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Old Sep 16, 2006, 1:45 PM   #1
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I am a recent convery to film and I was curious as to what "enlargement" on my compuer is the actual size and proportion of the image.When I take a picture with my dslr, and open it with Adobe Elements, at the bottom of the screen it will say 18.65% and 154.09 cm x 102.73 cm (72 ppi). So in other words, what % do I use so I can look at the image at the way it is intended to be viewed? When I look at an image at 18.65%, often times it does not look good. there are jagged edges etc. Once I enlarge it, it then looks better and clearer.

Thanks- Ken




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Old Sep 16, 2006, 2:55 PM   #2
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Your screen is probably something like 1024 by 800 pixels. If you are using a DSLR then the picture is likely to be at least 3000 by 2000 pixels. Your screen is simply not capable of displaying the whole picture at full resolution. If you look at the view menu you'll see an option for actual pixels. This will show part of the picture at full resolution but you can't see the whole picture. Alternatively you can set the picture window to full screen and zoom in until you get the largest size possible on the screen.
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Old Sep 16, 2006, 5:13 PM   #3
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Thanks for the reply. I checked at my jpeg was 4368x2912. I undersatnd some of what you said, but not all. I If click on actual pixels, this will show me the actual quality?

Thanks- Ken
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Old Sep 16, 2006, 5:45 PM   #4
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ken6217 wrote:
Quote:
what "enlargement" on my compuer is the actual size and proportion of the image.
Quote:
what % do I use so I can look at the image at the way it is intended to be viewed?
The image from your camera is simply a collection of pixels, it does not have a "size" in inches or cm, it only has a size expressed by the total number of pixels in its width and height.

How its intended to be viewed ? Well that depends on you and what you want to do with the photo.

Are you going to print at 4x6, 8x10, 20x30, or maybe display it on a billboard 50ft high?

How far away are you going to view it from ?

That large poster you print may look nice on the wall 4ft away, but totally crappy with your nose pressed against it and peering though a powerful magnifing glass.

Lets say on your monitor you view it normally 1 pixel for 1 pixel, and lets say your monitor is set to 1024x768.

That would mean your photo is over 4 times the width of your screen and you will be able to see every pixel that makes up the image.

And that will still be a false way to look at it.

A picture when printed for "photo quality" is typically printed at around 300 pixels per inch, ie 300 pixels for every inch across or down on the paper.

Viewing 1 pixel on the monitor for 1 pixel of the photo, would mean you viewing 1024pixels, across a monitor around 13 inches wide ( for a typical 17in crt ), so you get to see across 13 inches what would normally be printed at 3.5 inches.

So really the best way to view a photo is print it at the size you want, or if you are going to print at a large size (A3+) and don't want to waste paper and ink, crop a 4x6 piece or 8x10 piece out of the photo and print on the smaller, cheaper paper, so you can at least get an idea on what the image will look like and judge if its ok before beginning the full size printing.
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Old Sep 16, 2006, 7:27 PM   #5
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Sintares covered pretty much everything. I just want to add, that with Photoshop, when you veiw your pictures, it's better to view it using rounded-off even percentages... Like "20%" instead of 17.5%... this fixes jagged edges you see on your screen, but it (obviously) doesn't affect printing.


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Old Sep 17, 2006, 8:30 AM   #6
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Wow, Great replies. I guess then that the true method of viewing the picture quality is printing it out. By the way, I did check and my monitor was set for 1024x768. I did go and change the settings to my monitor's maximum resolution of 1920 x 1200, and the picture quality was better.

Thanks- Ken
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Old Sep 22, 2006, 8:17 AM   #7
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There is no way to make your monitor behave like a print. It is not a print, nor is a print like your monitor.

When I edit my photos I make two versions, one for printing and one for web display. The web display one is resized to max 600x700 and then sharpened, this looks good on screen. You have to optimize your images for the intended method of display (big prints, little prints, web, etc) for best results.

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Old Sep 24, 2006, 3:16 PM   #8
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Unrelated to the image size question, but related to the question in the heading, is monitor calibration--how to get the image on your computer monitor as close as possible in terms of color reproduction, contrast, and brightness, to what you will see when you do print it.

http://www.alpenglowimaging.com/monitor-calibration.htm

Also, not only important for printing, but so you know you're seeing something close to what everyone else is seeing on their screen.


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