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Old Dec 28, 2004, 10:16 PM   #11
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Bikini - Auto (F3.5 / ISO 120) with flash
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Old Dec 28, 2004, 10:26 PM   #12
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Finally got em back up. If anyone can tell me how to add multiple attachments to a message, please do. I could only seem to add one at a time.



1. Yes, they are definately soft. I was shooting indoors with no flash in most of them, and I don't have a steady hand OR a tripod. I definately have the latter on my list. Until then, I'm not sure what I can do aside from a lot more light, which is pretty hard to come by at my place. At one point while shooting, I actually plugged in some extra lamps in the room to give more light, and it still wasn't enough to bring the level up to what I wanted. Until I get a tripod or better lighting, is there really anything I can do for the blurriness?



2. The backgroundsARE lousy. I never know when I'll be able to convince my wife to pose for me, and when it happens, I have to act quick since Idon't want to lose her. Any recommendations, or specific things (ok, the tv obviously) I can do to make the backgrounds better? I'm talking quick and easy tips.



Thanks!
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Old Dec 29, 2004, 12:51 AM   #13
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d16tuner wrote:
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Finally got em back up. If anyone can tell me how to add multiple attachments to a message, please do. I could only seem to add one at a time.

1. Yes, they are definately soft. I was shooting indoors with no flash in most of them, and I don't have a steady hand OR a tripod. I definately have the latter on my list. Until then, I'm not sure what I can do aside from a lot more light, which is pretty hard to come by at my place. At one point while shooting, I actually plugged in some extra lamps in the room to give more light, and it still wasn't enough to bring the level up to what I wanted. Until I get a tripod or better lighting, is there really anything I can do for the blurriness?

2. The backgrounds ARE lousy. I never know when I'll be able to convince my wife to pose for me, and when it happens, I have to act quick since I don't want to lose her. Any recommendations, or specific things (ok, the tv obviously) I can do to make the backgrounds better? I'm talking quick and easy tips.

Thanks!
Wow...lot's of questions here.

1. Multiple attachments:
You need to have your images already on-line at a site that will allow you to hot-link to them (like you tried to do the first time).

2. No steady hands? Try this... http://www.bytephoto.com/forums/show...=&threadid=446

3. Better lighting can be had by looking at the posts in the Studio Lighting Forum (you can do wonders with $25.00).

4. Backgrounds:
Rather than trying to make her pose, move yourself to a position so the background is better (solid is good, plants, something far away, etc). If you can't do that, increase your f-stop (to the smallest possible number)...that should help to blur the background.
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Old Dec 29, 2004, 2:28 AM   #14
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The first and last picture are the ones you should have posted, they are the ones that really jump out.
Very nice model you have make her at ease for modeling and you should do ok.

If you start out with the onboard flash or a flash on cameratry to aim it at the ceiling, when you can't do that tie some tissue's for the flash to make the light softer.

Try to work on posing, a mediocre picture with bad backgrounds and a strong pose allready looks like a superb shot sometimes .

I would love to see more.


Greetings,
Frank
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Old Dec 29, 2004, 3:04 AM   #15
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I took a look at the review for your camera and couldn't see a timed shutter release in the specs. If it does have one you could experiment using that, resting the camera on a solid object.It might help eliminate camera shake, and give a sharper pic if you don't like using the flash. How about hanging a sheet for a solid background? Good of you to mention this is your wife. Now we know there ought to be some continuity and you can collaborate to enhance your skills. Have you given any thoughts to experimenting with photo software? I see you are new toSteve's looking at the date you joined. While any replies you recieve will no doubt be useful, if you browse though the past posts in this topic, if you haven't already...you'll see you have already benefitted from being tutored by some very knowledgeable photographers. Great site to learn from...( I consider myself a somewhat knowledgeable newb, and n o t in that league) Best regards,

KennethD
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Old Dec 29, 2004, 11:47 AM   #16
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Thanks for the helpful suggestions everyone. When I first signed up to the forum, I think I probably read over 25% of thetechnical posts in one day! I also read almost all of the info at Hertz-Ladiges.com which is an awesome site for a newb like me. My problem is I can't remember it all! But I think by reading and rereading this stuff and trying to practice it when I can, it'll eventually sink in. I'll definately try to remember some of the tips you guys have mentioned.



KENNETHD wrote:
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I took a look at the review for your camera and couldn't see a timed shutter release in the specs. If it does have one you could experiment using that, resting the camera on a solid object.It might help eliminate camera shake, and give a sharper pic if you don't like using the flash. How about hanging a sheet for a solid background? Good of you to mention this is your wife. Now we know there ought to be some continuity and you can collaborate to enhance your skills. Have you given any thoughts to experimenting with photo software? I see you are new toSteve's looking at the date you joined. While any replies you recieve will no doubt be useful, if you browse though the past posts in this topic, if you haven't already...you'll see you have already benefitted from being tutored by some very knowledgeable photographers. Great site to learn from... ( I consider myself a somewhat knowledgeable newb, and n o t in that league) Best regards,

KennethD


Actually, while it doesnt' feature shutter or aperature priority, it does have a manual mode which lets you set both to your liking, altho the aperature only features two settings. The shutter can be set from 1/1000 to 30 seconds. It uses noise reduction for anything longer than 1/8. I usually shoot (when in manual) with the smallest aperature my current zoom will allow (2.8-5.2). I can't decide whether it is better to just use wide and crop to what I want, or use the zoom and suffer a higher f-stop. I guess Ideally I would use wide and move myself physically to frame the picture, but zoom is so much easier and quicker! Does that make any sense? I hope I'm understanding it right.


As far as the background is concerned, I know it isn't as good as taking it right the first time, and I'm not totally comfortable with the thought of digitally altering a 'real, actual' photograph yet (seems like cheating), but would you say this is an improvement? Because it is easy enough to do in a pinch...

Left is original, right is modified.
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Old Dec 29, 2004, 6:33 PM   #17
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Ah...first rate! You're honing your skills. Despite the comments I made about the backgrounds, this is one I find pleasing without altering the background, for the following reason. The tones and colors in the background...excepting the shadow, are all very similair, and do not compete for attention away from the model, in my opinion. But experimenting with this is always a good thing. Just preserve the original of course. If I had an opportunity to reshoot I would. But only to improve the focus on the subject. If you can find a solid stick like object suitable in length, you can improvise and rest the camera on itimitating the function of a tripod to some degree of success. You'll have to be flexible with your grip and practise a bit. It will reduce the camera motion considerably. Digital cameras are an amazing tool for experimenting. Shoot as many shots as you can, for even getting your subject to make a small change, like rotating her torso a few degrees, or her head just a bit in steps as you complete a series of pics, allows light to change shadows or illuminate differently. That can allow you to see for yourself what effects you like or dislike, and how you got them. I know these are very basic ideas. There are advantages to repeating them. It costs nothing. It allows you to become familiar with your camera. It builds your knowledge of cause and effect, photographically speaking. Whatever you learn from these simple exercises you can apply to more elaborate setups later. Reverse engineering has its place in photography. By examining the results of test situations and noting the setup involvedyou can back track and successfully repeat the desired results. Best regards, I hope I am not being too basic for you, I just believe that how you master basics will determine how well you use more elaborate equipment and setups, later...and determines to a large degree how well you'll succeed overall.

KennethD


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Old Dec 29, 2004, 8:42 PM   #18
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you have a lovely wife she is a natural....i would suggest that if you don't have a flash try out doors but lower your exposer to -1 ...but indoors you should use a bounce flash..pointed at the ceiling and just keep shooting .....until you get that perfect shoot
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Old Dec 30, 2004, 8:52 AM   #19
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Hello all,

I wanted to thank you for your kind remarks about me.

I am glad you like the pictures. My husband does a good job shooting!:|

I am sure we will post more!

sincerely,

the wife (model)
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Old Dec 30, 2004, 12:39 PM   #20
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Very nice series, D16tuner!

One thing you may want to consider is a circular polarizer filter for your digcam.

It would help enchance the colors and vividness, I believe,of your photo of Fawn outside (in tube top and skirt).

The love shows...both behind and in front of your lens!




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