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Old Jan 7, 2007, 1:21 PM   #1
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Firstly i just wanna know how all you folks keep your camera so still when takin your pictures ( I don't mean with a Tripod) I look at your photographs and think "amazing shots"...Then i try taking a shot and all i get is camera shake...What or where am i going wrong...Every shot comes out blurry...

Should i grab a handful of Valium or down a bottle of Brandy first...To com my nerves...Only thing is i'm not a nervous person...Please help i've tried different stances and holding the camera each and every way possible but still not getting a steady hold of things....

Please give me some advice as to get around this or are we all in the same boat....
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Old Jan 7, 2007, 1:28 PM   #2
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why don't you post sample pics. chances are there's not enough light that the camera has to use longer shutter speed. post pics with exif data intact so we can see what's wrong.

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Old Jan 7, 2007, 1:33 PM   #3
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I haven't got any shoots as i've hated them so have deleted them from my card

Auto is fine but i just can't get round the manual settings only just learning about this camera...30D
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Old Jan 7, 2007, 5:44 PM   #4
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Andrew, a very quick rule of thumb is to get a sharp, non shaking image is to set a shutter speed of

1/focal length in 35mm terms.

What does this mean.....???

If you are using 200mm then with the 1.6x crop on the 30D it would become 320mm somake sure you have1/320th minimum. If it is 50mm lens then it is equal to 80mm so 1/80th or higher. You can do this in a few different ways by probably the easiest is to go for P mode then using the top dial (just behind the shutter release) you can adjust the shutter andthe aperture will adjust to match. If when setting the shutter to the fastest possible it is still not high enough then increase the ISO.

Hope this helps.
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Old Jan 7, 2007, 5:54 PM   #5
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Hey thanks Mark, I'll try it....I really wanted to learn how to use Manual mode but it's as broad as it is long i'll have to learn all settings eventually..

Did you have a good day sunday...?????
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Old Jan 7, 2007, 5:58 PM   #6
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Yep had a good day and got a few shots taken (check out sports section for a little more kitesurfing).

I personally don't use full manual much rather I go for Av (aperture value/aperture priority) and then let the camera sort out shutter from this.... I do play with exposure compensation as well depending what I'm shooting. The reason for me doing this is that I want to control the depth of field (usually making it as small as possible by going for wide apertures - small f number - as this isolates the subject and the knock on effect is a faster shutter speed which is generally good for sports). I do use manual for indoor sports shooting and outdoors when there is consistent light.

Will catch you in a few days as I'm away until Thurs.

Happy shooting!!!

Mark
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Old Jan 7, 2007, 6:09 PM   #7
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Have a good time and don't forget you Camera...!!!!
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Old Jan 7, 2007, 8:01 PM   #8
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May I add that a lot of beginners get motion blur in their pictures by jabbing at the shutter button. You might do better by being conscious of squeezing the shutter gently rather than hitting it too hard or fast. FWIW.
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Old Jan 8, 2007, 5:45 AM   #9
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I always use auto focus if conditions allow...So it's half pressed anyway...Thanks thought....
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Old Jan 8, 2007, 1:13 PM   #10
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wrams,
Another thing to look at is exactly how you're holding the camera (since you said you're not on a tripod.)

This is something I haven't seen discussed much on the web (lots of places will tell you proper long-lens technique on a tripod.) I don't really know why... I just haven't seen good articles about it.

This is what I do:
- Keep your elbows in. If you can, keep them resting on your body/torso.
- Lean into the camera slightly (i.e. press your face into it slightly.) The act of pressing it will hold is steady. (This might apply more to tripod use, but I've heard it for hand-held too.)
- Keep your left hand a reasonable length down the lens, cupped under the lens barrel. If you have a tripod color, rotate it up out of the way. You want your hand on the lens barrel, not on the tripod foot.
- Follow through on shots. Don't stop panning once you've taken the shot (for sports stuff, which it sounds like you do.) Keep panning for a few moments afterwards. I don't know why this helps, but I've heard it from several people.

Eric
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