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-   -   Red Eye Reduction help (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/newbie-help-16/red-eye-reduction-help-7951/)

Salvin Mar 18, 2003 10:55 AM

Red Eye Reduction help
 
I am a first time buyer and I really could use some advice on what cameras offer the best red eye reduction performance. I do not want to fix the red eye on every single picture all the time.

Right now, I am thinking of purchasing either a Canon A60, Nikon Coolpix 2100 or a Kodak CX4230.

Any suggestions in general about those cameras are welcome too. I have been saving money for months just for my first digital camera purchase and I want to make sure I get the best one for me. Thanks. :?:

gibsonpd3620 Mar 18, 2003 12:24 PM

"Red-Eye - An effect caused by an electronic flash reflecting off of the human eye and making it look red. Compact cameras with the flash located close to the lens suffer the worst from this problem. Pro photographers use a bracket to hold an external flash unit above and off to the side of the lens to eliminate red-eye." The cameras you have mentioned will all have red eye problems. You will need a camera that can support an external camera flash. Cameras that support such a flash are more expensive than the ones you mentioned.

lg Mar 19, 2003 9:31 PM

Couldn't have said it better, Phil!

Gimli Mar 20, 2003 5:06 AM

What about the cameras with "red-eye reduction" flashes?

Do those really work? I don't think it does for my camera, it takes like 1-3 flashes before the actually shutter does its thing.

Does anyone know of a nice Photoshop trick to get rid of redeye, it supposed to be a "easy" thing do to but the tutorials I've seen, all go a differnet way.

Thanx!

voxmagna Mar 20, 2003 6:45 AM

With most compact cams and built in flashes, red-eye is inherent for all the reasons given, external flash and with head angle adjustment can help. Choose a cam with a shoe if red eye will concern you. Multiple red eye flash sometimes works, but I've found subjects relax their pose or move on the first flash. If they've been drinking and pupil reactions slow and dilate, multiple flash doesn't work well either - and reduces batt. capacity.

Most software looks for a red colour match in the pic area, my packages need to know roughly where that is. Even then I would always check what the editor has done. I don't think there is a simple batch mode to apply to a bunch of files. Don't think software can tell the difference between red eye and other red in the scene.

BillDrew Mar 20, 2003 7:45 AM

I agree - the red-eye reduction preflash solution is somewhat like dropping an anvil on your foot to cure an ingrown toenail: it just trades one problem for another, and doesn't always solve the first problem.

There are two solutions to red-eye:
1) Don't use a flash
2) Make sure the flash is well away from the lens axis.

Salvin Mar 20, 2003 1:27 PM

Thanks for the info.

I currently own a Minolta 35mm camera and the red eye reduction flash uses two preflashes so either people in the picture would turn their heads after the first flash or I always have to tell everyone "OK, there are three flashes", very annoying.

Gibsonpd3620 is right, it seems the closer the lens is to the flash, the worse it is. I have been borrowing a Kodak DX3500 for a couple of days and I have absolutely zero red eye in all my test pictures (and it only requires one flash). It is a wider camera and they have positioned the lens further away from the flash than all the other digicams I have tried. The downfall is that most of the reviews I've read of Kodaks say they do not have good picture quality. I have also noticed that it takes a little longer than I would like in between shots.

I want a camera (min. 2MP, 2xOP zoom) that is quick on the draw, does a great job of reducing red eye, produces good quality prints and has a comfortable hand grip so I can grip the camera with one hand while positioning the baby and the toddler with the other hand.

Does anyone have any suggestions on a digital camera that fits these requirements? (The Kodak DX3500 does not- no zoom) From what I have read, the Canon A series line would be perfect but I just cannot deal with the constant red eye since 99% of my subjects will be people. For that reason alone is why I am stearing away from them.

Thanks for all your help!

jsmeeker Mar 20, 2003 5:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gimli
What about the cameras with "red-eye reduction" flashes?

Do those really work? I don't think it does for my camera, it takes like 1-3 flashes before the actually shutter does its thing.

Does anyone know of a nice Photoshop trick to get rid of redeye, it supposed to be a "easy" thing do to but the tutorials I've seen, all go a differnet way.

Thanx!

In my experience, no, not really. The surest way to not get red-eye with flash is to go with external flash. Get the flash far away from the lens.

If you use Photoshop Elements 2.0, it has a red-eye brush tool. Use that. Works pretty good. You might want to burn in the pupils a bit after you are done if they are not black enough.


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