Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > Landscape Photos

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Apr 18, 2006, 3:42 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
adnanbh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 17
Default

For all the pros and newbies, anyone can help me with tips on how to get lightening on film? How to get the focus in place, and predict the location of a good sized bolt of lightening? also, to get the light and white balance correct? help and tips appreciated!

cheers


adnanbh is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Apr 18, 2006, 5:03 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Reanimator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Huddersfield
Posts: 1,347
Default

well what id do is stick camera on a tripod, point in general direction of storm and start taking long exposure shots, length of time would deepend on a night storm of daytime storm, u mention film so its more guess work than digital as u can see results for exposure straight away and can adjust as needed

u will eventualy catch the lightning as it happens, thats the general idea behing it, u wont get shots stood there with cam in hand watching then trying to point and shoot, those who shoot lightnign a lot will take many 100's of pictures
Reanimator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 18, 2006, 9:59 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Indian Rocks Beach, FL
Posts: 4,036
Default

It is pretty easy at night if your camera isn't a simple point and shoot. Put it on a tripod and just keep taking long exposures with the focus set on infinity. You extend the exposure time with a small aperture.

It is trickier in the daytime. I think a neutral density filter and a small aperture (large number) might help keep the shutter open longer, but it is usually just a matter of luck and persistence. In the daytime digital is much better than film as you can take a couple hundred shots at no cost for film and developing.

You mention both film and white balance so I have no idea what you are using.

slipe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 18, 2006, 2:07 PM   #4
E.T
Senior Member
 
E.T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 921
Default

If you want to try getting day lightnings that's very hard because you can use only short exposures.

But you could get help from these.
http://www.solorb.com/elect/lightning/index.html
http://www.astro.uni-bonn.de/~kbagschi/blitze.shtml
E.T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 18, 2006, 11:50 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
joeybob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Pittsburgh, Pa.
Posts: 148
Default

As far as lightning goes... Set focus to infinity and set the aperature to as tight as it will go and then experiment... The slower your film the longer you can leave your shutter open. I have taken pictures of lightning at night lens open for ~ 30 seconds or more - up to a several minutes and daytime w/ lens open for ~ 15 seconds. Of course a manual shutter release helps - Oh yes - so does a tripod...

Here is a shot I took last week w/my D50 (digital) at night - Nikon D50

Lens: 18-55mm F/3.5-5.6 G
Focal Length: 18mm
Exposure Mode: Manual
Metering Mode: Multi-Pattern
30 sec - F/16
Exposure Comp.: 0 EV
Sensitivity: ISO 400
Oh yes - and this shot is very cropped - the lightning that night was not predicatable as to where it was firing so I had my lens open to it's widest angle... In other words - you are only seeing 1/2 of the picture...

Practice - try photographing a lit candle in a dark room, photograph cars on the street at night, take pictures of things at night - it's not too hard...
Attached Images
 
joeybob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 19, 2006, 12:03 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
joeybob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Pittsburgh, Pa.
Posts: 148
Default

Here is one more - same night/same settings - enhanced (looks grainy) and cropped...
Attached Images
 
joeybob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 19, 2006, 6:21 AM   #7
Junior Member
 
adnanbh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 17
Default

Thanks a lot everyone, and yes, i also got a M410R, with variable shutter speeds, that can be used to take similar pics. The problem, i guess, is that it can only open the shutter for 8secs max. Thanks for all the tips

cheers


adnanbh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 19, 2006, 8:22 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Reanimator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Huddersfield
Posts: 1,347
Default

8 seconds shouldnt be much of a prob, just means u may have to take more pics
Reanimator is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 2:40 AM.