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Old Jan 5, 2005, 3:12 AM   #1
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I hear that polarizerslike Hoya Tiffen and Cokin are all good polarizers how about Omega? Also Ipurchased a circular polarizer for my first filter. I was curious of why the front part of the metal circle rotates while attached to my lens.

Also what do close-up filters do, and when would you want one?
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Old Jan 5, 2005, 3:29 AM   #2
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Ok I found out that the top ring of the polarizer rotates to change the effect of the change. The article I read said 'to see the effect of rotating the filter look at the LCD panel'.

Is it possible to see the effect in the viewfinder.
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Old Jan 5, 2005, 6:45 AM   #3
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Hi CaliBoy,

A circular polarizer works just a pair of polarized sunglasses. It cuts the glare.

It is circular so you can choose the amount of polarization you want.

It you set your camera so you can see your shutter speed, you will see the shutter speed slow down a bit (example 1/125 to 1/100 or 1/80) as you reach maximum polarization.

It isa great filter for when you are trying to shoot with sun in your lens (not the usual choice for sun placement). Also, it will enhance the blues of a blue sky.

Closeup lens magnify items. If you browse the forum here in the Closeup threads you will see some great examples. Typically, closeupslens are +1, +3 and +4.

Circular polarizers will work with thebright,sunny days you will see eventually in Minnesota afterthe bigstorm is over! :-)
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Old Jan 5, 2005, 9:08 AM   #4
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You can't usually see enough in the LCD to make polarizing decisions. The good news is that polarized light both from the sky and reflections are seldom far from horizontal. If your polarizer has a mark you usually put that vertically. If it doesn't have a mark make one.

Polarized sunglasses are always polarized so they block horizontally polarized light. Go to Wal-Mart and set a pair of their polarized glasses on something so they are level and horizontal (like you wear them). Hold your polarizer in front of them and rotate it until the view is completely dark. Mess around going back and forth until you are pretty much centered on the dark point. Make horizontal marks on the polarizer. These should be vertical when you shoot.

You can take the polarizer from the camera and hold it close in front of your eye and rotate it. When you get maximum contrast or reflection removal look at your mark and put it in the same place after you replace it on the camera. Another way is to wear polarized sunglasses. Tilt your head slightly each way to see if it improves the image and match your mark to that angle.

I have found you can't go far wrong just putting the mark straight up.

If you have only a LCD for a through the lens viewfinder you are wasting your money on a circular polarizer. A linear polarizer works every bit as well unless you have a SLR or DSLR. If you plan to buy a DSLR someday and the filter might fit, a circular would make sense. The only Omega filters I am familiar with went on my old Omega enlarger. It is a good company if the filters you are referring to are from the same company that makes the enlargers. You can't usually go wrong with Tiffen or Cokin.

Most digital cameras focus pretty close. You would want a closeup filter if you wanted to get even closer. A closeup filter might also help if your lens blocks the flash when you get close by allowing a closer focus zoomed out – I would think that would vary with the camera.

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Old Jan 5, 2005, 2:30 PM   #5
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Thanks for your replys. What should I mark the polarizer with?
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Old Jan 6, 2005, 6:17 PM   #6
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digcamfan wrote:
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It isa great filter for when you are trying to shoot with sun in your lens (not the usual choice for sun placement). Also, it will enhance the blues of a blue sky.
Not sure I understand your point here. Polarizing filters are LEAST effective if the light source is coming from directly in front of you or from directly behind you. They are MOST effective if the light is coming perpendicular to the lens. That is to say that if the light source is at 90 degrees or 270 degrees, you get maximum effect and you get minimum effect if the light is at 0 degrees or at 180 degrees.

So if the light is coming in from, say 30 degrees, then the effect would be less than it would be at 90 degrees, but more than at 0 degrees.

Also - keep in mind that polarizers only cuts glare from NON metallic surfaces. It works quite well with reflections from glass, wet shiny leaves, bodies of water etc, but will do nothing to kill the reflected glare from the hood of a shiny car say.

And...you do not need the sun to be shining to gain the benefit of this incredibly useful tool. I most often use my polarizer on rainy, dreary days to kill the reflections of rain or dew on flowers. Try a before and after photo of a flower wet with rain or dew and watch how the colors POP when you polarize out the "glare" from the wet petals.

If you decide to use your polarizer to deepen the color of a bright sunny sky, keep a few things in mind. First, do not automatically crank the filter to maximum effect and turn the sky dark, dark almost blackish blue. The color is unatural, and while the effect can be dramatic on occasion, the image will scream "polarizer" and if you shoot all of your shots like that, the effect gets very old very fast. Second, if you are using the filter on a wide angle lens, you may find that the polarization effect is not even across the entire image. This is more often a problem with lenses that are wider than 28mm (in 35mm terms) and if you are using a point and shoot it will be less of a problem since most P&S's are less wide than that. If you do get any uneven polarization due to wide angle lens use, understand that it has nothing to do with the quality of the filter; it is a law of physics and it matters not which polarizer you use. If you get the uneven effect, you will find it to be very distracting.

All in all, the polarizer is most often described as the one indispensible filter.

Hope this helps.










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Old Jan 10, 2005, 4:48 PM   #7
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To mark your polarizer, you could use a dab of permanent correcting fluid available in any office suppy store on the outer, ridged rim of the filter.

Just a small amount is necessary.
:-)

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Old Mar 3, 2005, 5:56 PM   #8
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CaliBoy wrote:
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Ok I found out that the top ring of the polarizer rotates to change the effect of the change. The article I read said 'to see the effect of rotating the filter look at the LCD panel'.

Is it possible to see the effect in the viewfinder.
I find the effects do indeed show up quite nicely on my LCD display. That's how I adjust it for minimum reflections. I use a linear polarizer but I'd think a circular one would do the same thing. My camera is a Minolta Z1.


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