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Old Jun 30, 2007, 4:15 PM   #11
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seerskater,
sorry had to run before I could finish my posts, we are packing for a week of kayaking.

My pervious post was comparing DSLR to film SLR, and the shutter lag is similar in them because the large mirror in them has to move out of the way.
If you include film rangefinders and film P&S which do not have a mirror assembly then yes their shutter lag should be almost non-existant.

rinniethehun,
actually I reread the posts and no one is arguing with you :!:
What Eric, Brian and I said is valid for most P&S (else people would not be complaining about the long lag times).
None of us said it could not be done, or is not done by some manfacturers.
From what I read Kodak Easyshares have some of the shortest lag time.

However: If you want to put all the cameras on the same footing in your comparisons.
IE: remove all the user settable options that can affect lag time:
Then turn off autofocus, autoexposure, auto WB, any stabilization in all the cameras and turn on mirror lockup in the dslr. (taking the reflex mirror out of the equasion will remove more than 50ms from the DSLR lag time alone).

Of course doing this is not real world usage, most people do want the camera to do auto everything.

Peter.
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Old Jun 30, 2007, 5:44 PM   #12
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PeterP wrote:
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seerskater,
sorry had to run before I could finish my posts, we are packing for a week of kayaking.

My pervious post was comparing DSLR to film SLR, and the shutter lag is similar in them because the large mirror in them has to move out of the way.
If you include film rangefinders and film P&S which do not have a mirror assembly then yes their shutter lag should be almost non-existant.
Sorry! Yes, I was comparing digital SLR's to film cameras that were not SLR.:roll: Please bear with me as I slowly crawl out of the pit of noobdom.

Since the mirror flipping up in SLR cameras greatly increases the shutter lag, why don't I seeas manydigital rangefinder cameras on the market? I see a few, but they don't seem to be as popular as the SLR's, and arethey are a lot moreexpensive.
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Old Jun 30, 2007, 8:24 PM   #13
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You do realize that it requires instrumentation to even measure the times in question? As I have pointed out in another thread, average human reaction time is 1/2 sec. or more (500mS). The complaints about shutter lag really only apply when using the camera autofocus and exposure settings. When you switch to manual mode, you are not going to notice anything under 100mS.

Arguing about a few milliseconds one way or another is a bad as pixel peeping.

brian
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Old Jun 30, 2007, 9:17 PM   #14
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The film rangerfinder camera is almost extinct except for the Leica probably due to the fact it can only accept a modest range of lenses compared to an SLR. Telephoto is limited to a maximum of about 135mm by the rangefinder and very wide angle lenses require auxilliary viewfinders. It also has parallex problems when the subject is close to the camera. SLR/DSLRs don't have these problems.

While it's an excellent tool for street and event photography it has been pushed out of most other areas of photography by the SLR.

Leica has only recently brought out a digital version of the classic rangefinder and only time will tell if the genre is successful. The DSLR is the current lead dog now just as the SLR is in the film world.
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Old Jul 1, 2007, 7:04 AM   #15
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It depends on the brand and model, my uncle had a digicam that was so slow that you needed to only take set shots no candid. Mine works pretty well. dSLR's are real fast depending on if you use flash since it has to wait for that.
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Old Jul 1, 2007, 2:49 PM   #16
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pagerboy wrote:
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It depends on the brand and model, my uncle had a digicam that was so slow that you needed to only take set shots no candid. Mine works pretty well. dSLR's are real fast depending on if you use flash since it has to wait for that.
Sounds like my old P&S digicam. With enough practice, you'll be able to anticipate the action and press the shutter button well beforehand.


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