Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > Landscape Photos

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Feb 16, 2004, 9:59 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 824
Default

Barb, sorry to say I haven't used it (or other brands) enough yet to tell you whether its good, bad, or ugly (er, "indifferent"). It's a Kenko (standard brand here in Japan), and I bought it at Yodobashi camera in Shinjuku for about 3000 yen (pretty pricey, equivalent of about $28.00. It does work, I can definitely tell by rotating when the glare goes down, so I can recommend your getting one (not necessarily Kenko) as one more weapon in the arsenal.

As I was recently taking my Mt. Fuji pictures, I noticed a bunch of trees with green leaves shining in the direct sun, so I focused on them and rotated the polarizing filter, and could definitely see the difference; as I noted, even with the EVF, if you get the viewfinder full of the glare spot, you can tell by changing shutter speed or aperture when the polarizing filter is cutting down on the glare. Give it a try.
Norm in Fujino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 16, 2004, 10:59 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 3,652
Default

A Tiffen circular polarizer for my camera costs over $50, and the same thing by Hoya costs more than $70. Granted, my lens is a 62mm, but even the smallest Tiffen filter goes for $35, so I'd say you didn't do too badly in price.

Since my viewfinder isn't electronic, I might have a truly easy time using a polarizer. Once I pay back the household budget for the monitor and printer calibration equipment I just ordered, I should probably spring for the filter.
bcoultry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 16, 2004, 2:18 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 577
Default

Barb,

I find polarizer filters a must for landscape, water and snow photography. It reduces the reflections considerably, and gives your pictures the nice deep blue sky look. See this one, for example: http://www.pbase.com/image/21785619

I typically aim my camera with filter attached to the sky, and rotate the filter while looking through the viewfinder until I see the deepest blue. Then I compose and take the shot.

Barthold
barthold is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 16, 2004, 2:48 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 3,652
Default

Quote:
See this one, for example:
That did it. Now I know what I have to buy next. It's a good thing I don't give a rat's fanny about clothes, jewelry, shoes, etc. Cameras promote enough spending all on their own.
bcoultry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 16, 2004, 5:22 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 824
Default

Lovely shot, Barthold. The contrast of the blue and yellow is almost surreal.
Norm in Fujino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 17, 2004, 12:03 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 577
Default

Thanks!

BTW Barbara, if you have a wide-angle lens, you might consder getting a thin filter. Normal polarizer might start vignetting at the wide end. Depends on your lens and camera too (if you have a 10D as I do, then the 1.6x crop factor helps).

Barthold
barthold is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 17, 2004, 11:38 AM   #27
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 3,652
Default

Quote:
if you have a wide-angle lens
As opposed to the "normal" lens? If this is what you mean, then I'd have no problem.
bcoultry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 17, 2004, 4:00 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
stephendickey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 208
Default

Just a quick thanks to Costas and Barthold for their info regarding image merging!

I will be taking some landscape shots tomorrow and maybe I will try some blending!!!
stephendickey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 18, 2004, 3:54 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 110
Default

Thank you stephen, barthold's suggested it first.
You might like to consider a variation of contrast masking I often use to modify difficult images.

Open image
Duplicate background layer, name it Overlay
Select the background layer, duplicate it a second time and call it C_mask

You should now have 3 layers
Overlay
C_mask
Background at the bottom

Select layer C_mask by clicking on it
Set blend mode to Luminosity, opacity to 52% (this works well with opacity level of 25% to 60%)
Image/adjustments/Desaturate
Image/adjustments/Inverse
Filter/Blur/Gaussian Blur set amount to 48%

Select layer Overlay by clicking on it
Set blend mode to Overlay and Opacity of 70% (works best with opacity of 65% to 90%)

Now select the C_mask layer and adjust the opacity to give you the amount of contrast you want.

Record it as an action for ease of repeat use.

I used the above values on your image (plus a bit of sharpening) to produce this variation, but only to give you an idea of what is possible. In no way do I claim this is a better picture since only you know what you wanted to create.

You should get good results with the original. (I will post one of my own images later that needed similar work).


costas is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:03 PM.