Steve's Digicams Forums

Steve's Digicams Forums (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/)
-   Newbie Help (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/newbie-help-16/)
-   -   Huge Dilemma, need help... (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/newbie-help-16/huge-dilemma-need-help-12589/)

Hammerjoe Aug 11, 2003 6:32 AM

Huge Dilemma, need help...
 
Hi,

I'm a newbie regarding Digital photography.

My dilemma is very simple.

Why should I fork so much money for a Digital camera??

I have my eyes set on a c-740.
I think it is a great camera, but the more I think about buying it more I think why I want to buy it.


I have to make a decision, and one day is yes I want one so I can take beautiful pictures of pretty much everything, and some days no, it's too expensive just for some lousy pictures.


So what were your arguments that made you decide to get a Digital camera?

Help me take the plunge. :?

voxmagna Aug 11, 2003 6:56 AM

Think about what you want to do. If it's holidays twice a year shooting 2-3 rolls of film, then stick with film, get images scanned to CD if you like.

If you are interested in opportunities to take more pictures, willing to spend the time, likely to enjoy 'digital darkroom' work and take pride in producing your own 'unique' work, start thinking digital.

It's not about which camera, more about the experience of photography. If you aren't sure on this point, consider buying a cheaper re-furb or new digicam 2-3Mpix, get some experience and see whether digital is for you.

digcamfan Aug 11, 2003 9:54 AM

Hi Hammerjoe...

Take the plunge :).

No debate.

It is too much fun to wait! :D

Make sure you buy your digcam with at least a 15 day
return policy.

That way, if, you choose to stick to film, you can
possibly return the cam.

Good luck :)

Alan T Aug 11, 2003 11:02 AM

Re: Huge Dilemma, need help...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Hammerjoe
So what were your arguments that made you decide to get a Digital camera?

1. Being able to take and retake shots as much as I like without worrying about running costs. The key to successful photography for everyone except the famous guys who always got it right first time is to take many times as many shots as needed, and throw most of them away. With a digicam you get to see the result immediately, like a Polaroid, so you can throw lots of the rubbish away immediately. Also you learn as you go along - when in doubt, try it out. With film, you've forgotten what you did by the time you see the results, unless you're a rare obsessive record keeper, bringing me on to...

2. The digicam is likely to record exactly what you (or it) did for each shot in its 'exif' data, so you can analyse the results at leisure later with an exif reader.

3. Getting away from DUST. I have always lived in old, dusty houses, and being a little bit decrepit, lots of bits of me fall off and land on negatives, slides, etc., to be inspected hugely magnified later by all & sundry, or entailing hours of work 'spotting' (latterly digitally on filmscanned negatives).

4. With the advent of 5Mpixel fully-featured digicams at a price I can afford, digicams the size of my compact carry-anywhere 35mm camera have actually caught up very nearly with the quality I got from my big, heavy SLR & lenses, with enormously less associated hassle.

Will that do for a start?

steve6 Aug 11, 2003 1:21 PM

Quote:

except the famous guys who always got it right first time is to take many times as many shots as needed,
Alan, so do the famous guys, they can afford the film though. Any good photographer would take several shots e.g. bracketing.

Alan T Aug 11, 2003 3:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by steve6
Quote:

except the famous guys who always got it right first
so do the famous guys, they can afford the film though.

I'm thinking of someone in particular (maybe it was Henri Cartier-Bresson???), whose candid shots wouldn't have hung around long enough for bracketing, and who always printed exactly what was on his neg without twiddling.

neutron Aug 11, 2003 3:28 PM

I fully endorse the previous replies but the two most appealing attributes of the digital image for me are ease of manipulation and ready access for family viewing on TV when stored on CD.
My biggest problem is deciding which camera to purchase.
Good luck

gibsonpd3620 Aug 11, 2003 4:20 PM

I went from 35mm to digital and these are my benefits from the transition:

1. I rarely had film around for the camera except for special occasions.
2. If I had film and shot one of those special moments it may take a month or more to fill up the roll. I often forgot what was on the roll until it was developed.
3. I would shoot and about 50% of the shots were what I would call keepers.
4. I can shoot one photo from the digital and print or delete it at any time.
5. I shoot pics all the time because it just handy.
6. Editing, developing, and printing you own photos is fun.

Phil

Wildman Aug 11, 2003 8:54 PM

I agree with Gibson... he hinted at it, but the "instant gratification factor" is also important. Folks love to see a print quickly. Last summer I shot pix of the kids at Vacation Bible School at 10:30 and delivered prints by noon.

Digital cameras give you a whole new perspective. Shoot, shoot, shoot. Throw out the crappy ones (probably 75% in my case) and save the pretty good ones... print maybe 10% of the survivors after you've tweaked them. I love to make a picture look better than the original scene by fixing a blah sky or blurring a background that didn't look right when I took the picture.

ardvark50 Aug 12, 2003 1:51 AM

Here's a big reason for you, if a memory card ever breaks or gets messed up somehow, you can sometimes retrieve the pictures on it with the right software. A while back I had a roll of film with all sorts of pictures on it, including several shots of a lunar eclipse, in my camera. I went to remove the film from the camera and for some reason, it wouldn't rewind. Instead, the end of the film got ripped from the cartridge so I couldn't rewind it or remove the film without exposing it and ruining all of my shots. That, and, of course, the instant gratification factor are reasons why I like digital (not to mention the fact that getting photos developed is a pain). So as long as you are happy with the 740's features, take the plunge.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 4:39 PM.