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Old Dec 21, 2006, 4:48 PM   #1
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It doesnt matter what lighting, setting, auto, high ISO, Low ISO. The only time I dont get GRAIN is when I turn everything up to the point of over exposure.

I am crying like a little girl right now. AND I DONT CRY. I know this isnt a junk camera, I know I can take pictures, what is WRONG.

I have read the manual, surfed the wed, taken well over 3500 pics since Dec 2nd, well now IM MAD AND CRYING!!

Feel ripped off, taken advantage of, defeated... just awful inside. I still stare at that 'alefh BILHGSDJEELH' on its little tripod MOCKING ME! Come on little girl, few more pics and we'll get it right.

Im again seduced by this marvelous piece of equipment just to be left screaming I WANT MY EX BACK, YOU SUCK (lil canon ez share that never took a bad pic).

Im fairly bright, I knew I wasnt going to pick this cam up and point and shoot. But was ready to move up. HA! What a joke.


*cries*

Here, did these today on aaaaall kinds of different settings, mostly in auto... AFTER ALL I CANT GET IT RIGHT! Just looked at them and Im sitting here now crying.

http://s32.photobucket.com/albums/d31/picsofbaby/


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Old Dec 21, 2006, 6:01 PM   #2
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Mikaela, Steve, in his review of this camera, said, ...All users will enjoy the smooth essentially noise-free images shot at ISO 80, while sports shooters will appreciate the ability to shoot full-resolution images at ISO 800 and 1600. Image noise is usually present in consumer digicams at high sensitivities, and the S9000 is no exception. Noise can be detected in shadows at ISO 200, in highlight areas at ISO 400, and is noticeable throughout the image at settings of ISO 800 and 1600. There's also a noticeable loss of image detail at ISO 800 and 1600, the result of in-camera noise reduction.

I looked at your bird pix and they do seem more grainy than the sample images Steve posted for his test pix for the same ISO.

All the pix I saw were shot at very low shutter speeds -- around the 1/4 second mark. This could contribute to a noisier image. You may benefit by using the flash and shooting at ISO 80 or shooting in higher ambient light so that you can use a lower ISO and a more reasonable shutter speed. A higher shutter speed would take care of the bird blur that can be seen in some of the shots.

Did you post those pix straight out of the camera, or did you run them through an editor first? They remind me of pix that were initially underexposed and then brightened in post processing. You always get more noise doing that.

You should be able to get rid of a lot of the noise in the pix you already shot by running them through a noise-reduction program like Neat Image or Noise Ninja, both of which have free versions available.

Hope you find some of this useful!

Grant
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Old Dec 21, 2006, 6:06 PM   #3
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Was there a question in there somewhere? :-)

I skimmed through a few of the photos, and you were only getting shutter speeds of around 1/4 second at ISO 400 and only 1/8 second at ISO 800.

You don't have enough light.

BTW, even using a "little tripod", you can get some blur from camera shake if you're not very careful when you squeeze the shutter button at shutter speeds that slow. Using a cable release or a self timer is preferred when you get into that range.

And, for a non-stationary subject, that won't help reduce blur from subject movement. You'd need more light. lol

Any camera has limitations.

Your lens has a widest available of f/2.8 at it's wide angle end (least apparent magnification). On it's full telephoto end, the widest available aperture is only f/4.9. So, your lens is about 3 times as bright on it's wide end. So, don't zoom in any more than necessary (as you'll lose light as you zoom in more).

For low light photos without a flash, a DSLR model using a brighter prime (non zoom) lens is often preferred for non-stationary subjects, even with higher ISO speeds available. Otherwise, you can get some blur from subject movement when light is too low.

If you want to try using higher ISO speeds with your camera, and want to reduce the appearance of noise (grain) in your images, there are products designed to do just that. Here are two of the more popular ones:

Noiseware (note that the stand alone "Community Edition" you'll find on the download page is free for home use).

Neat Image (note that the stand alone demo version is free for home use and doesn't expire).

It's a good idea not to underexpose any at higher ISO speeds (as noise tends to be worse in underexposed areas). So, if your photos are not bright enough for the way the camera meters the scene, use Exposure Compensation to help nail the exposure (a +EV setting will give you a brighter exposure compared to the way the camera is metering the scene, and a -EV setting will give a darker exposure compared to the way the camera is metering a scene).




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Old Dec 21, 2006, 8:31 PM   #4
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Thanks ya'll

I let it get to me, just want to make pretty pictures.

I printed this. I will refer to it as I shoot hundreds more pics tomorrow.

My house is kinda dark, also MOST of the light comes from the continuous burning florescent light in the kitchen. It burns up, not down. Like in a box, Florida house. I burn it even during the day.

Could that be the issue? I need to change light settings? I am also using incadescent (couldnt have spelled that more incorrectly if I tried) and natural light in the house.

I like to shoot at ISO 800 or 1600 because I take pics of my car while Im racing and my birdies move. When I jack the ISO up... no blur.

See the car shots? All are action shots. FAST car, no blur.

Have I turned out one single pic that I can use as a guide... what I should be 'shooting for'? Even One? If so, please tell me which. Maybe that will help me.

Yall rock.
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Old Dec 21, 2006, 8:52 PM   #5
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*rolls around the floor in agony*

Tell me what settings to use. PLEASE! Like what shutter speed... anything.

Tell me what you would set your cam to.

I done and got redneck with this daggone thing and cursed it like a dog!

PMS or bad pics... you be the judge but Im seeing a sledge hammer in my future grrr.




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Old Dec 22, 2006, 4:51 AM   #6
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Hi Mikaela,

Although the above advice may for some be hard to understand it is sound. You said "My house is kinda dark". I believe thisis your problem. Having my first DSLR for about four months now having enough light is the first major lesson I've learned. More light - Less Noise. I suggest do a little experiment. Pick an object and photograph itthe way you would normally photograph your bird then take the same object outside where you will have a lot more light and photograph it there. I think you will find a substantial difference.

Hope this helps a little.
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Old Dec 22, 2006, 6:18 AM   #7
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I have a question for Jim (just butting in here trying to learn as much as possible)

Does that mean she can never get good pics inside her own house with this particular camera?
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Old Dec 22, 2006, 7:58 AM   #8
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Look.. Most cameras are going to have a lot of difficulty trying to take photos of a non-stationary subject indoors without a flash, especially in a darker room.

Grant already suggested trying lower ISO speeds and using a flash, or taking photos with more ambient light.

That's why cameras have a flash. ;-) This Fuji will also take an external flash (so you can bounce one and get a more diffused light source).

Light is a cameras best friend. If you don't have enough, add some.

If the Original Poster wants to keep taking photos in a darker room and doesn't like the noise from higher ISO speeds (and higher ISO speeds will allow faster shutter speeds to reduce blur), I've already suggested free software to reduce it.

But, at shutter speeds that slow, you're still going to get some blur if the subject even breathes hard.

I also suggested not zooming in as much to help keep shutter speeds faster. But, shutter speeds are still going to be relatively slow in that lighting.

You can't get good photos in some conditions, no matter what camera you use. Every camera has limitations (as I already pointed out, too). What more can we say?

Read the posts already written and try the suggestions.

Light is a camera's best friend. If you don't have enough for the camera you're shooting with, add some (or just don't take photos in those conditions if you want optimum results).

Some of the images came out better than I would have expected (especially of a bird using a 1/4 second shutter speed). lol They don't look too bad at smaller viewing sizes and you could even spruce them up a bit using an editor.

But, you can expect a lot of blurry photos at shutter speeds that slow with a non-stationary subject.

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Old Dec 22, 2006, 8:03 AM   #9
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MichelleBuerre wrote:
Quote:
I have a question for Jim (just butting in here trying to learn as much as possible)

Does that mean she can never get good pics inside her own house with this particular camera?
I'll put my oar in here: So long as she wants to shoot hand-held without flash or other added light, she will not be able to get low noise pictures in her house. Or any other low light situation.

Mikaela, try some experiments to figure out the limits of your camera. If you sit outdoors at sundown, shoot the same scene repeatedly as it gets darker. Since the only difference between shots will be light level, you should be able to figure out what is workable for you. Keep that in mind, and either add flash or give up when it gets that dark.
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Old Dec 22, 2006, 10:24 AM   #10
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MichelleBuerre wrote:
Quote:
I have a question for Jim (just butting in here trying to learn as much as possible)

Does that mean she can never get good pics inside her own house with this particular camera?
Essentially, yes. Doesn't sound like her house has enough light, and small sensor cameras (all point and shoots) need lots of light.

The larger sensor (more area to pick up more light, less noise) is why dSLRs are popular. Of course, then you're dealing with all the dSLR "issues" (size, cost, lenses, etc). If you want low light pictures (and I'm not talking candle light), the dSLR will give the best results.

Russ


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