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Old Jan 24, 2005, 7:05 PM   #1
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Well,

This was my first foray into portrait photography and I would appreciate any suggestions - I've seen some great work here, so I'm hoping you can help me...










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Old Jan 24, 2005, 7:35 PM   #2
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You're starting with a great model/subject. Move some light around the room and warm up the white balance, then post some more.


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Old Jan 24, 2005, 8:47 PM   #3
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Very nice. I can't help you(Kalypso and Frank will)

But i think with practiceyou will get better and better, so keep them coming.
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Old Jan 24, 2005, 9:20 PM   #4
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Try a solid background (or shoot with a larger Aperture so the background isn't quite in focus). Also, remember that the subject doesn't need to always be centered (some rule of thirds thingy).

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Old Jan 25, 2005, 12:49 AM   #5
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I tried a crop...hope you don't mind. Try moving her further from the wall to throw it out of focus, too. Beautiful girl!
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Old Jan 25, 2005, 2:52 AM   #6
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Very nice first try, the fourth has the most attraction to me as a photo offcourse .

The background is not very nice here, try to OR include the whole background OR place your model that the area of the background you use enhances the lines in the photo, now it's just something in the back which draw's my eye everytime.

When playing with lingerie it's very important to watch the poses.
Now she almost everytime looking at the camera from a strange angle or from behind, try to make that more direct.

Also experiment with posing.
Do not just lie down the model and shoot, but really try to get a pose watch the lines in the body and arms and try to balance this, lines are the most important thing in a shot.

Also remember that on photo's arround 30-40% of the power of a pose is lost, so OVERACT .

Have fun, would be happy to see some more.

Greetings,
Frank
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Old Jan 25, 2005, 7:28 AM   #7
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Thank you all for your advice so far. I've been steadily learning the science of photography but alas the ART is the toughest part for me. Most of these were taken with a f4.0 - in a couple months I'd like to pick up the canon 50 1.8 since it's so inexpensive and that will help me obtain better bokeh. Unfortunately I just don't have money or space for a studio so lighting is going to be a continuous problem. But you've given me some great things to think about. Frank, your advice is probably going to be the toughest for me with regards to balancing lines and poses - is there perhaps a book where I could better learn about how to pose a model?

On the plus side, I know my model will be available for more shoots - she's my wife
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Old Jan 25, 2005, 12:28 PM   #8
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Wifes are great material .
No good books, just look and learn from your shots.
There are some books on posing but most I find are too simple or filled with things you allready know.

Some good are from rotovision.
Or you can try posing guides.
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Old Jan 25, 2005, 2:17 PM   #9
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...or there are always the "other books" -- like Cosmopolitan, GQ, Vanity Fair, Maxim, SI Swimsuit ed., Playboy, etc. Indeed, those photographers often have the benefits of a studio (like Frank) professional stylists and assistants, etc., but the pictures there are often quite interesting, demonstrate unique composition and posing, etc.

One wise person here (Frank?) said when you're starting with a model, find other pictures that you like and then try to replicate them... that gives you ideas and a starting place.

But what do I know... the closest I get to a girl is passing one in my car on the way to work... :blah:
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Old Jan 25, 2005, 2:28 PM   #10
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Love those midwestern women.. I didn't have much trouble focusing on her though the background is a bit distracting. Your wife looks like she could be very camera friendly so she is where the attention should be. A beautiful woman doesn't need props for the pictures to pop. This is, of course, just my opinion.

Re studio equipment.. You would be suprised at what you can do with a couple hundred $$. Floods, such as Smith Victor, and backdrops can be had relatively cheap at the get go. You might try ebay.. Just a thought..

Jeff
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