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Old Nov 19, 2002, 9:59 AM   #1
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Default So, WHAT makes a card "go bad"?

Is there something one can do to lessen the chances of a card going bad? According to my troubleshooting section of the camera's instructions, the error code I'm getting means the card is useless.

I think I just found a HUGE drawback to digital photography
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Old Nov 19, 2002, 10:14 AM   #2
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Handling can make the card go bad. If you put your fingers on the metal part of the card it can destroy the card. If you have access to another camera, does not need to be the same model, see if you can format the card in the other camera. Magnetic fields can also destroy the card. Static electricy is another enemy of the card.
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Old Nov 19, 2002, 2:38 PM   #3
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I'd go further and say handling accounts for something like 95+% of memory failures. Bent pins, static, bad formating, hot coffee, .... just don't happen if the card stays in the camera, and become very rare with careful handling.

NickG100's comments about his problems(http://www.stevesforums.com/phpBB2/v...ghlight=#19033) contained the tell-tale phrase, "... when I put the card in the reader ....".

Though I hadn't heard how "Magnetic fields can also destroy the card" unless they are large enough to phyically damage something.
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Old Nov 19, 2002, 2:52 PM   #4
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Hmmmm.. veddy intahresteeng...

Sounds like I should just buy the AC adaptor and use the camera instead of the card reader.

The only reason that I got the card reader was becasue I heard it was faster than the camera when transferring images.
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Old Nov 19, 2002, 2:52 PM   #5
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I have the tendency to believe that CF cards are much more robust than we think. But a writing fault can make it inaccessible ( poping it out when it is still writing for example.)
We heard also about forgotten CF cards that go through washers and dryers.
About static discharge: my experience let me conclude that they are extremely resistant to. Often ,I plug and unplug CF cards and readers in office, and very often got static discharge directly to cards and readers, without any damage(up to date).
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Old Nov 19, 2002, 3:02 PM   #6
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Flash has limited erase/write cycles as well...

When a memory location is written, a whole block needs to be erased first and rewritten even if only one location need to be changed. Theses cycles are usually rated pretty high, but just remember that when a picture in a block is deleted, other pictures in the same block of flash are also affected.
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Old Nov 20, 2002, 9:30 AM   #7
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Data (photos) are written to your media card via magnetic fields. Card that comes in contact with a magnetic field will rearrange the data and could damage the card. Please refer to the following web site: http://www.dcviews.com/tutors.htm
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Old Nov 20, 2002, 12:04 PM   #8
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Default What is Flash?

http://www.samsungelectronics.com/se...t_is_flash.htm
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Old Nov 20, 2002, 1:14 PM   #9
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Thanks NHL, as I read http://www.samsungelectronics.com/se...t_is_flash.htm, it shows that flash memory is an electronic device, not magnetic. There is no reference to magnetic fields on that page.

At http://www.samsungelectronics.com/se...10229_100.html they say, "The new flash memory card, known as a Solid-State Floppy-Disk Card (SSFDC), combines small size with simple structure. Unlike conventional memory devices like floppy disks, SSFDC is not magnetic."
at http://www.samsungelectronics.com/se...13859_104.html- "The NAND driver, a USB interfaced flash card, which features high shock resistance, is a unique solution over conventional magnetic storage medium for industrial applications such as military equipment and a future substitute for solid state disks"

There might be magnetic flash memory in a few years, but I don't think it has left the research labs yet.
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Old Nov 20, 2002, 1:28 PM   #10
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Thanks Bill and NHL for the information. It is amazing the things we can learn.
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