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Old Sep 13, 2011, 3:52 PM   #1
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Default Creek and Shack in Montgomery, NY

If there is ever anyone happy about the tremendous amount of rain New York received last week where many homes were flooded and damaged, it will be from a very small minority consisting possibly of just one person -- me. I was heading toward a county park but a detour through the backwoods because of the flooded main road made me discover this creek -- raging perhaps because of the rains -- with a wooden shack beside it. I think it's picturesque enough to warrant going back to in the fall and winter.

#1) Creek.


#2) Shack.


Thank you for looking! C&C welcome.
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Old Sep 13, 2011, 6:12 PM   #2
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Lovely. Nature was on your side that day!
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Old Sep 14, 2011, 12:58 PM   #3
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Thank you, banksy.

#3) Creek and shack.


#4) Across from the shack and creek is this inscription on a rock.


I couldn't find info on the "Shaver House" in Montgomery online so I re-typed the inscription:

The Shaver House

Frederick Shaver came here from Holland in 1720. With his wife they built their stone house near the stream and set up their tannery. They were among the first Europeans to arrive this far west of the Hudson for almost two centuries. Thereafter the Shavers farmed these acres. About a century ago the main dwelling along the Old Cochecton Turnpike was abandoned and the new house built on Kaisertown Road was bought in 1930 by Kate Seredy. A talented writer, Mae Massey, her publisher, owner of the Viking Press, visited here in 1939, bought the ruins of the old house and restored it. The stone walls forming part of the rear of the house are in their original state. Edson Gillespie, the last of our local stone masons, was responsible for the reconstruction.

Paul & Kathleen O’Dwyer
1980

My wife and I presume the dirt path behind the rock leads to the Shaver House. But although there were no "no trespassing" signs, it looked private so we didn't go in. My understanding is, a site may be privately bought and registered as a national historic landmark and the private owner gets some tax breaks, but apart from that the owner isn't obliged to share it with the public.

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Old Sep 14, 2011, 6:00 PM   #4
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Oh, that is interesting... what a pity it can't be shared.
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Old Sep 15, 2011, 11:38 AM   #5
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very neat place and history
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