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Old Jun 29, 2007, 9:22 PM   #1
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Since Ipurchased myPentax K10D I have spent most of my time on the Pentax specific forums; here, at dpReview, & at Pentax Forums..

I currently have very few images to store/ backup..

Ineed suggestions for several different options, starting at the lower end of the cost spectrum & going up to perhaps $300.00 for my upper limit..

I need the explanations to be pretty simplified so someone from the genus ComputerStupidicusIgnoramuss can understand it!!

I'm currently enrolled in some basic community college non-credit classes to educate myself about computers & digital cameras, although I'm finding it to be slow going..

The software that I will be using is Adobe Photoshop Lightroom along with a SanDisk 12-in-1 USB 2.0 card reader

Lightroom has the ability to make backups as you are importing the images into the software..Is this the method that you think I should adopt??..Or are there other methods of making backup copies that I should consider??..

The main criteria for me is that the methodology be fairly simple & straightforward..

My goal is to compose & take the images that I envision so as to spend as little time as possible inpost processing..

I am not now & I don't see myself becoming extremely computer savvy..

I understand that it is wise to have multiple backups of all images that I treasure , & to keep the copies as current as possible..

I realize that this is going to necessitate more time at archiving the images than I had originally anticipated when I first got started in this hobbyof digital photography..But, so be it..

Finally, are there any books or publications on the whole business of setting up a digital lightroom from start to finish that don't presuppose a degree in computer science??..

Thanks in advance to anyone who can provide help!!

Bruce
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Old Jun 30, 2007, 4:22 AM   #2
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There are several ways to perform backups. I recommendall of them.

First and foremost, you should back up your original images, and the safest way to do that is onto CD-Rs and DVD-/+Rs, and preferably onto multiple brands of disks. They won't last forever, but they can't be erased and the devices to read them will be with us for the foreseeable future.

The methods used by applications back up your images onto magnetic media, and that's probably the least reliable storage medium. And while backing up onto an external hard disk drivemay seem like a good idea, external hard disk drives are probably more likely to fail than any other storage medium you have or have access to.

Another way to back up your photos is to upload them to a service like Flickr.com or SmugMug.com.

There are two reasons to back up: 1. to recover from a catastrophic failure, and 2. to recover from a stupid mistake. Backing up onto non-erasable optical media (CD-R, DVD-R, DVD+R) works for both. Backing up to an on-line service works for both. Backing up to a hard disk drive, while more convenient,only works for the second.
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Old Jun 30, 2007, 7:58 AM   #3
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Copy onto ARCHIVAL grade CD-Rs

eg: http://mam-a.com/products/gold/archive.html

.......uses robust GoId-on-GoldĀ® construction to provide the maximum resistance to environmental degradation. Long-term applications such as backfile conversion, e-mail archiving, and storage of classified correspondence can benefit from the Archive CD-R's strict quality control and patented Phthalocyanine dye (tha-lo-cy-a-neen) formula, which offers storage life well in excess of 100 years. There is not a more stable, more reliable media for long term storage available today. Only paper lasts longer.

also see: http://mam-a.com/technology/technica.../cdr_dyes.html

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Old Jun 30, 2007, 8:43 AM   #4
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I reiterate: use multiple backup methods and multiple brands of media. Don't put all your eggs in one basket, no matter how good that one basket might seem.
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Old Jun 30, 2007, 9:24 AM   #5
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I'm with Tcav, having recently gone through failure hell.
In one week in May:
Several CD's (the expensive archival ones) failed one after another.
Some DVD's (media is not archival at all) became unreadable.
Internal HD failed in PC, and a 2 GB Sandisk card died.

I have multiple backups in different locations so was able to recover most things except the CF card.

Yes I do have an external raided NAS, very nice but in the past I have had a raid controller card fail and trash the array.

No one method is safe, if it is magnetic it will eventually fail, if it spins it will eventually fail, if it relies on heat modified dyes it will eventually fail, if it is solid state it will eventually fail.

This is really nothing new or unique to digital, in the old world of film the film (negative or reversal) would eventually fade and depending on storage conditions could fade quite quickly.
And if the storage was dark and humid there was a fungus that really liked to eat the media.

Myself I am starting to investigate hiring on to an archive service like http://www.photoshelter.com/ (expensive) or maybe http://marketplace.digitalrailroad.net/ (don't know much about them yet) and let them worry about maintaining your image archives.

There is a fairly good book on digital asset management called "The DAM book" http://www.thedambook.com/

Let us know what you come up with.


Peter.

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Old Jun 30, 2007, 7:51 PM   #6
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One more person plugging multiple backup modes, but my second one (after CDs) hasn't been discussed here.

You can get a gizmo on e-bay, for a fairly reasonable price (seems to me like I spent around $60) that basically consists of a housing for a laptop hardrive with a battery, slots for the various memory cards, and a USB port. If you put in a hard drive of, say, 60 gig, you can partition the drive (via the USB connection) into a photobank of 30 gig or smaller that will receive your pictures from your camera or card while you are traveling, and the remainder will be formatted as a Windows drive. The way I use the extra 30 gig is to periodically copy my entire photo library to the drive.

Hard drives are pretty cheap these days (even cheaper if you have a dead laptop laying around, like I did), and you wind up with a very useful device that can bothbackup your library and free up your memory card on a long or active trip.

I would add one more thing to this discussion: Since we know that CDs don't really last forever, and they cost less than a buck apiece these days, what in the heck is wrong with maybe once a year backing up from scratch (instead of the incremental backups available with most photo library software) and ditching the old discs? I do that, and it has the added benefit of cutting down on the number of stored discs. Yeah, it takes a while, but there isbound to be a rainy day sooner or later,andthe price isn't very big compared to losing everything you have shot.
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Old Jun 30, 2007, 10:15 PM   #7
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docmoon wrote:
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One more person plugging multiple backup modes, but my second one (after CDs) hasn't been discussed here.

You can get a gizmo on e-bay, for a fairly reasonable price (seems to me like I spent around $60) that basically consists of a housing for a laptop hardrive with a battery, slots for the various memory cards, and a USB port.
What you're discussing is an external hard disk drive. This is the least reliable medium for backing up. In addition to all of the things that can fail in a hard disk drive, all of the things in the "gizmo" can fail too. If you want to use a hard disk drive as a backup medium, put it in one of the unused drive baysin your computer. It will be a lot more reliable that your "gizmo".

docmoon wrote:
Quote:
I would add one more thing to this discussion: Since we know that CDs don't really last forever, and they cost less than a buck apiece these days, what in the heck is wrong with maybe once a year backing up from scratch (instead of the incremental backups available with most photo library software) and ditching the old discs?
The practice I suggestis to back up all new photos as youmove them from your camera. That way, you'll always have the originals. You can play with them to your heart's content, and if you happen to screwup andsave something you didn't mean to save, or you delete something you didn't mean to delete, you can get the original image off theoriginal backup. That's not an incremental backup, that's a full backup of a single directory.

If you do a full backup of all your photos every so often,and throw away the disks from the last full backup, you might lose the originals. You can recreate the images you may have created from your originals, but you can't recreate the originals.

What you're doing may be convenient, but it's not a good backup strategy.
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Old Jul 1, 2007, 1:41 PM   #8
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For me a major problem with CD's is they only hold about 500mb each.

For a camera like the Canon EOS 1Ds Mark II the RAW files average around 13-16 MB and they open to about 95MB 16-bit .psd files.

My personal image library has grown to over a terabyte now.
Makes using CD for multiple copies a bit rough :-)

A Buffalo terastation is good for interm storage but not longterm, like all harddrives arrays it will eventually fail.

I guess this is one of the big "Oh Drat, I did not see this issue comming" moments of the digital reveloution :G
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Old Jul 1, 2007, 2:05 PM   #9
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PeterP wrote:
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A Buffalo terastation is good for interm storage but not longterm, like all harddrives arrays it will eventually fail.
Actually, with a RAID system, you can survive one hard disk drive failure, and as long as you replace the failed drive before another drive fails, you're safe.

But it won't protect you against stupid mistakes. That's why you should backup your original photos to off-line or near-line media, like tapes, CD-Rs (Yeah. I know.), DVD-Rs or DVD+Rs.

And Dual Layer DVDs can store over 9 GB. That should handle plenty of RAW files.
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Old Jul 2, 2007, 11:22 AM   #10
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PeterP wrote:
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For me a major problem with CD's is they only hold about 500mb each.
Last I looked the CD-R capacity was 700MB. CD-RWs formated as read-write are about 550MB.
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