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Old Dec 15, 2009, 8:55 AM   #11
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Holy **** - that's what I've always been dreaming about - the great Bynx in his birthday suit right in my livingroom *lol*

Would be something different of course
For a slight fee I make personal appearances. Im also a great gift for Christmas. Very inexpensive.
Here is an early example of a Reclining Nude of Bynx.
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Old Dec 15, 2009, 9:42 AM   #12
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Absolutely gorgeous work Walter.
Thanks. Bynx - Much obliged!



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It's like a logical and perfect evolution: HDR + Panorama + Walter = winners. The level of micro details in the houses, the lights and the smoke is impressive.
Your words, not mine, but sounds good in my ears......Thank you, Ordo!



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It sure is nice working with top notch equipment. Beautiful photo.
I'm not so sure about top-notch equipment. The G1 is a rather plain, entry-level camera with a mediocre-to-good kit-lens. It doesn't even say Leica Vario Elmarit on the zoom-lens any more (on the FZ-28 it does), but this one is Panasonic-glass and its not exactly a test-winner. Mind you, its good enough for me - I praise it every day - and its a great step upwards in IQ from the FZ-28 - but thats probably more due to the larger MOS Sensor than the glass in front of it.

But, thank you for your kind words, spy!




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really nice panorama. some of the individual shots (#3) are great in there own right, putting together in the pano is even better. lovely
Thank you Hards80 - I'm actually pleased with the result myself.



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ok, that's it, Im so close to moving up there, man... You really do know how to make your town gorgeous !
Ahh, c'mon! - Your own village-church looks good enough for me. And before you buy a ticket north, you haven't seen Fredrikstad in daylight yet...

;o)
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Old Dec 15, 2009, 9:55 AM   #13
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Absolutely stunning, Walter! Sensational colours and amazing details - I want to get such great night shots too

What stands out at the pano are the fantastic layers - foregrund, water, beautiful town lights, sunlight and then the terrific sky!

Is it possible to buy that pano as a poster? Would need something to put above my couch

He-he! Tell me when you are getting married and I send you one as a marriage-gift! The digital picture that is - you can make a print of it yourself - my printer is on the blink again!

This is a better offer than Bynx'es proposal anyway....



Thank you for your kind and encouraging words, maggo85 - You will be there in a few months. Wintertime is a great time for exercising night-shots as the air is usually quite clear and the nights are long.

There is a special athmosphere doing night-shots as well, and it can be quite amusing. People passing by your tripod are convinced that you are a nutcase , because all sane people take pictures in the sunlight......!

Cheers!
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Old Jan 18, 2010, 6:34 AM   #14
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Walter, I'm sorry to put that old thread up again, but I'm really interested in your middle-exposures and the way you did that panorama.

I tried to do a view blue-hour-shots on Saturday, but I think I choosed wrong settings and did wrong focussing.. I'm not really satisfied with the results.

Maybe you can give me some general tips/help for shooting at night/the blue hour - that would be very helpful for me!!

Thank you in advance & best regards,

Markus
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Old Jan 18, 2010, 3:24 PM   #15
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Don't be sorry - It's a delight to see this thread again.

But I'm not sure how I can help you. I was pretty 'green' myself with my new camera then. I have had this camera for 7 days, when I went for this night-shooting exercise: http://forums.steves-digicams.com/la...ew-camera.html and this is where I took the panoramic-shots as well.

To do a panorama, you need a Panorama-software that stitches the single exposures together to a panorama-stitch. Myself, I use panoramaMaker 4 by ArcSoft: http://download.cnet.com/ArcSoft-Pan...html?tag=mncol that software came with my camera. Its easy to use and fairly simple to operate. No sweat! In the case of HDR-Panorama, you map the HDR's first and then you stitch them together. Not the other way round!!

I have not so much experience with night-shots and have no special tricks up my sleeve. I just set up my tripod and frame, focus and shoot. If there is little or no contrast to shoot, I set the camera to manual focus, which is quite easy to do on my G1. I always use Aperture-function and set my ISO to 100 (because of the extra noise-level you get with long exposures), and let the camera decide on the shutter-speed (only on tripod, of course). You have to be sure to leave enough overlap on all exposures, so PanoramaMaker can find its way around your pictures and find enough equal points to make a seam. (I don't know the right expressions in English for this function!)

You have to be careful when setting up and level your tripod to get an even horizon, otherwise your panorama gets 'bulky'!

I am not sure that the middle-exposures (which are pretty dark) will help you much, but I'll post them anyway.

Here are the middle-exposures of the Left, Middle and Right picture, making this panorama. (let me know if there is anything else you want to know...)
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Old Jan 19, 2010, 12:59 AM   #16
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But I'm not sure how I can help you. I was pretty 'green' myself with my new camera then. I have had this camera for 7 days, when I went for this night-shooting exercise: http://forums.steves-digicams.com/la...ew-camera.html and this is where I took the panoramic-shots as well.
First of all I would like to thank you for taking the time and explain some things to me - that's why I'm here for, to learn something

Are the shots in the thread you mentioned above all HDR's - they're all great BTW, but I'm not sure about HDR or not

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To do a panorama, you need a Panorama-software that stitches the single exposures together to a panorama-stitch. Myself, I use panoramaMaker 4 by ArcSoft: http://download.cnet.com/ArcSoft-Pan...html?tag=mncol that software came with my camera. Its easy to use and fairly simple to operate. No sweat! In the case of HDR-Panorama, you map the HDR's first and then you stitch them together. Not the other way round!!
I've used PhotoStitch, that came with my camera, to do my first panoramas - and the daylight panos I tried came out very well, you couldn't see the stitching at all! But when it comes to night-shots, I had problems with the exposure of the different shots I think - I had a three-stitch-pano and there where three different blues of the sky at the stitches...

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I have not so much experience with night-shots and have no special tricks up my sleeve. I just set up my tripod and frame, focus and shoot. If there is little or no contrast to shoot, I set the camera to manual focus, which is quite easy to do on my G1. I always use Aperture-function and set my ISO to 100 (because of the extra noise-level you get with long exposures), and let the camera decide on the shutter-speed (only on tripod, of course). You have to be sure to leave enough overlap on all exposures, so PanoramaMaker can find its way around your pictures and find enough equal points to make a seam. (I don't know the right expressions in English for this function!)
I think my problem with the night-shots was that I didn't left enough overlap between the single shots - how much to you recommend? About 1/3?

Next time I'll have to try manual focus - haven't thought about that during my shooting... maybe my brain was frozen because of the "nice" temperature
Do I have to set manual focus to endless/infinite (unendlich)?

ISO was set to 100, but I was setting the exposure time, not the f-stop - what do you use usually for night scenes like these? F11/F16 or something?

Finally, I'm looking forward to my next try - Walter, you really inspired me to do such kind of shots and get up early in the morning to capture this blue-hour-look I love

EDIT: I'm sorry for not seeing it, but in your single-shots you use a overlap of about half of the picture... this would have worked much better with my shots I guess
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Last edited by maggo85; Jan 19, 2010 at 1:27 AM.
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Old Jan 19, 2010, 1:06 PM   #17
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...Are the shots in the thread you mentioned above all HDR's - they're all great BTW, but I'm not sure about HDR or not.
The shots in # 1 are HDR's while the shots I posted for you, in # 15 are single-shots, the middle-exposure of the ones in #1.



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...But when it comes to night-shots, I had problems with the exposure of the different shots I think - I had a three-stitch-pano and there where three different blues of the sky at the stitches...

Were they HDR's when you stitched them or single-shots put together?

If they were HDR's and showed different colors, then you may have a problem with giving the 3 individual HDR's the same treatment with settings in Photomatic. For panoramas, I always save the settings (Preset-mode) of the first HDR and use (load it) it for all of the HDR's of one panorama, that way, they have all been treated the same amount of settings.

If they were single shots, showing differen colors, then you may have different exposures for each of the 3. In this case you must go all manual in your settings of your camera. First, try to find an exposure that will fit each of the 3 sections, and shoot them manual with the same f-stop and shutter-speed. That way you will get the same colors.


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Old Jan 19, 2010, 1:16 PM   #18
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Do I have to set manual focus to endless/infinite (unendlich)?

ISO was set to 100, but I was setting the exposure time, not the f-stop - what do you use usually for night scenes like these? F11/F16 or something?

You must have something to focus on. If you have a small f-stop it does not matter that much. If you shoot wide open, you must focus on something. I don't know the Canon 450D, so I cannot tell you. Has the lens some sort of dial where you can see how far your focus is reaching?

I use my EVF or my LCD to focus manually. The camera enlarges the pocus-point either 5x or 10x so it is easy to see.

I ususally use 5.6 or 6.3 f-stops - but this is individual, depending on how much light and what kind of light there is.

Good luck, maggo85 / Markus!!
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Old Jan 20, 2010, 2:39 AM   #19
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Were they HDR's when you stitched them or single-shots put together?

If they were HDR's and showed different colors, then you may have a problem with giving the 3 individual HDR's the same treatment with settings in Photomatic. For panoramas, I always save the settings (Preset-mode) of the first HDR and use (load it) it for all of the HDR's of one panorama, that way, they have all been treated the same amount of settings.

If they were single shots, showing differen colors, then you may have different exposures for each of the 3. In this case you must go all manual in your settings of your camera. First, try to find an exposure that will fit each of the 3 sections, and shoot them manual with the same f-stop and shutter-speed. That way you will get the same colors.


Yes, they were HDR's - it could be possible that I used dfferent settings for the single HDR's - I'll try it tonight the way you described. But I had this problem with single shot's to (just a little bit, but it was there) - maybe because I focussed on the sky in the first and on the mountain in the second shot...

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You must have something to focus on. If you have a small f-stop it does not matter that much. If you shoot wide open, you must focus on something. I don't know the Canon 450D, so I cannot tell you. Has the lens some sort of dial where you can see how far your focus is reaching?

I use my EVF or my LCD to focus manually. The camera enlarges the pocus-point either 5x or 10x so it is easy to see.

I ususally use 5.6 or 6.3 f-stops - but this is individual, depending on how much light and what kind of light there is.
Thank you for the information - I'm gonna try it again with your recommendations another time when the weather is good

BTW, I've created the thread Shooting tips for the "blue-hour" in the "Newbie help" forum - maybe your can post these helpful information there too so that others can learn something too
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Old Jan 20, 2010, 4:14 AM   #20
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...But I had this problem with single shot's to (just a little bit, but it was there)...
Well, if there is a slight difference in the singles, then that difference would be exaggerated tree times in a HDR. Makes sense. Thats probably your light-meter, metering from a differen subject on each panel and setting different exposures...?

Next time, try to make one trial-shot of each of the 'panels' that you plan to shoot - check the exposure on your LCD, and find one exposure-value that would satify all of them, use this value as your zero-EV for all of the bracketings and go manually from there to make your -EV's and your +EV's. This sounds rather complicated and takes a lot of planning. Not easy to follow there in the dark and possible cold as well. To make it easy on myself I do several series.

Use of Exposure Compensation + Bracketing:

All my HDR's are with minimum 5 exposures (sometimes 7) with 2/3rd EV apart - and I start with let's say the left panel (L) of the planned panorama, set my Exposure Compensation to +1 and shoot 5 exposures (Bracketing) according to the cameras in-body calculation of shutter-speed to the preset f-stop, which is set by me. In other words, I set the f-stop (Aperture-Priority) and leave the metering to the camera to decide on the different shutter-speeds neccesary to get the bracketing-shots right.

This gives me 5 exposures of which at leat one is perfect.

Then I go with the Exposure Compensation set to zero, and do the same thing. Next Bracket-series will be with Exposure Compensation set to -1 and so on. If the sun is out and there are deep shadows I make another Bracket-series also with Exposure Compensation set to -2.

Ususally I end up with 4 series of 5 exposures each, giving me 20 exposures for the left panel. (!!) A lot of exposures to keep track of, but I do have most combinations covered.

Very important: If you do such a long series of each panel, you must have a 100% stable tripod and lock your vertical and horisontal svivels accordingly, because you will be 'fiddeling' with your camera-settings in between brackets - thats usually where camera-shake occures!


Now comes the crunch. When coming home with up to 60 exposures for one 3-panel panorama, I pick out the series (5 exposures) for the individual HDR'-panels, that fit together by looking at he shutter-speed of the middle-exposure of each panel. If you choose the right one across all series, you should be ok with all your panels, fitting together in exposures and subsequently colors of the sky.

If I am in doubt, I make a panaorama with the different singles to check the seam and density of sky first, to see where there is a difference and I compensate accordingly (choose maybe a series which has one shutter-speed less or more for the middle-exposure) if needed.

There, now I have disclosed my 'secret' to you (do not let anybody else see this....!) and I hope this last bit was more of help to you than it was to confuse you even more...


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- maybe because I focussed on the sky in the first and on the mountain in the second shot...
BTW, focusing on the sky is seldom a good idea as there is usually not enough contrast there. Your magnificent Austrian mountains on the other hand would be the perfect focussing-spot! Try to find one center-pice as single manual focussing-spot and keep that same focus for all 'panels'.

Last edited by Walter_S; Jan 20, 2010 at 7:44 AM.
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