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Old Jun 16, 2010, 9:03 PM   #1
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Default Does speed really matter on memory cards?

Hi everyone,

I am new to the forum and I am very much interested in photography and would like to take more great pictures to keep memories of my family and to hang it up on the wall at my house. (With my signature on the bottom, of course)

Anyways, my question is, does speed of the SDHC card really matter on my Nikon D5000? Or as a matter effect, on ANY dSLR?
I have been looking at the 16 GB SanDisk Ultra II Flash Memory Card 15mb/s vs. 8 GB SanDisk Extreme 30mb/s

Does it really make a difference from a normal SD card?

Will this increase my memory buffer in multi-shooting mode? Right now I can only get 5 continuous shots which is really pain when I'm trying to take some action shots.

Any advice will help. Thank you in advanced!
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Old Jun 16, 2010, 9:16 PM   #2
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The speed of the flash memory card can affect certain things, but not others.

If you'll be recording video, a slow memory card will cause the camera's buffer to fill as it transfers data to the card, causing gaps in the video. If you've set your camera to record images as RAW (NEF) or RAW+JPEG, then you may experience shutter lag when taking subsequent shots. If you'll use Continuous Mode to record sequences of images, the time between shots will increase greatly when the buffer gets full.
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Old Jun 16, 2010, 11:46 PM   #3
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Quote:
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The speed of the flash memory card can affect certain things, but not others.

If you'll be recording video, a slow memory card will cause the camera's buffer to fill as it transfers data to the card, causing gaps in the video. If you've set your camera to record images as RAW (NEF) or RAW+JPEG, then you may experience shutter lag when taking subsequent shots. If you'll use Continuous Mode to record sequences of images, the time between shots will increase greatly when the buffer gets full.
Thank you for the reply.

I won't be recording too much video since Nikon D5000 does not have auto focus when it's in Video mode and it only records 5 mins at 720p... bummer..

I usually use jpeg when I'm shooting pics. Should I be using RAW+JPEG to capture better images?

How can I increase the buffer on my Nikon D5000? At the moment, I can only shoot 5 at a time then it slows down. I had it to 19 once but I don't remember how I changed it. Any ideas?
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Old Jun 16, 2010, 11:58 PM   #4
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RAW will require you to do most post production editing to get more out of your photos. So if you are not big on photo editing, and want to shoot raw. Start brushing up on how to edit with the program you use.

Raw and jpeg really slows down the camera. If you are only getting 5 shots before buffer lag. in raw and jpeg you may on get 2 and in raw maybe 3. But that sound like you have a slow card. I think you should be able to run off at least 10 photos before buffer lag.

You can not increase the buffer in the camera.

What class card do you currently use?
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Old Jun 17, 2010, 4:54 AM   #5
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I guess my thought is that any memory cards I buy will be used for a few years to come. So, whilst not a large investment, I might as well get something that will work. And since class 10 costs very near to what class 6 or even lower costs, why not get class 10? That's my reasoning anyway.
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Old Jun 17, 2010, 6:23 AM   #6
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When you shoot JPEG, you have the option to touch up any minor problems with the shot in post processing. When you shoot RAW, you must do post processing for every shot, but it lets you recover from some major problems. But the files are big, so it slows things down, and you can't take as many shots before your card fills up.

It sounds like you're already bumping into one of the limitations of using slower cards. Since you can't increase the size of the buffer in the camera, the only solution is to use faster cards.
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Old Jun 17, 2010, 8:54 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MyNikonD5000 View Post
Will this increase my memory buffer in multi-shooting mode? Right now I can only get 5 continuous shots which is really pain when I'm trying to take some action shots.
Are you sure you don't have the camera set to RAW+JPEG

That's about right (5 photos before the camera slows down) shooting RAW+JPEG with a fast card in a D5000.

If you're shooting JPEG Fine, you should be able to take lots of photos before a slowdown with a fast card (100 with a 30MB/Second Extreme III; or around 20 with a some slower Class 6 cards).

What kind of card do you have now?

If it's already set to JPEG only (versus RAW + JPEG), try turning Active D-Lighting off and see what you get. Active D-Lighting slows down some Nikon models significantly if it's enabled.
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