Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Misc Accessories

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 21, 2009, 12:57 PM   #1
conor
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Filter questions

What filters do you have in your bag?
Do you have all filters for all focal lengths? or have you chosen to buy only certain filters for certain uses?

I understand the value of having a quality UV filter for outdoor lenses, but what about a polarizer? Could someone give me an example of when you'd most likely see a big gain with one?

I have a camera that is only capable of speeds down to ISO200. I'd like to be able to shoot with longer shutter times in well lit environments (I would like to shoot at ISO50). Are there any filters that will darken the frame? If so, how many stops could I gain (or lose, depending how you look at it) before I started seeing degradation of the outputted image?

Lastly, what filters are used in portrait photography and why? I've often seen studio photographers dropping in gel filters during shoots, but I have no idea what they are or why they're using them.

Thanks!

Last edited by conor; May 21, 2009 at 1:00 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old May 21, 2009, 2:37 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
tjsnaps's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Sacramento, Ca
Posts: 652
Default

I have never been big on filters but with film you had to use them.
Today with digital most of those effects cam be done in Photoshop etc.
But some filters do still come in handy.

A polarizer is a must, it will darken sky’s and enhance colors. As well as its main purpose, reducing reflections.

Neutral Density filters will cut down the amount of light coming through the lens without effecting color, allowing longer exposure times. They come in different strengths and can be stacked.

Graduated Neutral Density filters will do the same thing but only on the top or bottom portion of the picture.

And lastly I have not found a Photoshop plugin that simulates a crosstar filter. (turning pin point light sources into stars) I use a piece of window screening in a cokin filter holder.

Portrait photographers will often use a diffusion filter to soften wrinkles etc. But IMO it’s better to do this in Photoshop after the shoot.

Most of my lenses have a 52mm filter thread so one filter will fit them. If you have two lenses close in size you can use a step up adapter on the smaller one. Square filters such as those made by cokin fit into a holder that can be fit on a variety of lens sizes. This is the best way to go for Graduated filters as the filters can be moved up and down in the holder.
tjsnaps is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 21, 2009, 5:25 PM   #3
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by conor View Post
I understand the value of having a quality UV filter for outdoor lenses....
\

You may find this thread to be of interest (it includes a link to tests of a number of popular UV filters):

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/pe...lter-test.html
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 21, 2009, 8:51 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Decatur, GA
Posts: 2,053
Default

I have a UV filter/Protector on my main lens and I also have a CP (Circular Polarizer) that I use when I shoot on or into bodies of water.

dave
Photo 5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 1, 2009, 6:23 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
superakuma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 550
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by conor View Post
What filters do you have in your bag?
Do you have all filters for all focal lengths? or have you chosen to buy only certain filters for certain uses?

I understand the value of having a quality UV filter for outdoor lenses, but what about a polarizer? Could someone give me an example of when you'd most likely see a big gain with one?

I have a camera that is only capable of speeds down to ISO200. I'd like to be able to shoot with longer shutter times in well lit environments (I would like to shoot at ISO50). Are there any filters that will darken the frame? If so, how many stops could I gain (or lose, depending how you look at it) before I started seeing degradation of the outputted image?

Lastly, what filters are used in portrait photography and why? I've often seen studio photographers dropping in gel filters during shoots, but I have no idea what they are or why they're using them.

Thanks!
If you want to use longer shutter speed then you want a ND filter, aka Neutral Density filter.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutral_density_filter
Pick your favorite brand, they all make them. They have different density that you can pick from.

As far as filters goes, I usually use a UV/clear filter on my lens when I shoot outdoors mainly as a lens protector. The only other filters that I use is a circular polorizer filter. I have two of these for two different lens, the Sigma 10-20mm and the Sigma 18-50mm. They are my "landscape" lens and they work wonders when taking pictures outdoors.
__________________
http://saelee.smugmug.com/
superakuma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 1, 2009, 8:03 PM   #6
conor
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks everyone for the great feedback, much appreciated!

Ok, so I shelled out the money for Hoya HMC Super UV(0) filters for both my better lenses (67mm for my 28-70 and 77mm for my 70-200). I've yet to test them outdoors.

Next on my list will be a 67mm neutral density filter, and possibly a 67mm circular polarizer but they'll definitely have to wait as my camera budget is definitely shot for the next few months!!
  Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:51 AM.