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Old Jul 2, 2007, 6:22 AM   #1
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The Divine Comedy (Italian: Commedia, later christened "Divina" by Giovanni Boccaccio), written by Dante Alighieri between 1308 and his death in 1321, is widely considered the central epic poem of Italian literature, and is seen as one of the greatest works of world literature ever. A culmination of the medieval world-view of the afterlife, it established the Tuscan dialect in which it is written as the Italian standard.
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Old Jul 2, 2007, 6:26 AM   #2
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through the various regions of hell described in Dante's Inferno
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Old Jul 2, 2007, 6:36 AM   #3
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the sun was to low for a walk in the woods, so i went to 'winters hill' and got out my filterto get some sunsets
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Old Jul 2, 2007, 6:46 AM   #4
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Those are just beautiful pictures especially the 1st for me, very nice
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Old Jul 2, 2007, 5:52 PM   #5
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bill43210 wrote:
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The Divine Comedy (Italian: Commedia, later christened "Divina" by Giovanni Boccaccio), written by Dante Alighieri between 1308 and his death in 1321, is widely considered the central epic poem of Italian literature, and is seen as one of the greatest works of world literature ever. A culmination of the medieval world-view of the afterlife, it established the Tuscan dialect in which it is written as the Italian standard.
Ah, Dante Allighieri from Florance, the heart of Tuscany, where the Renaissance flourished! Soexciting to follow the historical perspective...Much earlier than the Romans occupied Italy, Italian peninsula had been dominated by a mysterious people whose language resembled none of their neighbouring societies. These unusual people whom the Romans called Etrusci or Tuscii, suggesting the Tuscany valley, spoke a non-Indo European, agglutinative language.According to Herodotus, the father of history, before the Trojan War, Etruscans had emigrated into the Italian Peninsula from the inner western part of Anatolia which is known as Lydia, because of a terrible famine which lasted foryears... As they say nothing by chance :!:

That'sa great series you provided,stronglyevolking thetheme: Dante's Inferno

As with Hercules, I'd also favour #1. which alsomakes a good comparisonbetween virtues of thecentral weighted average meteringand theevaluative metering of #2


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Old Jul 2, 2007, 11:04 PM   #6
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#1 certainly has a spectacularly Armageddon-esque look to it, a flammable palette.
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Old Jul 3, 2007, 4:48 AM   #7
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Great pictures. A friend of mine wrote a short story, Dante in Haga, an area with old houses in our home town.

He claimed that Dante is moving backwards (literally) with his face to the past. Hell should then be the impossibility to move forwards, having to face the less than good things we all do at times, without the possibility to change anything.

Dunno

An analogy. We "modern" people perhaps tend to looking mostly to the future, whereas the Old Greecs looked backwords into the golden age that had passed

/T


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Old Jul 3, 2007, 6:41 AM   #8
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Torgny wrote:
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Great pictures. A friend of mine wrote a short story, Dante in Haga, an area with old houses in our home town.

He claimed that Dante is moving backwards (literally) with his face to the past. Hell should then be the impossibility to move forwards, having to face the less than good things we all do at times, without the possibility to change anything.

Dunno

An analogy. We "modern" people perhaps tend to looking mostly to the future, whereas the Old Greecs looked backwords into the golden age that had passed

/T

I think that friends of yoursis an admirer ofBertolt Brecht and his idea of Epic theater vs. classical drama ; )

Please do not get me wrong, there are many aspects Iadmire inBrecht's ideas in terms of freeing humans from their accepted boundaries and the fates...

Ah,my only sorrow isaboutsomeso-called 'modern people'ina state of'emotional'reactivenessandover simplification, appear to be against everthing whichwill takethem for ages tocomprehend

Here'sa rule of archeology, I'd like to remind : The future may be fixed, but it is the past which is often changing




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Old Jul 3, 2007, 8:28 AM   #9
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bahadir wrote


"I think that friends of yoursis an admirer ofBertolt Brecht and his idea of Epic theater vs. classical drama ; )

Please do not get me wrong, there are many aspects Iadmire inBrecht's ideas in terms of freeing humans from their accepted boundaries and the fates..."


Yes, there is no need to re-invent the wheel. The classical drama has got it all. As you know Brecht spoke about Verfremdungseffekt

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alienation_effect (we´re in this together)

as a way to distance the audience from the play (the subjective from the objective).

There might be some benefits to that approach when we daily see and hear examples of the most horrendous actions around the world.

Perhaps we need to distance ourselves from the "world" to be able to see clearly what happens. Perhaps it´s time for a renaissance of the enlightenment. Sadly the cortex seems to have limited ability to control the mammal- and reptile parts of the brain

And we don´t seem to learn from history.

Fun exchanging ideas. Oh, one more thing.

bahadir, you wrote the other day about the artist as the one who sees patterns in the chaos.

Perhaps it´s meaningful to add that the artist probably is benefited (?) by having distance to his work. It´s easy to get lost when you don´t have a map. Thanks for the exchange

Torgny




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Old Jul 3, 2007, 11:02 AM   #10
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bill43210

Besides the beauty of this picture - is it a S5 Pro you are using or some heavy filter, or...?

/T
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