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Old May 26, 2011, 9:16 AM   #21
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Great picks to see, as always. You're so luck that your wife loves photography also.
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Old May 27, 2011, 12:01 PM   #22
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Thank you, Ordo.

#33) McGraw Rotunda, out-of-camera.


#34) McGraw Rotunda, processed with Topaz Adjust and DeNoise.
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Old May 27, 2011, 1:03 PM   #23
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vvcarpio!

I didn't think this was possible, what you (supposedly) did with this very, very underexposed copy of the McGraw Rotunda i # 22 - so I thought - What the hell, lets try it.

So I did, copied your first, underexposed shot, transferred it to Ps Elements, from where I activated my TA-PlugIn and went to work.
This Exposure Correction-facility is just great. I wouldn't have thought this was possible.

This goes to show: Never, never overexpose, but keep it on the left (instead of 'go west'...! ), because even if you seriously underexpose - there is always some information that can be used.

Thanks for the eye-opener, vvcarpio!





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Old May 30, 2011, 5:56 PM   #24
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Are these post-processed in any way? These colors and contrasts are amazing!
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Old May 31, 2011, 7:55 PM   #25
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Awesome series. It's been a while since I've seen indoor photographs, and its refreshing to see some of them here. It's hard to choose which one is my favorite as all of them are well captured. Keep on posting!
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Old Jun 1, 2011, 8:27 AM   #26
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You're welcome, Walter. I worked with the original image at 4000+ x 3000+ resolution before shrinking so you might not get as good results with the resized ooc version I posted.

Thanks, Saltine713. Yes they are post-processed. I used Topaz Adjust mainly then adjusted some more using Photoshop CS3.

Thanks, John. I was actually encouraged (forced) to shoot handheld in low light when the family went to Ripley's Believe It or Not Odditorium inTimes Square. After that I tried shooting pictures inside the Library which you see in this series.

#35) Bill Blass Public Catalog Room. I know, I should have moved a little left or right so I would've shown the Empire State Building's antenna...


#36) The periodicals section. This one is taken late in the afternoon. The other one I posted was at noon.


#37) Map Division. Also taken late in the afternoon.


#38) Stairs at the 42nd Street entrance.
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Old Jun 1, 2011, 9:44 AM   #27
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love these posts...want to add a wide angle lens to my arsenal as well.
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Old Jun 1, 2011, 3:00 PM   #28
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Thank you, Donna. I learned of the ultrawide lens from a friend's pictures and asked him the lens he used. Then when I got one, I found out others have been using it here, too. It is exclusively what I use now. I still bring a telephoto lens with me, though, in case I spot celebrities in NYC.

The New York Public Library on Fifth Avenue has so many elegant and dramatically-lit rooms with high Victorian windows. It is just such a great place to practice indoor shooting. And the patrons don't even look up when you start shooting.

#39) Dorot Jewish Division, adjacent to the Periodicals Room.


#40) Edna Barnes Salomon room is where you can borrow a laptop if you're a NY resident.
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Old Jun 2, 2011, 12:36 PM   #29
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Are you using flash? (I would think not)

One time my friend was taking some photographs in Grand Central in NY. He brought me and a friend along to hold remote flashes from across the lobby. It was really funny to see the expressions on the people that walked by.

Anyway, once again, great work! I love the dark, warm colors of the library.
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Old Jun 3, 2011, 7:38 AM   #30
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No, I don't use flash. It's not allowed anyway at the Library. (I sometimes use flash when in gatherings with acquaintances.)

I think I know what you mean about seeing expressions of people we take pictures of especially in the city.

At night, Iíve seen homeless men -- maybe a dozen -- gather on Saint Thomas Churchís steps on Fifth Avenue. Itís as if they materialized out of nowhere thinking they can come out now because the darkness will conceal them.

In the morning on my way to work along 42nd Street, I still see some of them here and there. Itís as if the night is over and so they begin to disappear. But a few of them linger a while longer perhaps to observe the world they didnít belong in.

Which I think was exactly what the two homeless men in my "Bookends" series
were doing -- watching people in fancy business suits and office attires rushing to work.

When I planted my camera and tripod in front of the two homeless men and started shooting I didnít realize how uneasy they were until I looked at my shots. They kept shifting and turning this way and that between frames with one homeless man at one time putting his hand in his pocket as if to reach for something. I didnít look into their faces at the time thinking they were hostile. But later when I looked at the pictures on my computer and saw their facial expressions and movements they seemed afraid and camera-shy. Maybe, they were thinking, it wasnít such a good idea to sit in this bench after all.

I normally donít look at peopleís faces when I pass them by and am perfectly content at them being a blur in my life especially if theyíre of no concern to me. But with camera in hand and stopping by to take pictures every now and then, I begin to see the world around me crystallize. So crystal-clear in fact that sometimes I feel like I have just peered into the cityís soul.

Thanks for the compliment, Saltine713.

#41) Dorot Jewish Division, facing the entrance from the Periodicals.
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