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Old Feb 8, 2007, 2:18 PM   #1
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I saw the sample pictures on here and Steve's pics looked like they had good color so what could I be doing wrong? Here's a sample...all my inside photos have a very bad yellowish tint.
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Old Feb 8, 2007, 2:20 PM   #2
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Make that all my flash pictures.
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Old Feb 8, 2007, 5:29 PM   #3
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Incandescent lights have a yellowish tint to them that our brains correct for naturally, but that cameras (digital and film) can't, so the pictures we take record the yellowish tint.

With film cameras,we needed to use filters to correct the colorbalance or adjust the balancewhen developing the prints.Digital cameras, however, contain computers that can correct for this when they are set properly.

It may be that the "White Balance" feature on your camera is at the wrong setting.
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Old Feb 9, 2007, 1:09 AM   #4
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I'm not familiar with your camera, but most cameras adjust white balance for the flash when it is being used. Indoor lights tend to have a strong yellow/orange cast. This is a mixed lighting situation and to correct it you will either have to forego the use of flash and balance the color to the indoor lighting, or turn the lights down or off when shooting flash pictures.

There are lights which are color balanced to be more like daylight, and these would help a lot if you are always going to be taking pics in the same place.

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Old Feb 9, 2007, 5:40 AM   #5
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Also, you could correct the white balance in post processing. That is, the software that came with your camera could do it.
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Old Feb 9, 2007, 11:08 AM   #6
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I'll look and see if I might changed the tuning of the camera. I use picasa to clean up the pictures but it seems to decrease the quality of the picture.
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Old Feb 9, 2007, 6:39 PM   #7
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sappy wrote:
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I'll look and see if I might changed the tuning of the camera. ...
How are you going to look? The best way is to use an EXIF reader to see what the settings were.
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Old Feb 9, 2007, 10:33 PM   #8
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I have no idea what you just said! :sad:
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Old Feb 10, 2007, 12:25 AM   #9
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Hey There,

When I was a beginner photographer a few years ago, I noticed that whenever I used the flash, I either got a slightly yellow tint, or a super bright white light that was overpowering for almost any shot, and usually the latter was the result. (Canon PowerShot A75) Perhaps what is happening is when you use the flash, your camera is automatically adding a slight yellow tint to the exposure (internal, not to the flash itself) to create a more natural lighting. As other have said, most all light, natural or not, has yellow tints, and when you have a super bright white, a slight amount of yellow creates a more appealing picture. If it is too much, then look in your cameras menu for a light adjustment setting. My old Canon had things life flourescent, incondecent, cloudy skies, etc. to compensate for the different lighting conditions. Play around with it and see what you get.

-=Greg=-
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Old Feb 10, 2007, 6:48 AM   #10
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sappy wrote:
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I have no idea what you just said! :sad:
And that is your basic problem: you need to learn about digital photography. You have made a good start by noticing a problem and thinking that it might be able to be solved.

The top (header) of the computer file that holds your image holds metadata (EXIF) about the picture - f/stop, shutter speed, ISO, file name, ..., and white balance setting. Likely a program came with your camera which can read that data. If not, there are several freeware programs - EXIFER (http://www.exifer.friedemann.info/) is one example.

Learning how to use an EXIF reader is one of the basic things you should learn about digital photography. It will help to solve all sorts of problems, or at least understanding how they happen. In this case, the flash is the light source. Almost certainly the camera is expecting the light to be daylight, albeit shady, cloudy, sunsetty, ... or whatever other options your camera has.

Most often, a digicam willset the white balance to match the flash whenever the flash is being used. But that likely will depend on the flash setting, e.g., fill flash, always on, ... That setting should also show up in the EXIF data.
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