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Old Feb 17, 2007, 11:36 AM   #1
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Hi,

I would like to buy a 72mm circular multi-coated polarizer for my 18-200mm Nikon lens.

My local camera stores carries a brand called Promaster, which they claim is "pretty much" the same as Hoya. I am usually suspicious of such statements as "pretty much" like this or like that....

Does anyone know the difference between the two?

I saw the 72mm Pro1 multi-coated Hoya polarizer on ebay (repulateable place by multiple sources usually suggested in these fora) for $90. The very same thing by the same company is sold for $120, but with "Double thread" as opposed to the $90 "Single thread." What does this mean, and is it worth paying $30 more for "Double thread"?

Finally, I can get a generic brand (still multi-coated) for a lot less. Is there a real difference in quality by going to well known brands? BTW, price is not necessarily an issue for me, but if I can save, sure why not...
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Old Feb 17, 2007, 12:42 PM   #2
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I wouldn't pay and extra $30 for the double thread. I am assuming that lets you stack another filter on top and you don't generally do that with digital. You might want to stack a graduated ND filter, but you would probably require a tripod in many situations if you did that. Bracketing the shot and merging the images is probably a preferred method.

Some people stack two polarizers and rotate them for variable ND. Or stack a regular ND to get a slow shutter in bright situations. It might be nice to have that versatility, but you could get the ND with a dual thread – most come with that. And you usually want the polarizer on top anyway. For the multiple polarizer you could put a cheaper linear on top, but not many people use multiple polarizers as ND.

Generic can be a crap shoot. The generic might be made by Hoya and rebranded. Or it could be good quality from an independent manufacturer. Or it could have lower grade glass and less than great lens coating. From everything I've read Promaster is decent quality and I doubt you would see the difference. The only way to be sure is to by a quality brand though.

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Old Feb 17, 2007, 4:41 PM   #3
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HOYA OH YA
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Old Feb 17, 2007, 6:06 PM   #4
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thanks guys for replies.

upon reading more about multi-coated filters in general, i've gotten the impression that cleaning them is not an easy task, and as such a dirty quality filter might be worse than a cheap clean filter....anyway, the B+W which I read is another excellent brand does not have multi-coating? Is this important to what the polarizer is supposed to do?

any thoughts on Nikon filters? I've seen some decently priced on Adorma and BHphoto
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Old Mar 1, 2007, 3:07 PM   #5
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Photino,

Promaster is made by Hoya. Hoya has another line of filters known as 'digital' filters (these cost nearly twice as much). These filters have multiple coatings that, in addition to providing scratch resistance, are supposed to reduce sensor flare. The idea is you can use these on non DX/DI/EFs/DA lenses without the ill-effects of sensor flare.

The downside to Digital filters is that they are nearly twice as expensive as a normal filter.



-An-D

www.porters.com
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Old Apr 3, 2007, 11:18 PM   #6
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If you can afford it, buy the Nikon polarizer for superior color neutrality. I've owned Hoya, Pentax, Canon and Nikon polarizers and all had greenish tints, with Nikon being the most neutral. Try comparing polarizers viewed against white paper at a camera store and you will see a range of green tints.
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Old Apr 3, 2007, 11:20 PM   #7
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Sorry, double posted by accident.
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Old Apr 4, 2007, 12:13 PM   #8
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photino wrote:
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thanks guys for replies.

upon reading more about multi-coated filters in general, i've gotten the impression that cleaning them is not an easy task, and as such a dirty quality filter might be worse than a cheap clean filter....anyway, the B+W which I read is another excellent brand does not have multi-coating? Is this important to what the polarizer is supposed to do?

any thoughts on Nikon filters? I've seen some decently priced on Adorma and BHphoto
I've never noticed that cleaning multi-coated lenses or filters was any different than single coated lens/filter. Multi-coated lens/filters should be more durable since the outer coating is an anti-scratch coating. Multi-coating will also, all other things equal, have a little less transmission loss and a little higher contrast. This is a relatively small effect in a filter because we're only dealing with two air/glass interfaces in a normal filter.

I probably would spring for multi-coating if I werebuying a new filter. Buying used I might buy single-coating if the price was low enough and the filter was a reputable brand.
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