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Old Aug 7, 2003, 11:58 AM   #1
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What is the best time to take a pictures of the sea/beaches?

What settings are recommended?

I have a Minolta Dimage 7i. I need to take several pictures of lanscapes. I have taken a few, but the results havenīt been the best. I guess the time had to do with it: 11:00 a.m.-1: 00 p.m. and 3:00 - 4:00 p.m. I live in the Caribbean and the sun is very strong here.

Thank you in advance,

Rualina
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Old Aug 7, 2003, 12:10 PM   #2
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You could use the exposure bracketing facility to try lots of different exposures for the same composition. Then you can use the best and throw the rest away.

If use Photoshop or Paint Shop Pro or similar, they have built in twiddling facilities that will automatically twiddle contrast, tonal range etc., in your selected images.
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Old Aug 7, 2003, 2:53 PM   #3
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I would put the D7i in the Sunset Program mode, ie the picture will be more saturated than normal and optimized for smaller aperture with larger Depht Of Field as well. Also make sure to use a polarizer filter (abeit a thin one to avoid any vignetting) to enhance the sky and reduce any water reflection:



Correction: Ooops faulty links!
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Old Aug 8, 2003, 2:56 AM   #4
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I think Alan T's advice is quite accurate, try bracketing.
Yes, early morning (prior to 10:00am) and late afternoon are invariably the best. They seem to work here in Hawaii which has a similar strong sunlight problem to the Dominican Republic.

Sometimes luck plays a part as in cloud shadows etc..

Take a look at:

http://www.stevesforums.com/phpBB2/v...ic.php?t=12856
To see some examples of pics taken under very bright sunlight.

If you go to my Pbase site you can view the pics individually and get an idea of the settings in the exif information.

http://www.pbase.com/selvin/misc

Aloha, Selvin
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Old Aug 8, 2003, 8:35 AM   #5
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Another thing to try is a 1 or 2 stop grad ND filter like the cokin #121.

I use the Cokin P series filters which are about 3-1/4 square,
so there is a fair bit of finger room with a small diameter lense for hand holding it if you don't have the proper holder for it.
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Old Aug 8, 2003, 8:45 AM   #6
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Check the EXIF on the above Photo It's around noon time! :lol:

Also remember on the D7i you have a very powerful WYSIWYG on manual. I.E. when you change aperture or shutter speed, you see exactly what's going to be stored to the flash card in the EVF as well. Plus turn on the real-time histogram in the viewfinder, it'll tell you where's the pixels are grouped!
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Old Aug 9, 2003, 4:46 AM   #7
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Actually the time of day is very important. The light changes throughout the day, and you must decide what kind of tone you want in your shot.
Just as important is the basic things like composition, aperture a.s.o.

Landscapes mostly are about these things - the light will give you the mood for the exact shot. There's is no overall rules for this. Improvise!

If you need some help on these issues, you're welcome to visit my website, which has some newbie tutorials!

Use the adress below.
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Old Aug 9, 2003, 6:32 AM   #8
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Ooops you guys are getting me wrong... Of course time of day is critical and would capture a different mood for each moment. My point is you can still capture a scene at high noon if you have to!

The reason I recommend Sunset is because I'm familiar with this camera's operation. For example: if Rualina was to look through the EVF while stepping through the various program mode icons, he can actually see the changes from warm/cool/saturate/contrast taking effect on the camera final result for each setting. Sunset mode just happened to be the optimized position for this camera since there's no landscape mode (and also the most saturate as opposed to the other program settings)... There's of course many other ways... but IMO this is the easiest for a starter!
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Old Aug 10, 2003, 5:54 AM   #9
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I've been wondering about this interesting thread. If you shoot very bright scenes with film, you are restricting the light with a real mechanical shutter and iris, you can also change the sensitivity by using 100 or 64 ASA stock. But don't digicams use electronic shutter control by turning on the sensor for the correct time?

Has anybody shot a really bright scene with the fastest shutter/small stop and compared results shooting the same scene at normal exposure settings and f8, using ND filters in front of the lens? Are the pics the same?

I just picked up on PeterP's post and he mentions a ND 'Grad' filter. I was thinking plain ND for this post, but the graduated filter is interesting to take out the strong sky/water light reflection, and I've read of a similar approach for sunrise/sunsets. So ladies and gents, does filtering before the lens do the same thing as playing with electronic shutter and aperture?
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Old Aug 10, 2003, 6:53 AM   #10
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Vox

It's called dynamic range, ie darkest to brightest, and you can only get so much (ie limited)... Even in the film day photographers are having problem taking pictures of weddings at noon with brides wearing white and grooms wearing black and the latitude of films (CCD or emulsion) can not span the entire range like our wonderful eyes!

ND will only make it shifts one way (ie less light) that's why they came out with graduated ND so at least you can control 1/2 of the scene, but the problem is the Carribean white sand which also resides in the other 1/2 and their bright blue water (ie you'll lose details in the shadow areas)!

From a CP990: -->

You can put the bright midday sun to good use though if you were to shoot under the awning of a beach cabana for example, it's reflection from the white sand from under can provide some indirect lighting as well (over using a flash fill)... The other option is to wait for the right cloud overhead to come over for help! :lol: :lol: :lol:
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