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Old Jun 28, 2007, 12:04 PM   #1
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Why is the shutter lag in digital cameras so much more than in film cameras? I know that digital cameras have to focus before they take the picture, but even whenI prefocus my camera it seems to be slower than my film cameras. Why is this? Am i missing something obvious here? :?
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Old Jun 28, 2007, 1:07 PM   #2
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Correct question shoud be why do point&shoot digitals have so much lag time compared to film cameras.

DSLR's do not have much lag time, it is measured in milisoconds and matches film based SLR's.

The answer is processor speed, digital cameras are basically computers.
DSLR's have a lot of computing power built in, usually with several dedicated processors to handle the differennt tasks. Point&Shoots do not, and quite ofter only have one not so fast processor trying to handle everything.

Peter.
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Old Jun 28, 2007, 2:31 PM   #3
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I agee with PeterP, but will add this.
It is about money. If they wanted to, they could do it. But they don't choose to because it will raise the price or lower their profit.

Simple as that.


Eric

ps. Well, ok. another issue is that it might make the camera larger. That effects mroe than just cost - but it effects cost too.
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Old Jun 28, 2007, 9:02 PM   #4
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" DSLR's do not have much lag time, it is measured in milisoconds and matches film based SLR's."

Absolutely untrue...there is not a DSLR on the market that has a shutter lag measured in milliseconds. The shortest lag time I'm aware of in a DSLR is on the 1Ds Mark II, which is 0.052 seconds (pre-focused lag), hardly in the millisecond range. As a comparison, the Fuji S9100's (a point & shoot digital) pre-focused lag time is 0.010 seconds, which is considerably faster.

Some other pre-focused lag times (all taken from the same professional review site):

DSLR's

A-100 = 0.116 seconds
XTI = 0.105 seconds
K100D = 149 seconds

P&S's

Canon G7 = 0.073 seconds
S3IS = 0.088 seconds
Fuji F30 = 0.018 seconds

I don't think it has anything to do with money or size.

the Hun


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Old Jun 28, 2007, 11:33 PM   #5
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What do you think a millisecond is? :-)

Here is a convenient table of camera lag times
http://www.lightningtrigger.com/Came...atibility6.htm
BTW the new 1d-mkiii has a standard 55ms shutter lag and optional 40ms shutter lag time mode settable by custom function

Shutter lag:
http://www.dummies.com/WileyCDA/Dumm...e/id-3288.html

rinniethehun wrote:
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Absolutely untrue...there is not a DSLR on the market that has a shutter lag measured in milliseconds.
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Old Jun 28, 2007, 11:53 PM   #6
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Part of the reason is that digitals have a lot more 'thinking' to do prior to operating the shutter, and that the shutter is open to start with. The camera calculates things like White Balance and exposure, based partly on user settings. If you use Auto WB, the camera has to calculate that. Fixed or flexible ISO? Does the image match any of the scene types programmed in? Flash. fill, redeye reduction, or other setting?

With all these things figured, the camera now closes the shutter, stops down the aperture, and resets the sensor. Then it actually takes the picture.

If you use manual settings for all of the above, the shutter lag will be very minimal.

brian
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Old Jun 29, 2007, 4:28 PM   #7
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PeterP wrote: .

DSLR's do not have much lag time, it is measured in milisoconds and matches film based SLR's.




They do ?I read somewhere that the average shutter lag of a film camera is 0.015 seconds. If that's true (it might not be), I can't seem to find many DSLR's matching that.



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Old Jun 29, 2007, 5:58 PM   #8
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"What do you think a millisecond is?"

A millisecond is one thousandth of a second (0.001 second). 10 milliseconds is equal to one hundredth of a second (0.01 seconds). 100 milliseconds is equal to one tenth of a second (0.1 seconds). Now I guess you could say that a camera which has a shutter lag of 0.998 seconds is measured in milliseconds (998 milliseconds), or 2.5 seconds (2,500 milliseconds) for that matter, but I wouldn't. I would consider 0.001 to 0.009 seconds to be in the millisecond range...but that's just my opinion.

"BTW the new 1d-mkiii has a standard 55ms shutter lag and optional 40ms shutter lag time mode settable by custom function"

How do you consider that to be faster than the S9100, which was tested at 0.010 seconds (10ms in your terminology), or the F30, which was tested at 0.018 seconds (18ms)? Dedicated processors? Lots of built in computing power? A couple of lowly P&S cameras faster than a $4000 DSLR? Perish the thought!!!

I don't think the OP's question has been answered yet.

the Hun



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Old Jun 30, 2007, 9:48 AM   #9
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Look at that table provided by lightning triggers
http://www.lightningtrigger.com/Came...atibility6.htm

They list both digital and film bodies, and most film bodies were in the 55ms -150ms range except for the Canon EOS RT which had a 8ms lag time because it did not have a mirror that had to be moved out of the way.

The RT had a fixed pellicle mirror which routed some light to the viewfinder and allowed the rest to pass through to the film.


seerskater wrote:
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They do ?I read somewhere that the average shutter lag of a film camera is 0.015 seconds. If that's true (it might not be), I can't seem to find many DSLR's matching that.
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Old Jun 30, 2007, 10:05 AM   #10
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Not my terminology :-) , try having a look around it is how most manufacturers and reviewers seem to rate their camera shutter lag.

rinniethehun wrote:
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0.010 seconds (10ms in your terminology),
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