Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > Landscape Photos

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Aug 7, 2006, 9:12 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Tom Overton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 1,458
Default

Approximately 40 minute exposure. We're about five miles from town, but still there's a lot of light pollution.
Cheers,
Tom
Attached Images
 
Tom Overton is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Aug 8, 2006, 1:19 PM   #2
Log
Senior Member
 
Log's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 394
Default

this is awesome... mind sharing how you did it and with what?

-Logan
Log is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 9, 2006, 1:26 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
John Maddock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,663
Default

I like it :-)

Shows up how far north you are with the almost-full circle there!

John.
John Maddock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 10, 2006, 7:54 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Tom Overton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 1,458
Default

Log wrote:
Quote:
this is awesome... mind sharing how you did it and with what?

-Logan
Thanks for the comment, Logan. I don't think you can do this with a digicam, but I may be mistaken. You need to be able to lock your shutter open for long exposures - I don't mean 30 seconds long, I mean 30 minutes to an hour. (I've actually seen some pretty impressive 8-hour exposures)

What I also like with shots like this is that you can see the different coloured stars. There'sa lot ofred and blue up there which you can't really see with naked eye.

This was shot with a Nikon N80 film camera using Fuji superia 200 film. The effect would actually be better with slower film as there would be less aparent grain. I made the mistake of trying this with 800 film once... very messy.

John, actually this shows how far South I am, (lat. 42... about as far south you can get in Canada) because the North Star, Polaris, is so close to the horizon. Because it lies so close to the Earth's axis, Polaris appears to be stationary while the other stars wheel around it.

Thanks again, folks. Shooting film, I haven't been spending as much time on the computer and I've been away from Steve's for quite awhile.

Cheers,
Tom

Tom Overton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 10, 2006, 8:21 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
thekman620's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 6,084
Default

Nice shot Tom. This would really excell if you could find a darker place away from cities......cheers.....Don.
thekman620 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 10, 2006, 2:58 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 54
Default

Great shot! These kinds of shots are one of the reasons I've gotten into SLR photography recently. I've always been into astronomy, and I have always wanted to make my own exposures.



Personally, I think the light pollution adds a little more effect to it. I know it's not exactly what you were hoping for but the dramatic effect of the city lights clearly shows why our communities need to be investing in low sodium lights which limit the light pollution, and also working to prevent urban sprawl. I live about 50 miles from Palomar Observatory here in Southern California, which has a 200 inch telescope. The images that came out of that large of a scope used to be spectacular. Now because of encroachment of the nearby communities of Temecula and Escondido, the telescope is virtually useless for what it used to used for. The same has happened to Griffith Observatory and Mt. Wilson Observatory in LA.



But I just went backpacking for a few days recently on Mt. San Jacinto, near Palm Springs. I waskicking myself for not bringing all my stuff. The forecasts called for rain and clouds,but it was perfectly clear up there at the 10,000 foot elevation. The amount of stars you can easily see in the thin air, with no light pollution is unbelievable. I'm hoping to head back sometime this year to get some good shots.



Christopher

cyancey76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 11, 2006, 7:54 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
LadyhawkVA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 2,374
Default

Over the past few months I've toyed with the idea of getting a film SLR. When I saw this photo last week, I made up my mind and got the Canon Rebel T2. As Christopher noted, this photo is a nice example of some of the advantages of film cameras. Having said that, my husband recently bought the Canon Rebel XT. I noticed that it has a bulb setting, but he hasn't tried it yet.

I'm still waiting to get my first two rolls of photos back, but so far I love the way the T2 handles. I got that model because it's compatible with my husband's lenses. It's basically the film version of the XT.

I still like my FZ20 and intend to use it quite a lot. After all, I can shoot freely and experimentally with a digital and not worry about cost. And I certainly would not have learned as much as I have as quickly as I have without a digital. The instant feedback is a great learning tool.

Still, I think using film sometimes will force me to be more thoughtful about every photo I take. That should be a good thing.

LadyhawkVA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 11, 2006, 8:05 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Tom Overton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 1,458
Default

Thanks, Christopher. I always kick myself when I don't bring the right kit along. It's usually a snap decision... and so often the wrong choice.

Where I live, on the shores of Lake Erie, is actually pretty good for night time photography... unless I want shots of the North Star. We are surrounded by water for at least 300 degrees of the compass, so all around us are "quiet" skies. Point Pelee National Park (a mile from our house) has a dark sky policy; all exterior lighting is shielded so that the overhead sky is not disturbed. This is to prevent any disruption to the migration patterns of the thousands of birds that cross Lake Erie at night. It's just that one area, directly to our north, which suffers from any serious light pollution. I've enjoyed a lot of summer evenings with my camera set up on the beach.

Thanks again.

Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada.
www.tomoverton.myphotoalbum.com

Tom Overton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 11, 2006, 8:26 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Tom Overton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 1,458
Default

LadyhawkVA wrote:
Quote:
Over the past few months I've toyed with the idea of getting a film SLR. When I saw this photo last week, I made up my mind and got the Canon Rebel T2. As Christopher noted, this photo is a nice example of some of the advantages of film cameras. Having said that, my husband recently bought the Canon Rebel XT. I noticed that it has a bulb setting, but he hasn't tried it yet.

I'm still waiting to get my first two rolls of photos back, but so far I love the way the T2 handles. I got that model because it's compatible with my husband's lenses. It's basically the film version of the XT.

I still like my FZ20 and intend to use it quite a lot. After all, I can shoot freely and experimentally with a digital and not worry about cost. And I certainly would not have learned as much as I have as quickly as I have without a digital. The instant feedback is a great learning tool.

Still, I think using film sometimes will force me to be more thoughtful about every photo I take. That should be a good thing.

Thanks, Ladyhawk.

I'll just warn you that you're on a slippery slope. I find that film is almost addicting. It's a good idea to get an SLR that is compatible with your whole system. (It won't stop you from buying more than you need, though.:lol I'm at the point of deciding whether to get into my own chemical processing right now. I used to do a little in high school. It's time to take a refresher course.

Yes, shooting film does force you to be more thoughtful, which we should be all the time anyway, but digital is too easy in that respect. A good way to train yourself to trust your eye is to turn off the review function of your digital camera... Use it sparingly to confirm what you conceived as your shot.

Thanks again, and enjoy both your cameras.

Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada.
http://www.tomoverton.myphotoalbum.com

Tom Overton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 11, 2006, 8:47 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
LadyhawkVA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 2,374
Default

A local high school is offering a course in b&w darkroom processing this fall. I love good b&w photos, so I'm seriously considering taking it. I don't like using the b&w setting on my digital camera and I'm getting tired of the time I spend tweaking digital photos on the computer. I'm getting my film photos burned onto CDs, so I'll soon find out whether I spend much time playing with those digital files too.
LadyhawkVA is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 7:25 AM.