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Old Nov 20, 2007, 3:11 AM   #11
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You'd have to go about 130 miles to find a decent hill, much less "rugged terrain." But thanks much for the information; you just explained why I'd never seen them before.

Living in North Texas, where it's rather flat, no surprise that they don't show upmuch.


Not muchrugged terrain around Davenport,either, um? I grew up in Sabula, about50 milesnorth of there.




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Old Nov 20, 2007, 3:46 AM   #12
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ac.smith wrote:
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....Often formed by air currents over rugged terrain. ...
My best example of interesting clouds formed in that way is at....

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...790295#p790295

...where they imitate the landscape quite remarkably. Perhaps the hills and the clouds were formed by analogous weather patterns,on two vastly different timescales.

I am frequently struck by the merciless way in which Nature cheats when displaying its cloudscapes, using blatant cloning which would be banned by the moderators in any photographic forum.

When stitching panoramas I often finish up with something needing cropping to remove thecurved edges. Sometimes I can't bear to crop it, so I paint in some extra sky and/or heather & bracken with the clone tool. I went to extreme lengths to avoid obvious cloning, until suddenly I realised that blatant cloningwas frequently plain to see all over a cloudy blue sky.

I frequently squeal to a halt when I spot a fine example, but usually it's blown away by the time I park & get the camera out. So congratulations, 'The Barbarian', for catching this fine specimen.

We can observe similar patterns (in water) in profusion at the seaside, of course, but they're even harder to catch.
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Old Nov 20, 2007, 9:35 AM   #13
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The Barbarian wrote:
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You'd have to go about 130 miles to find a decent hill, much less "rugged terrain." But thanks much for the information; you just explained why I'd never seen them before.

Living in North Texas, where it's rather flat, no surprise that they don't show upmuch.


Not muchrugged terrain around Davenport,either, um? I grew up in Sabula, about50 milesnorth of there.



I was raised in Dallas and went to college in Denton so I'm somewhat familar with the terrain. Seems like we've switched.

According to the quick research I did last night elevation differences as little as a few hundred feet can trigger lenticular clouds. The terrain has to create enough upward movement of the wind to form a standing wave and the peak of the wave be in cooler air to cause condensation.

Power plane pilot avoid areas of lenticular clouds if possible because of turbulence.
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