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Old Feb 12, 2006, 9:44 AM   #1
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Hi, I only got my KM A200 for a couple of weeks now and I was wondering how I could blur the water and create that creamy effect on it. I have tried to set the shutter speed to say something like 1/4 of a sec in manual mode and the apperture gets a value of f9 which is not sufficient enough at daylight. My images become extremely overexposed and all I see is a dull white image. Any ideas to get blurring effect of water at daylight.

Your help would be much appreciated.

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Old Feb 12, 2006, 11:40 AM   #2
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Try looking at this thread:
http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...321418#p321418
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Old Feb 12, 2006, 12:15 PM   #3
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Thanks. That helps a lot but what about longer exposures at daylight is that possible when you are limited to a max aperture value of f11 ?
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Old Feb 12, 2006, 5:09 PM   #4
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Due to the natural limitations of using longer exposures in very bright light, I normally don't even attempt them unless it is a very cloudy day (my favorite) or very late in the afternoon. In the image I posted in the other thread & this one, it was very late afternoon & the model was mostly in shade, so a gold, 42" reflector was aimed at her (off camera) to insure she was lit well enough. Even though it was fairly dimly lit, I still had to shoot at f10 to make them work.
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Old Feb 12, 2006, 6:04 PM   #5
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One way for allowing longer exposures in daylight is ND (neutral density) filter which simply filters certain amount of light away

Here's quite good guide to different filter types.
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/FrameWor...oyaFilters.pdf
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Old Feb 13, 2006, 3:55 AM   #6
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Thanks E.T. I have looked through ebay about Hoya ND filters and there are like three types of them x2 x4 x8. As I understand this has to do with how many stops you want to go for x2 for 1 x4 for 2 stops and x8 for 3 stops.

Question raised now. Do I need a filter adapter ring for this filters or they can be mounted on camera with nothing additional ?



Thanks again for your response.



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Old Feb 13, 2006, 10:50 AM   #7
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With the A series cameras, you can run into a problem with vignetting using some filters if you stick to 49mm filters. So, you may want to go with a step-up ring using larger diameter filters to help avoid it (especially if you want to stack filters).

You can find some discussion about vignetting and filters with the A Series models in this FAQ. Using a 49-62mm step up ring with 62mm filters seems to be a popular choice.

http://www.pbase.com/mtf_foto_studies/mtf_faq#VI

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Old Feb 13, 2006, 3:13 PM   #8
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Some Hoya's filters like Pro 1 UV is 3mm thick so those won't cause any noticeable vignetting, also same series Polatizer (4mm) is really good. (+Pro 1 serie filters have front threads so normal lens cap works)
In certain circumstances, like when using full aperture there can be slight signs of vignetting but that's visible only with really even background color.

Unfortunately it just looks like Hoya doesn't have Pro 1 serie ND filters in 49mm size.
http://www.2filter.com/hoya/hoyasolidND06.html

Step up to 62mm is surest bet for "unknown" filter, some filters are quite much thicker.
Neither small step up help really because it moves filter farther, also step up itself should be such that it expands immediately after male thread. (plus preferably thin step up)
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Old Feb 13, 2006, 4:36 PM   #9
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I had on a 49mm polarising filter on for the shots I posted. As a matter of fact, I've only used 49mm Tiffen filters since I had my D7i & have never had a problem.
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Old Mar 10, 2007, 3:58 PM   #10
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Kalypso wrote:
Quote:
Due to the natural limitations of using longer exposures in very bright light, I normally don't even attempt them unless it is a very cloudy day (my favorite) or very late in the afternoon. In the image I posted in the other thread & this one, it was very late afternoon & the model was mostly in shade, so a gold, 42" reflector was aimed at her (off camera) to insure she was lit well enough. Even though it was fairly dimly lit, I still had to shoot at f10 to make them work.
Very useful advice on setting up a scene, and really super capture

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