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Old Nov 6, 2005, 4:24 PM   #1
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I am used to the old fashion cameras but new to the field of digital photography. I have a very simple question:

I got a Konica Minolta A200. When setting my zoom at 28mm with f/5.6 in manual focusing mode, I can control my focusing distance up to 2m and then I get infinity indication.
So the question is this: how do I control depth of field when my object is say 5 meters away?

Thanks!
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Old Nov 6, 2005, 11:30 PM   #2
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You control depth of field in the same manner; with aperture and focal length adjustments. The difference is that, due to the smaller size of the sensor, compared to 35mm film, you get about 4 times more DOF for any given settings. When trying to isolate a subject, such as for portraits, use the longest focal length and widest aperture consistent with your goals for the picture.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"I used a 35mm manual camera for quite a long time and had some difficulties in the transition to digital, but managed to adjust. Some things are a little different, but photography is still photography.

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Old Nov 7, 2005, 3:48 PM   #3
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Yes, this is nice advice, but does not actually answers the question. For example, if I have a group of objects which span a few meters along the line of shooting, I want all of them to be clear and the background before them and after them to be blurred.
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Old Nov 7, 2005, 4:43 PM   #4
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Focus on the middle obejct and then bracket with different apertures.
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Old Nov 7, 2005, 4:54 PM   #5
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You just need to take some time and experiment to discover the differences in your new camera. Try several variations on the same shot to discover how it works. If you expect the same results as with a 35mm film camera, you will be disappointed. If you take the time to learn the capabiltiies of digital, and work within these capabilities, you will be able to take pictures quite as good as before. I did not immediately get good results with 35mm when I started, but learned over time.

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