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Old Jan 20, 2008, 6:15 AM   #1
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Hello All,

Here are 3 photos I took 2 nights ago - Friday evening 18/1/2008. Photos are from the last evening of my parents' visit to us (my wife Tundi and myself). My parenst are now back in Tasmania, almost 2000km away.

It was a spectacular sunset, and thankfully I had my DSLR camera and 2 lenses with me while we were all walking along Glenelg beach. This beach is only about 10 to 15 minutes drive from central Adelaide, and less than 10 minutes from where we live.

These 3 photos were taken at 8 minute intervals (I didn't do that on purpose, in fact I had taken several photos between these!) But these 3 landscape shots I chose as some of my favourite of the sinking, and only when checking the EXIF info later, noticed that interesting fact.

So photo 1 was taken at 20:22, photo 2 at 20:30 and photo 3 at 20:38!

I'd love your comments / feedback (as always!) Here is photo 1.... view from near the shore towards the jetty.... using my Canon 28-135mm lens.
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Old Jan 20, 2008, 6:16 AM   #2
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Photo 2....

This photo I took with my 100-300mm lens at 300mm.... (don't worry I didn't stare at the sun through my camera, just quickly glanced and captured this shot!)

This photo is pretty much dead "centre" when half the sun had already slipped below the horizon. I find it interesting that the sun does not appear perfectly "round" when near the horizon.... due to atmospheric distortions.
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Old Jan 20, 2008, 6:22 AM   #3
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Photo 3...

finally, just 8 minutes after the sun had set (i.e. 8 minutes later than photo 2) - I took this photo - again with my 28-135mm lens, this time wide at 28mm.

Thankfully there were such lovely colours in the sky.... it made a great final evening for my parents 8 day stay here.

I look forward to your feedback about these photos.

Best wishes and kind regards,

Paul Jansen

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Old Jan 20, 2008, 1:32 PM   #4
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Great shots........nice to look at but hard on the camera.............musket.
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Old Jan 20, 2008, 1:57 PM   #5
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Paul,

These are great photographies, a triptych, three variations on a theme.

A hundred years ago there was a "fight" in swedish litterature history when the poet Erik Axel Karfeldt compared the night moon with a casserole lid. Came to my mind when I saw picture number two.

Hope it´s ok to call it gorgeous like a piece of heavenly bakery

Torgny


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Old Jan 21, 2008, 1:33 AM   #6
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Hello Musket,

Thanks for looking and commenting!

Yes, the sun is strong and I wouldn't want either to be looking at it directly for more than a fleeting glance, NOR would I set my camera to expose directly at the sun for longer than a very short exposure.

I read somewhere that the sensors of DSLR (and P&S) cameras will survive the UV / sun's power from plenty of normally exposed "sun photos". But by exposing the sensor for a long exposure directly at the sun (e.g. some seconds or more) - that is risky and one might damage the sensor that way.

Your thoughts?

Paul
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Old Jan 21, 2008, 2:51 AM   #7
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Oh, I really missed those long days lasting until after 8:30 : )

All very lovely images imbued with suchlovely warmcolours...Liked the busy silhouettes of people andthe dock with lightposts between which the sun is descending in #1 . The couple and the sailboat contributes with a pleasing theme as well as the rule of the thirds to pic. #3 (my fave!) in which the clouds of copper responds to the reddish trace of the vanished sun beyond the ocean...

Thanks for theinspiration, my friend
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Old Jan 21, 2008, 4:06 AM   #8
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pj1974 wrote:
Quote:
Hello Musket,

Thanks for looking and commenting!

Yes, the sun is strong and I wouldn't want either to be looking at it directly for more than a fleeting glance, NOR would I set my camera to expose directly at the sun for longer than a very short exposure.

I read somewhere that the sensors of DSLR (and P&S) cameras will survive the UV / sun's power from plenty of normally exposed "sun photos". But by exposing the sensor for a long exposure directly at the sun (e.g. some seconds or more) - that is risky and one might damage the sensor that way.

Your thoughts?

Paul
I don't know what the safe limits are for exposure of direct sunlight

the camera manufacturers should give some guidelines to prevent

sensor damage. I think Nikon included protection in their latest firmware

releases so that if the camera thinks the scene and settings might

damage the camera, the camera will refuse to shot the scene..........musket.
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Old Jan 21, 2008, 5:50 AM   #9
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Torgny,

Thanks for your valued comments. I appreciate you taking the time to look.

And I also am glad to hear about your Swedish literature "fight" that my second photo helped you to share about Erik Axel Karfeldt's likening of the moon to a casserole lid! I can see what he means, and how it came to your mind!

I say that there is certainly often amazing "kitchen comparisons" around nature if we take or make the time to look!

Regards,

Paul
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Old Jan 21, 2008, 5:59 AM   #10
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Bahadir,

Hello there... I'm glad that I could share a bit of summer joy with you. I also enjoy very much the long evenings... I think that is my favourite part of the year, the ground still radiating warmth as the sun disappears or has disappeared below the horizon! Your summer and winter temperatures there in Izmir are very similar to ours here in Adelaide, just our seasons are half a year apart from each other!

It is so interesting what you wrote about photo 3, that the couple and the sailboat contribute to the composition of that shot. Both my parents (who are not "photo experts" but who DO enjoy looking at photos) as well as my wife all commented that they think the couple and the boat are "well positioned" or "add lots of interest" to the photo.

Of course I value your opinion a lot, and I appreciate your comments genuinely.

Regards,

Paul
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