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Old Mar 8, 2014, 2:39 PM   #1
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Default see photo, which card is 'fastest'?

I received my mom's camera along with several memory cards. what's the difference between them (besides the obvious of how 'much' data they can hold?). Is one 'faster' than the others? Camera is a four year old Canon Powershot A3100 IS.

Thanks!
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Old Mar 8, 2014, 2:51 PM   #2
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First, the SanDisk Ultra II is a Class 4 card, which means that, under ideal circumstances, the card can be written to at a minimum of 4 MB/sec. The PNY and Canon cards may have "Class" markings, but they aren't legible in the image you posted.

Second, from tests I've performed, I've concluded that smaller cards are faster than larger cards. So if they are all Class 4 cards, and the SanDisk card is 2GB, the PNY is 8GB and the Canon is 32GB (which isn't clear; the "32" is, but the "GB" isn't) I'd say that the SanDisk is fastest.
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Old Mar 8, 2014, 8:20 PM   #3
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Look closely at the Canon card. I think that's an old 32 MB card. Very tiny and slow. If it is 32MB, it's basically useless in the newer camera.

Look closely at the 8GB PNY and see if there isn't a 4 or a 6 numeral in the little circle. It's very likely that the 8GB will be at least a class 4 and possibly a class 6. If there is no numeral at all, then it's a class 2, and wasn't really intended for use in a camera.
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Old Mar 9, 2014, 9:15 AM   #4
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Thanks Steve for this info, looks like interesting data on the front of these tiny things, glad you could interpret.
Second question, if I may?
two photos from this morning
1. darker one is from the Powershot (#2255)
2. lighter one (better, I think) is from a Rebel EOS (DS 6041) (#2539).

do you have suggestions on how to make Powershot photos 'lighter'?

thanks again - C
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Old Mar 9, 2014, 9:17 AM   #5
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yes, I see a 4 inside of a capital C on both the 8mb PNY and the 2mb SanDisk.
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Old Mar 9, 2014, 1:39 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catherine View Post
yes, I see a 4 inside of a capital C on both the 8mb PNY and the 2mb SanDisk.
The smaller of the two will still be very slightly faster, but the difference probably isn't significant for what you're doing.
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Old Mar 9, 2014, 1:51 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catherine View Post
... do you have suggestions on how to make Powershot photos 'lighter'?
You could probably set an exposure compensation value, but you should know that what you're seeing is going to happen, sometimes in the other direction, despite your best efforts. Minor variations in the composition, minor variations in the exposure system, and just random chance, will cause two images to vary slightly in brightness, sometimes even from the same camera. Exposure systems choose settings that are within 1/3 Ev (or stop) of perfect simply because that's what cameras do. The shutter speed is always within 1/3 stop (i.e.: 1/125, 1/100, 1/80, 1/60, ...), the aperture is always within 1/3 stop (i.e.: f/4.0, f/4.5, f/5.0, f/5.6, ...), and the ISO is always within 1/3 stop (i.e.: 100, 125, 160, 200, ...). As a result, there will almost always be minor variations in the relative brightness of similar images.
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Old Mar 9, 2014, 4:59 PM   #8
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BTW, your inquiries have ventured beyond the title of this topic. This means that others that may be better able to respond don't know what you're asking about. You should start new topics in appropriate forums for any further questions you might have.
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Old Mar 9, 2014, 6:06 PM   #9
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The EXIF (containing info on your camera settings) was stripped out of those photos by the forums software, because they exceeded the maximum size allowed here. See this post discussing that issue:

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/ge...ml#post1368647

Without knowing what metering mode you were using, or if you might have accidentally set Exposure Compensation to a -EV value, it's hard to say why they're too dark.

But, you may want to try resetting your camera back to factory defaults for starters. You'll see a "Reset All" Choice under your Setup menus. See the playback menu choices at the bottom of this review page:

http://www.steves-digicams.com/camer...photos-50.html

Even though there is a lot of sky in that scene, which can lead to underexposure in some cases, it's still dark enough to make me think it's something you're doing wrong (for example, trying to use spot metering on a white portion of the sky versus leaving metering set to defaults; or using a minus EV setting with Exposure Compensation, which would also cause an underexposed image; or doing something like trying to use Manual Exposure with an shutter speed that's too fast for the aperture being used). Any of those types of settings errors could cause underexposed images.

So, I'd reset it to defaults for starters and see if that solves your problem, especially if you're seeing consistently underexposed (too dark) images with other scene types, too; as I would not expect the default Auto Exposure to underexpose an image that much (leading me to believe you've probably got something set incorrectly leading to underexposed images).

Does it do the same thing when on the "Green" Auto mode (or were you using a different mode for that image)?

I'd reset it back to defaults for starters and see if it works OK in Green Auto mode. Then make sure you understand what the available settings are for when using other modes (for example dialing in + or - Exposure Compensation, use of different metering modes, etc.).
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Old Mar 9, 2015, 6:27 AM   #10
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i ll tell from the first image from the leftside
1. SDHC Memory Card 32GB
2. SDHC Memory Card 8GB
3. 2GB SD Memory Card
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