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Old Mar 1, 2007, 8:40 AM   #1
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For someone new and wanting quality photos . . . would you consider the Hoya Filter kits to be a good place to start? I want the UV, Circular Polarizing and the Warming 81A type kit vs. buying seperately? Previously I've only used filters on my old Minolta SLR but never before on any of my digital cameras.

Thanks in advance.

Deana
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Old Mar 1, 2007, 3:50 PM   #2
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With digital photograpy filters are not really necessary.
Warming filter is now replaced by WB (white balance) or post processing.
However, saying that, I do use them, (UV)if only to protect the lens from damage.
You will find many here are for and against filters in equal numbers.
To answer your question, Hoya is a good, reliable brand, buy the best quality you can afford.
After all, you get what you pay for.

Edit: Circ. Pola. can be tricky if the lens rotates on AF.

You might want Cokin graduated ND 4 or 8 for landscape.


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Old Mar 1, 2007, 5:44 PM   #3
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For the Cokin ND . . . we will be going to Hawaii in June and would the 4 or 8 be better for bright sun? We also go to Florida a lot to Disney with bright sun.

Thanks,

Deana


p.s. I'll be buying filters for a Minolta A200 and a Canon PS 3 . . . so was hoping to share by buying a step-ring from 49-52 for the Minolta and buying the 52mm filters and the 52mm Lensmate adapter. Hopefully that would all work together.
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Old Mar 1, 2007, 7:10 PM   #4
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I'd suggest a tripod instead of a graduated ND filter. See http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...xposures.shtml

It can be done without a tripod, but is easier with one.

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p.s. I'll be buying filters for a Minolta A200 and a Canon PS 3 . . . so was hoping to share by buying a step-ring from 49-52 for the Minolta and buying the 52mm filters and the 52mm Lensmate adapter. Hopefully that would all work together.
The possible problem with that is vignetting at the widest angle.
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Old Mar 2, 2007, 8:15 AM   #5
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Thanks for the link. That would be neat to learn how to do those photoshop specialty maneuvers.

Deana
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