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Old Oct 13, 2008, 6:30 PM   #11
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squirl033 wrote:
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Generally speaking, I prefer the slower shutterapproach… it gives the image a sort of silky feel, and seems to impart the sense of moving water better. There are times when freezing the motion can be effective, especially when you want to show droplets or splashes of water in mid-air, or to capture the spray of a breaking wave or a turbulent waterfall, but for most river and waterfall scenes, I like the smooth, flowing feel a slower shutter gives.
Thank you, squirl033, for your reply and your views. I found a place to study rushing/running/flowing water. Very fascinating and never ending variations

I have some more I'd like to show. Hope you'll join me

Torgny


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Old Oct 13, 2008, 7:22 PM   #12
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Love how you captured the moving water!
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Old Oct 13, 2008, 7:53 PM   #13
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cmoy wrote:
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Love how you captured the moving water!
Thank you, cmoy. Have too many pictures to share. Hope you follow up the river Säve

Torgny


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Old Oct 13, 2008, 8:14 PM   #14
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Wonder how the painters of old used their eyes, before the photo age. This scenery is "seen" by a Canon Digic ll image processor with algorithms based upon millions of photos. A photographic tool by the photographers themselves

Strong sun. Sharpening





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Old Oct 13, 2008, 8:24 PM   #15
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/T


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Old Oct 13, 2008, 8:36 PM   #16
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Torgny wrote:
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/T

Very NICE!
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Old Oct 13, 2008, 9:08 PM   #17
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"Wonder how the painters of old used their eyes before the photo age."

i expect the painters of old did with their mind's eye - and their brush - what we do today with a long exposure... to achieve the feeling of movement in flowing water, they produced with brush strokes the same kind of effect we get by slowing the shutter. probably lent itself quite well to the subject, too!

your shot of the kayakers is a good example of a situation where you want to freeze the water with a faster shutter. of course, to keep the kayakers in focus, you need the fast shutter anyway, but the shorter exposure will also capture the turbulent - in some cases even violent - action of rapids, and the power of the water, which convey the action of the sport.
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Old Oct 14, 2008, 6:26 AM   #18
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Hi Torgny

Wow, quite a journey along the river Save you've taken us! Thanks for sharing.

I think you have shown how dramatically the simple "change in shutter speed" can convey a mood and different dynamics of water. Thanks for the variety!

I particularly enjoy the slower shutter speed options you've presented here, as squirl also wrote. However the "mid speed" shutter speed with "choppy, just moving water" are also great.

Thanks for the autumn colours. Enjoyable from half a world away. We're already here in the middle of a dry and hot spring here in South Australia!!

Paul
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Old Oct 15, 2008, 8:57 AM   #19
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Hej,

Thank you all for following this perhaps a bit lengthy thread, but you know how it is.

The Säve River, like any river, distributes water from different altitudes. It's a river like most rivers on the planet. It's got many faces and it can be beautiful and at times dangerous

Paul, hope you enjoy your season. It's a planet full of wonders

Last picture from where we started. This time you have some ground to dry your feet

Torgny





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Old Oct 16, 2008, 7:36 AM   #20
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Torgny wrote:
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Wonder how the painters of old used their eyes, before the photo age. This scenery is "seen" by a Canon Digic ll image processor with algorithms based upon millions of photos. A photographic tool by the photographers themselves

Good point to consider...Watching a skilled painter has always fascinated me!

As you know, training was often set on apprenticeship through which the young would use his eyes and mind best to learn how to make the required 'patterns'convincingly observinghis master, and then occasionally finishing the relatively unimportant parts on behalf ofhim. Difficult though!One cannot take the brush, dip it into the paint and startto paint a body of water, etc. It requires painting a coloured background layer first!Ah, I remembermy childhoodwhen I helpedmy uncle make hisoilpaints from ground pigment and linseed or poppy seed oil for a start!(Of course thesepatterns could change from time to time when some paintersthought it necessary to apply anew understandingof natural laws to their art in the light of their keen observations)

I'd too prefer relatively slower shutter speeds with'how slow'changing according to the intended impact in the composition...I liked watching the 'flowing water' variationsabove and triedappling themto your composion #4 in my mind!
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