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Old Jan 24, 2003, 8:08 PM   #1
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Default Who Should I believe?

I wanted to get some opinions about the application of filters for digital cameras and, specifically, for my D7Hi. My camera club instructor tells me that there are a great range of filters (other than the standard circular polarizer/UV type) that can be used with the D7, but the sales rep at my local camera store says "absolutely NO, don't buy any creative filters, that's what photoshop is for".

Can anybody out there please shed some light? I have an assignment utilizing different filters that is due in two weeks and I'm really confused. Thanks!

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Old Jan 24, 2003, 10:28 PM   #2
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Actually both points are valid, and you should not exclude one from another!

A close up (+1, +2, etc) in macro is hard to achieve in Photoshop. A graduated or color filter on the other hand can be achieved with either... Other effects filters like stars, multiple pictures, etc can be done in Photoshop as well, but they vary with your level of expertise, or what plug-ins/actions are already available!

BTW the 7hi/i also come with their own electronic filters (warm to cold) that you can dial in that doesn't belong either to the screw in type or Photoshop! :lol: :lol: :lol: They are just tools for your imagination/creativity.
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Old Jan 24, 2003, 11:24 PM   #3
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NHL, thanks for your reply. I am thinking of purchasing an ND filter for my Hi (I already have a circular polarizer). My understanding is that there are many kinds of ND filters with different strengths including ND Graduated filters. Do they all do the same? Are the end results different with each filter? Have you ever used any with your D7?
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Old Jan 25, 2003, 4:06 AM   #4
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There is another (very good) reason to have real filters on hand. They actually reduce the amount the light, meaning you have to compensate by using different exposure settings. This is critical for certain scenes, like water falls (a filter lets you use longer exposure so you get a flowing water effect). For example, check out this link http://www.cokin.fr/cokin-data/compo...tre-152st.html

A digital filter will not have any effect on the exposure setting.
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Old Jan 25, 2003, 6:55 AM   #5
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A ND will do what Albert described, although one can blur out flowing water in Photoshop as well (J'espere que je ne te contradis pas Albert). A graduated ND will let you darken selective area like bright sky, and keep the bottom part of the picture neutral, but then you can do this with Photoshop as well with the gradient tool (or dodging). A color graduated ND let you change the sky color or background to more dramatic effects.
http://www.cokin.fr/ico8-p20.html

There are color (also graduated or ND) filters that when used with a polarizer can change to different colors depending on how the filter is polarized... Like I said it depends on which tool you are familiar with, an optical filter will help you preserve the quality of the original shot, whereas you can almost do everything in Photoshop (with even more control) albeit sometime at the detriment of the pictures quality, but is that what special effects are all about?

Actually look @ notre ami Albert's link for the various effect examples of what you can do with either tools (Photoshop will off-course take more post-editing time):
http://www.cokin.fr/ico8-galleri.html
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Old Jan 25, 2003, 12:09 PM   #6
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I guess the real question here is: Are ND and ND Graduated filters interchangeable? Can they both achieve the same results or is it advisable to buy one of each?
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Old Jan 25, 2003, 7:33 PM   #7
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Plain ND is uniform across the whole surface, ie the effect applies to the whole picture (for example darken the whole scene) whereas the density on the graduated varies from light to dark, ie 1/2 of the picture is dark and the other 1/2 is light with a gradual change over in between. They are two different filters with two different effects.
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