Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Memory Cards, Microdrives, Card Readers

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 22, 2007, 1:20 PM   #11
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 12
Default

I have tried another card in the reader and Ranish does not recognise that one either. I'm not 100% but when Ranish loads, I am prompted about the various drivers to initialise, and one of them refers to a USB driver which seems to be unselected by default. My problem is that I am on the road in Vietnam, so only have my laptop to work with, and unfortunately when Ranish runs through this process the driver for the touch-pad mouse is not installed prior to the config screen for the USB devices, so i cannot physically modify the setting for the USB config - not even with the keyboard - see the image below.

For this reason I have been trying to find a computer in an Internet cafe which I can hyjack to test this. It might be off the mark, but it seems like a reasonable deduction to me. Anyway, no luck so far.

Right, in terms of Knoppix, it does recognise the card reader with a 'good' card in, however when the dud card is installed, it hangs when trying to mount the drive. So obviously given this, the testdisk utility wouldn't work right? If this is the case I presume I need something that can analyse the card at a lower level?

In terms of installing a distro on my laptop, not really something I want to get into while I'm on the road, so I'm now looking for another bootable distro that has support for NTFS and some sort of data recovery utility. Any ideas?

Attached Images
 
Flasher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 22, 2007, 1:29 PM   #12
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

From my copy of the Ultimate Boot CD, all I need to do is boot into it and select Ranish from the File System menus and it sees my USB Attached Sandisk Reader that way without doing anything else.

If it's not seeing your reader with a known good card, it may not have the drivers installed it needs for the card reader.

Quote:
Right, in terms of Knoppix, it does recognise the card reader with a 'good' card in, however when the dud card is installed, it hangs when trying to mount the drive.
Good. That means Knoppix has the drivers it needs to see your card reader OK.

Run testdisk from Konsole and see if it sees your bad card. Testdisk is probably preinstalled. If so, analyze it (you'll see an analyze menu choice after you select the card) and see what it finds. If it's not there, see my last post for instructions on installing it.

su
testdisk

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 22, 2007, 2:06 PM   #13
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 12
Default

OK, I can see the bad card info: 996MB FAT16 etc. I tried to look at the partition but it gave an error message. I suppose this is positive because it confirms the card is OK physically right? Anyway, what's the plan from this point? I mean, can I recreate the MBR and then format, or will Linux create something incompatible with FAT16?
Flasher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 22, 2007, 2:06 PM   #14
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

What do you mean by look at it? Did you try the Analyse choice or are you referring to trying to mount it?

If testdisk sees the card, select it from the list and you'll have a screen that looks like this one. I selected the drive for a Sandisk 2GB Ultra II in a Sandisk USB reader.

Use the Analyze menu choice after you select it.





Select Continue when prompted and you'll get to a screen like this one.

If it sees a lost partition on the drive, you can recover it. This is what I end up with Analyzing a healthy card.




After making needed changes and press Enter, you'll come to a screen that lets you write the partition structure back to it:



Try that to make sure it doesn't see any deleted or lost partitions first (and just use the arrow to change it to primary bootable and it should work if everything else is right).

Then, see if the card is recognized OK (and you may need to remove and insert it again).

If not, try using the MBR menu choice you'll have after selecting the card to rewrite the MBR. Then, remove and insert the card and see if it's mountable.

If not, see if you can recover the files using photorec. Now, with Linux, you'd have to navigate to a mounted NTFS partition to use it in order to run photorec (so it has a place to store the files). By default, files will be saved to the partition you're running it from. That's where it would start to get tricky, depending on whether or not ntfs-3g was installed on the knoppix live cd. But, if you can get the partition table and/or MBR fixed with testdisk, you could probably run the recovery utilities from Windows OK then if that's why it's driver is hanging.

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 22, 2007, 2:13 PM   #15
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 12
Default

Yeah, I mean analyse failed. Sorry, it's a pain, because I keep having to restart my machine to boot into Linux.
Flasher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 22, 2007, 2:44 PM   #16
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

If the Analyse is failing, it's probably a bad component in the card versus a corrupted mbr/partition table, etc.

Did you try rewriting the MBR to see if it fails, too?

You may still be able to make a copy of it and fix and recover from the copy on a good drive, even if it can't write back to the MBR on your card because it's damaged, with most utilities quiting when they see a read error.

Do this to install and run dd_rescue (I'm assuming you have internet access from Knoppix). The package name in debian software repositories for installing it is ddrescue. But, you have to run it using dd_rescue from a Konsole. I'd see if it can create an image from it before giving up. Then, you can try to fix and recover from a copy. See if it's already there first (see the article link below and try using dd_rescue). If not, you can probably install it like this:

su
apt-get update
apt-get install ddrescue

Here's an article on how to use it to copy the contents to an image file. You can run fdisk -l to see your drive/partition names.

su
fdisk -l

You'll need to give dd_rescue it the correct info for your card (that's what you'll need to run fdisk -l to get) in place of what you see in the article and correct place to save it.

The problem is that you're going to need a place to save it to. Your knoppix version may or may not have ntfs-3g installed and let you write to an NTFS partition. If it will, you should be able to use photorec to get the files after mounting the image.

Article on using dd_rescue

If it is running too slow from errors (provided it can see it at all), you can also use an alternative known as ddrescue (without the underscore). The debian package name for it is gddrescue (it's known as gnu ddrescue). ddrescue is better at skipping errors compared to dd_rescue

su
apt-get update
apt-get install gddrescue

You'd run it as ddrescue without the underscore as shown in the article.

You can see syntax like this after intalling it:

ddrescue --help

If these two can't copy it, it's probably got something messed up from a component perspective, versus a corruption problem. I've seen ddrescue copy crashed drives that nothing else I tried could copy from physical drive errors.

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 22, 2007, 3:42 PM   #17
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Flasher wrote:
Quote:
Yeah, I mean analyse failed. Sorry, it's a pain, because I keep having to restart my machine to boot into Linux.
Just stay in LInux until you get it fixed. ;-) Knoppix will probably work with your network card from a Live CD. If the installation of new programs works (as shown above), everything else like your browser should, too.

If not (can't access network to install programs or use your browser), we may need to configure it. Did you try Firefox?

What kind of network interface (wired, wireless)? Through a router? DHCP? Any encryption? I can give you a command or two to try and figure out how to get it working if it's not already.

Depending on your version of Knoppix (NTFS-3G support or not), how much ram you have (enough to install programs from the network), it may be easier to just install Linux to your hard disk.

If you're new to Linux, I'd recommend using SimplyMEPIS 6.5.02. It supports most hardware and it has good partitioning tools to resize your NTFS partition and make room for Linux. Then, you could setup a dual boot machine and use Linux or Windows and have easier access to recovery utilities, etc. If you want to try that, say so and I can give you some screen prints on repartitioning your existing drive and making room for it.

It's really very simple to install (great install program that recognizes windows and adds it to the boot menus), and it's already got NTFS-3G preinstalled so you can write recovered image files, etc. to your existing Windows partition. You could use Synaptic (an easy to use software installer with a Graphical User Interface to install anything you wanted to your hard disk, like ddrescue and more), versus trying to squeeze the programs needed into available ram running from a Live CD. It's free.

http://www.mepis.org

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 23, 2007, 10:55 AM   #18
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 12
Default

When I initially run the Analyse I get a read error, after this it seems to iterate through all of the sectors on the card also reporting back read errors, so maybe there is a component error.

I will try and get Knoppix up on th net, but in my experience it's too easy to get side-tracked with Linux when trying to do some of the most simple things. Sorry, I know you're ptobably a big Linux person, but Idon't usually bother messing around, I just use at as a tool for bits and pieces.

Anyway, thanks for all your diligent help so far. I will digest your info now and let you know how I get on.
Flasher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 23, 2007, 11:54 AM   #19
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Actually, I didn't start using Linux more than Windows until fall of last year, and I really don't know a lot about it. I have spent a lot of time over the past couple of years trying different distros (and I usually kept one or more on my hard drive at any given time along with Windows). So, I've picked up a little knowledge here and there. But, some are so easy to install and use anymore, that you really don't need to know much with some.

Distros are getting to be mature enough that it's much easier to install Linux compared to Windows anymore on typical hardware, and I like some of the software available for Linux for image editing.

As for your observations with testdisk, good (testdisk does read through more of the card). It may just be a problem with the first few sectors (or associated flash memory causing it), versus something more serious. Keep your fingers crossed if the images are important.

You may even want to give photorec a try before going to the trouble of creating an image to work from. You will have to navigate to a mounted partition to have a place to save the recovered data to either way, and I don't know if your version of Knoppix can write to NTFS. Do you know what version you have? Do you have an external drive that's formatted FAT32 you can save to?

If you can write to NTFS (and do so at your own risk using an experimental version of any driver you'll find in Knoppix, as I don't think it's stable if it's got one), you'll need to navigate (change directories from a console prompt) to the ntfs partition before running photorec. For example, I'd need to do this with my PC if I wanted to save the images recovered to my ntfs partition (the recovered folder it creates will be on the partition you run it from). Most modern distros will have mount points for your partition under /media or /mnt, and when you navigate to the correct directory, you're on that drive. My XP install is on /media/hda1 in some distros, and /mnt/hda1 in others.

su
cd /media/hda1
photorec

Personally, I'd strongly recommend just installing SimplyMEPIS 6.5.02 to your hard drive. You can use GParted (a partitioning tool included) to resize your existing NTFS partition to make room for it. It pulls up a list of drives it finds and you can select the partition and resize it (leaving free space after it). Then, create a new partition of type ext3 (it's got a drop down list when you select new partition) for SimplyMEPIS. I'd make it around 6GB if you don't want to store much to it. If you don't have much free space, it will install OK in less than 4GB. Then, create a Linux Swap partition (it will be one of the types in the drop down lists). Make the swap about 1GB.

Then, apply the changes (you'll see a commit/apply button) and run the install program (an icon for it is on the desktop when you boot into a SimplyMEPIS Live CD). It only takes about 10 or 15 minutes to install on a fast system. It's one of the easiest installation programs you'll find, and it will automatically add Windows to the boot list (it installs GRUB to your MBR, which is it's default boot manager).

Then, you'll have a full blown Linux distro you can boot into at any time, without the slow speed of a Live CD, or restraints of trying to install programs in RAM (and SimplyMEPIS will require a hard disk installation before it would let you install programs like ddrescue, testdisk, etc.). It's got NTFS write support already enabled by default (most distros don't), uses the Ubuntu Dapper software repositories, and lets you use Synaptic (an easy to use software installation program) to download and install new software from the repositories easily.

It's got simple to use "Assistants" built in like the MEPIS X-Windows Assistant to configure graphics, Network Assistant to configure your Network, System Assistant to reinstall the boot manager in case of problems, and more. It's also got things like browser plugins (for example Adobe Flash 9 Player) already built in. Ditto for accelerated proprietary Graphics drivers (Nvidia, ATI). Many distros don't include that kind of stuff by default (because it's not open source).

My wife has been running MEPIS for around 2 years now (starting with SimplyMEPIS 3.3, then 3.4.x, now 6.0-4 beta 4 on her PC, since I've never bothered upgrading her to the 6.5.02 Final release. Trust me, if she can use it, anyone can. lol It's easier to keep working compared to Windows from my perspective. Sometimes you do have hardware that is not supported well with some distros. But, MEPIS tends to support more hardware compared to many, with easier to use installation and configuration utilities.

It's about a 700MB download if you want to consider it (and it takes about 3GB of disk space when installing). Here is one link to the current version (and I'd suggest using the 32 bit version):

Download Link to SimplyMEPIS 6.5.02

Here's the md5sum so you can make sure you got a good copy:

Download link to md5sum

More download mirrors:

http://www.mepis.org/mirrors

After installing it, you can do this to install testdisk, photorec and dd_rescue (photorec is already in the testdisk package in the Ubuntu repositories).

su
apt-get update
apt-get install testdisk
apt-get install ddrescue

Instead of using apt-get from a console, You can also use Synaptic (the Package Manager menu choice) to install these with a mouse click (just press it's reload button, search for the software, right click on it, and select install).

I tried to convince Warren (the founder of SimplyMEPIS) to include some of these utilities on the Live CD for 6.5 so that it would be easy for people to use it as a recovery CD without installing it. But, they didn't make it (it's tough trying to fit a lot of software into a 700MB CD). lol

A recent review that shows the installation screens:

http://www.tuxmachines.org/node/15040

What Knoppix version do you have now? Can you mount your NTFS partition from it?

I've been spending most of my time in Sidux 2007-2 lately (a distro based on Debian Sid/Unstable), since it gives me access to much newer beta software, etc. But, it doesn't have the preinstalled proprietary drivers, ntfs write support via ntfs-3g preinstalled, etc. So, I'd suggest SimplyMEPIS for a easier to setup and use system for most users.

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 23, 2007, 12:30 PM   #20
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

P.S.

One time good offer (and I may delete this post later to keep from getting more requests).... lol

If you decide it's going to be more trouble than it's worth, send me the card and I'll see what I can do with it (no promises if I can get anything, but I will do my best with the utilities I have available). Just send me a PM and I'll give you a mailing address.

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:34 PM.