Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Memory Cards, Microdrives, Card Readers

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Feb 17, 2007, 3:37 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
Hayward's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,318
Default

I have had digital cameras since 1997, and back then they were PAINFULLY slow RS-232 serial interfaces. (dispite small 1MP pix)

I hav always used card readers... in fact when going to sell old cameras, usually couldn't even find the cables, as never used and stashed somewhere.

Just faster and more convenient... plus as mentioned no drain on cam batteries.
Hayward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 17, 2007, 10:04 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,572
Default

The computer doesn't care whether you're downloading images from the camera or a card reader. The driver that is required to download images from the card in your camera tells the computer to treat the camera as if it were a card reader anyway.

The camera cares, because it needs to be turned on in order for the computer to read the card. So if the camera isn't running from its AC adapter, it's draining the batteries. Card readers, on the other hand, are usually powered from the computer's USB port anyway (or from a self-powered USB hub. Otherwise, you may need to use a power supply with your card reader. But either way, we're not talking about consuming consumables. Except in a larger sense.)

Do you care?

1. If you use multiple cards to store your photos, wouldn't it be easier to swap cards in a card reader than in your camera?

2. Connectors wear out. The primary cause of failures in computer systems is, by far,faulty connectors. Do you want to wear out the connectors on a $20 card reader or on a $200 camera?

3. Suppose you want to connect your camera to someone else's computer. If your camera requires that the computer have a special driver installed that is only available from the CD that came with the camera, you'll need to carry that CD around with you so you can install that driver on their computer.

(This actually happened to a client of mine. His daughter used her digicam to take some pictures, and he wanted to take the camera to his office to print the pictures on a color laser printer. The camera couldn't be connected to a computer without a driver that was only available from the CD that was distributed with the camera. The driver couldn't even be downloaded from the manufacturer's website; only updates were available for download.) (In the interest of propriety, I will not disclose the name of the camera manufacturer, except to say that it's initials are H. P.)

4.Some cameras use proprietary cable connectors. If you might need to connect your camera to someone else's computer, do you want to carry around all the camera's accessories everywhere you go? Or do you just want to carry around a card reader?

These (and others, no doubt) are all issues you'll have to address before you can make an informed decision.

I use a card reader.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 17, 2007, 12:06 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Davenport, IA
Posts: 2,093
Default

Right on, TCav
ac.smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 5, 2007, 11:50 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 163
Default

use the card reader, and dont listen to anyone who tells you not to.
1st, you save camera's battery life; 2nd, u could continue to use camera; 3rd no software to install (such as the awful Kodak's EasyShare); 4th you could WRITE TO
the card(pics, text, etc.) and use it for temp storage.


romphotog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 6, 2007, 9:52 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
ruchai's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 287
Default

I have 4GB card in my D200. To load all the files to my computer is too much work. I usually culling my files with card reader. As i took my pictures in RAW and taking picture of birds with 5 F/S burst. This way I do not have to load all those files I shall not keep.
ruchai is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 7, 2007, 9:33 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 851
Default

TCav wrote:
Quote:
2. Connectors wear out. The primary cause of failures in computer systems is, by far,*faulty connectors. Do you want to wear out the connectors on a $20 card reader or on a $200 camera?
Yes connections do wear out, but usually through user miss use, rather than connection failure. I am a programmer and network administrator, and the ONLY connection failures I see are through miss use. So when inserting a memory card (ESPECIALLY when inserting), do not force it. If it does not slide in fairly effortlessly, then stop and remove it. If you have to apply too much pressure, then something is not right and to continue will most likely damage something (this is the most common kind of miss use, and while it does result in a connector failure, it is caused by the user, not an out and out failure of the connector itself).

Think about this - for every removal and insertion of the memory card from the camera, you also have to have a removal and insertion into the card reader. So the useage here is the same.

Now the card reader is stand alone and can be permanently left connected to your computer. You can use it instantly, no getting your camera and finding it's connection cable and then actually connecting it to the computer.

Today, most of us have multiple memory cards. With the card reader permanantly attached, we can pop a memory card into the reader to see what is on it, or pop the card of a friend in to take a look or download their photos.

If you have more than one camera, it is possible they do not use the same type of memory card. As the card reader can handle most types of memory cards, no problem. Just insert it into the reader and Bob's your uncle.
amazingthailand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 9, 2007, 8:34 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,572
Default

amazingthailand wrote:
Quote:
TCav wrote:
Quote:
2. Connectors wear out. The primary cause of failures in computer systems is, by far,faulty connectors. Do you want to wear out the connectors on a $20 card reader or on a $200 camera?
Yes connections do wear out, but usually through user miss use, rather than connection failure.
Over thirty years ago, it was standard practice for a technician diagnosing a failed computer, to replace each circuit board until the computer started working again. IBM wanted to know exactly which components on the boards were failing, so they could increase the reliability of their computers and peripherals. So they had their field repair technicians send all failed boards to a centeral repair depot. Technicians there would test the boards to find the component or components on the boards that actually failed.

The technicians at the repair depot found that over 90% of the boards they received actually worked perfectly. It was the connections that were failing. If the field repair technician had simply removed the board and reinstalled it, the computer would have worked perfectly.

Connections fail. In fact, the less often a user unplugs a connection, the more likely it isto fail. Contacts oxidize. Gold Oxide and Copper Oxide have much higher dielectrics thatGold and Copper. Removing and reinstalling a PCI card will cause a newer, better connection between the contacts on the board and the contacts on the planar. Static electricity builds up in peripherals. Unplugging a USB cable and reinserting it, will allow a computer to re-establish communications with a peripheral.

Connections fail. All by themselves.

That is, by far, the most common problem I've seen with computers.

amazingthailand, you must have some really ham-handed users.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 9, 2007, 8:57 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 851
Default

Thirty years ago, huh! That would put us back in the 70's.
Okay, then , that certainly solves the problem.
amazingthailand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 9, 2007, 10:02 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,572
Default

amazingthailand wrote:
Quote:
Thirty years ago, huh! That would put us back in the 70's.
Okay, then , that certainly solves the problem.
So, how has connector technology improved over the last thirty years?

There was that brief period when we tried to use lead contacts instead of gold. That was based on the presumption that, even though lead wasn't a very good conductor of electricity,it was more maliable and would form a broader, gas-tightcontact, but the environmentalists put a stop to that. Plus, you could only insert it once.

So how is the connection ona PCIe slot in a Core 2 Duo computer better than the connection on an S100 bussslot in an 8080 computer? How is the connection on a USB cable better than the connection on a Centronix cable?
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 9, 2007, 4:07 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 851
Default

Yawn!
amazingthailand is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:32 PM.