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Old Jul 3, 2003, 12:10 PM   #11
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DON'T BUY A DISK LARGER THAN 40Gb WITH THIS DEVICE. YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE TO USE IT.

DON'T EVEN TRY TO GO PAST THE 32Gb BARRIER.
Oeehhhmmm ... what?

My XdriveII uses full 40 gb ... and I think, also 60 and 80 gb hds works well.

I installed driver, put it out of the box, connected it and since I never had a problem with different memory cards, as external hd or external card reader.
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Old Jul 5, 2003, 1:27 PM   #12
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I agree that the X'S-Drive II can be used with capacities greater than 32GB BUT you will need in this case to format ONCE only the XSdrive via a different computer than Windows XP (if you use Windows XP)

And that should be too difficult.

I'm wondering why there is this limitation from Microsoft on Windows XP to format FAT Hard disks...
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Old Jul 5, 2003, 2:15 PM   #13
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Windows XP doesn't allow to format HD with capacities higher than 35GB
ummm, yeah it does
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Old Jul 5, 2003, 3:27 PM   #14
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I'm curious as to why there is a burning need for such mega big drives for portable storage? Surely this is not for Archive?

As the slack space starts pushing up (rapidly), the drive access gets slower, capacity reduces, and the FAT table held in memory to access the file chains quickly gets HUGE.

I used to format my pc drives as a single partition, until I had a drive fault and lost access to everything. Now I keep the partitions to managable cluster sizes, within the reasonable capabilities of the OS and the cam file sizes I'm using, across partitioned drives. My OS resides in a separate partition. This is the one that has most file transfers, read accesses, might go faulty etc etc.

What does X'S Drive11 say about defragmenting, formatting or recovering a single partition on a 40Gb drive? I suspect it takes forever, specially across a usb interface.

Don't forget, these big drives might appear to work well at the moment, but you're fooling yourselves, you haven't filled them up yet with lots of relatively small cam files and experienced the slower accesses and reduced battery time. One day you may have a drive crash, so it's worth thinking now about the task of future recovery or moving 40Gb + of full drive to something else.
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Old Jul 5, 2003, 3:59 PM   #15
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Voxmagna.

For normal shooting use it might seem a bit much, but when shooting in raw modes 20GB is mighty quick filled up.

Take for instance myself, I shoot pictures in JPEG from app. 2.5 MB when I go out for a day with my son and wife to a amusment park I easily shoot arround 1 GB of pictures, don't even talk about going to the zoo. And this is all in ONE day .

When I go on holiday which I actually never do :? I think 10GB will be very quickly filled and thats with 2.5MB per picture.

Offcourse when comming home you will delete all the bad ones, but that's the fun with digital.

Greetings,
Frank
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Old Jul 5, 2003, 4:39 PM   #16
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Frank.... thanks, I could see the point shooting RAW or TIFF, but that's one heck of a lot of pics! I think I'd go moviecam if I was up to that many! I've just thought of the answer to my points about the X's11 big drive issue.

It needs a caddy slot so you can poke in 2.5" HDD's like big CF's, also take advantage of the smaller drive price breakpoints as well. Put a caddy in your pc and you can pull files out and do all the disc maintenance as well - USB not required!

PS did you know if you use the word S_U_C_K (as in pulling out files) in your post it gets deleted? VOX
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Old Jul 6, 2003, 9:31 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macleod76
Quote:
Windows XP doesn't allow to format HD with capacities higher than 35GB
ummm, yeah it does
Why the smilies? We're you being sarcastic????

Can you tell me why I get that message then:

C:\Documents and Settings\root>format H: /q /fs:fat32
Insert new disk for drive H:
and press ENTER when ready...
The type of the file system is FAT32.
QuickFormatting 38146M
The volume is too big for FAT32.


/Chris
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Old Jul 6, 2003, 12:16 PM   #18
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Well this is what I can do:

Formats a disk for use with Windows 2000.

FORMAT volume [/FS:file-system] [/V:label] [/Q] [/A:size] [/C] [/X]
FORMAT volume [/V:label] [/Q] [/F:size]
FORMAT volume [/V:label] [/Q] [/T:tracks /N:sectors]
FORMAT volume [/V:label] [/Q] [/1] [/4]
FORMAT volume [/Q] [/1] [/4] [/8]

volume Specifies the drive letter (followed by a colon),
mount point, or volume name.
/FS:filesystem Specifies the type of the file system (FAT, FAT32, or NTFS).
/V:label Specifies the volume label.
/Q Performs a quick format.
/C Files created on the new volume will be compressed by
default.
/X Forces the volume to dismount first if necessary. All opened
handles to the volume would no longer be valid.
/A:size Overrides the default allocation unit size. Default settings
are strongly recommended for general use.
NTFS supports 512, 1024, 2048, 4096, 8192, 16K, 32K, 64K.
FAT supports 512, 1024, 2048, 4096, 8192, 16K, 32K, 64K,
(128K, 256K for sector size > 512 bytes).
FAT32 supports 512, 1024, 2048, 4096, 8192, 16K, 32K, 64K,
(128K, 256K for sector size > 512 bytes).

Note that the FAT and FAT32 files systems impose the
following restrictions on the number of clusters on a volume:

FAT: Number of clusters <= 65526
FAT32: 65526 < Number of clusters < 268435446

Format will immediately stop processing if it decides that
the above requirements cannot be met using the specified
cluster size.


NTFS compression is not supported for allocation unit sizes
above 4096.
/F:size Specifies the size of the floppy disk to format (160,
180, 320, 360, 640, 720, 1.2, 1.23, 1.44, 2.88, or 20.8).
/T:tracks Specifies the number of tracks per disk side.
/N:sectors Specifies the number of sectors per track.
/1 Formats a single side of a floppy disk.
/4 Formats a 5.25-inch 360K floppy disk in a
high-density drive.
/8 Formats eight sectors per track.[/color]

Working on a 256K cluster size, Say you're saving circa 2 mb compressed 6Mpix files, for each pic, about a quarter of your drive space could be slack space. So your 60Gb drive might look like 45Gb - and ooooh so much slower and battery thirsty. Fine for storing big TIFFs and continuous movies though!!
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Old Jun 11, 2009, 6:31 AM   #19
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had this problem with XsII yesterday - the command options just would not do the job - after hours of trying I found a programme called Easeus Partition Master which is free for home use and did the job without a whimper in 2 minutes . Now if I could update the Xs firmware to recognise high capacity HD cards....
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