It will prefer the flash setting you set here. I usually leave mine set to a slower shutter speed to pick up more ambient light with flash.

The second setting you see under the Slow Shutter Settings menu is for the slowest allowable shutter speed without flash. It defaults to 1/8 second. If you want to take night photos using a tripod, you may want to change this to 1 second (shown as 1/1). This will allow a slower shutter speed, while still using the camera's autoexposure (so that you don't have to use manual exposure instead, as long as exposures no longer than 1 second are needed). Longer than 1 second and you'll still need to use manual exposure.

It doesn't hurt to leave the second setting set slower (since it will automatically increase shutter speeds in better light anyway)

In less than optimum lighting outdoors, you may want to change the ISO speed to ISO 100 or higher under the Quality Menu via a User Profile (to get faster shutter speeds to help reduce blur).

This model defaults to ISO 50 with flash forced off. Anymore, my camera is set to ISO 200 more often than not. ISO 200 cleans up pretty nicely with Noiseware (and gives you faster shutter speeds in less than optmum lighting).

One more tip... to enter playback mode, you don't need to open the camera cover -- simply press the play button for about 2 seconds with the cover closed and it will come on in playback mode.


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Old Aug 26, 2005, 6:36 PM   #15
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Takeshi wrote
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The Konicaseems to beamong the best compact 6 mp camera (With Fuji F10).
I' ve compared these camera's photos but... I'm a novice and truly I'm not sure on which get the best... under the colour aspect I prefer the Konica but I'm not able to evaluate the other parameters...

:O
The Fuji F10 is in a class by itself right now if you need existing light photos without a flash. It can shoot at much higher ISO speeds compared to other compact cameras.

So, in conditions where you'd need to use a flash or tripod with a camera like the Minolta, you might be able to use a camera like the F10 without one (depending on the lighting, and if you don't use too much zoom). So, I'd take that into consideration if the F10 is also on your list.


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Old Aug 27, 2005, 3:53 PM   #16
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The two cameras are in a difference price range (200 euro for Konica and 350 for the F10). For my budget the Fuji is out. I'd only like to know if in terms of image quality (Outdoor in particular) there is an evident difference or not.
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Old Aug 27, 2005, 4:37 PM   #17
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For outdoor use, I think you'd be very pleased with the KM G600compared to anything else init's price range.

These little cameras have a sharp lens and take nice photos.


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Old Aug 31, 2005, 2:45 PM   #18
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Only my opinion !I had a g 600 last year and had some problems , Jim knows everything worth knowing about these models, i also bought a konica 510 same as jims and related to the g600, he also knows about the LENS problem i had, and told me he had heard of other G family models , that also had the lens sticking out / not retracting problem i had , Got an error 42 on the screen, like some canon A 80/ 95 and other canons the lens sticks and wont retract , error 18 its famous, Any how i sent the G 600 back to konica / minolta , Jims advice and they repaired it under warrenty uk, After 6 weeks aprox the lens locked up again, Error 42 again , I had it repaired and sold it fast , i bought its near relative Konica 510, after that , yes i know silly , but i love the form of these models,the problem with that was the sliding lens cover scratched the inside of the camera, i sent that off for repair under warranty and got rid of it as fast as i could, I think the G models are fine but the problem is they are not built as well as they could be , not as well as they look, Low light focus was a problem for me screen too small and the lens error is a known problem , imho i think as nice as they look and feel they can be well left alone, my Casio P 600 doesc everything better focus 100% right in light or dark, auto white balance perfect every time, so nice to find for me the perfect snapper.
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Old Sep 2, 2005, 9:15 AM   #19
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8,365

That's the number of shutter actuations on my Konica KD-510z (I don't take as many photos as some people), and I used it just last night, taking some photos of a band playing at a local restaurant..

This camera has been dropped (several times) kicked across the floor by accident (twice than I can remember), left in the yard for several days after falling out of my pocket when working in the yard (I thought it was lost, but workers erecting a new telephone pole in my backyard found it later), had beer spilled on it, used in the pouring rain without any protection, and generally abused. I bring it with me everywhere in a pants pocket (and have since I got it in mid-July 2003).

It works just fine and it looks just fine (other than some scrapes where it got kicked across concrete once, and a couple of small scratches from car keys in my pocket).

I would not trade this camera for any other subcompact made, even if you were willing to reimburse me for what I paid for it over 2 years ago, which was a lot more than you can buy one for now). IOW, it's not for sale. I like it way too much.

One of the reasons I bought this camera was because I wanted something reliable.

Steve said this about the older KD-500z (and other than some cosmetic differences, the newer KD-510z/G500 uses the same basic body style, and the identical lens).

Quote:

The KD-500Z is physically identical to its 4-megapixel sibling, the KD-400Z except for the darker body color. It employs the same high quality Hexanon 3x optical zoom lens and state of the art image processing hardware in a very durable stainless steel body. This is a camera that can go anywhere and survive the trip no matter how many times you sit on it or bang it around in a suitcase.
http://www.steves-digicams.com/2003_...d500z_pg5.html

Based on my experience with the newer KD-510z, I'd agree.

The newer models have more features (including user adjustable ISO speed, color, contrast, etc.), and they've improved the image processing, but it's the same lens you had problems with.

Look, I've seen reports of the lens mechanism error you got. You see the same kind of reports with other models too (Canon, Casio, etc.). If you do anything to block one of these extending lenses while it's trying to extend, it can damage the mechanism. If you drop a camera (especially if the lens is extended), it can damage the mechanism.

What happened to yours? I don't know. Perhaps it was a manufacturing defect, or perhaps you're using one in a way that isinconsistent with how most users operate one of these cameras.

But, not everyone has these kinds of problems (it's probably a very small percentage, since I onlyremember seeing about 6or 7 users report this problem, and that includesall of the models in this series combined: KD-310z, KD-400z, KD-410z, KD-500z, KD-510z, G500, G600).

I consider these little cameras to be extremely well made.
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Old Sep 11, 2005, 5:01 AM   #20
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Thank you Jim for your opinion but im sure you have ied ALL the competing cameras and yet still you think thiese G 500 ect models the best , well thats good to know , i had problems and the konica/ minolta dealer where i bought my 2 models told me they had so many of these G500 / 600 / and previous Konica 510s with faults that she feared selling them for the returns was higher than average ,even so i do love there form , in view of your continuing loyalty to this range i have AGAIN bought refurbished a KD 500 in black /grey color for £99 uk , thought after your post that i might just have been unlucky before ? its possible and with all the respect you command on this forum me included im having yet anouther go , this one to be my car / days out grab camera , , Seems like its just point and shoot not so many settings , any advice on this one /any thing i should know, also put a screen saver on the inside to see if the scratched inside by the lens where the cover open and closes problem ive had with the 510 , hope this will protect the metel this time, cut it round the lens took hrs ,well thanks , also whats your advice now jim for those who cant find a new G series Fuji F 10 or Panasonic FX 9 they both look to me standoutsmall cameras ?can you advice please im looking to get one for my son rgrds Abnett.WORLDS WORST SPELLER !
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