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Old Oct 21, 2007, 5:39 PM   #1
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Hello, I am 15 years old and have been photoshopping for about 3 years now, i have always loved photography but have always had a horrible family point and shoot camera, i am looking into getting a dslr camera so i can take my own photo's and hopefully start a new hobby

right now my mom has a canon rebel t2 which is simply the film version of the digital rebels

it has a 58mm lens, 28-90mm zoom, 4-5.6 aperture and it is a Canon Zoom EF Lens

i was looking into getting a Canon Rebel Xt simply because i has 8.0 megapixles .....many shutter speed times (i have always been interested by extended exposure), and many other great features.

so if i bought a rebel xt body could i just use the lens from the rebel t2 film camera to start off cheaper?

last question, do most tripods work for everything..as in are they universally threaded?..because i have a tripod from a camera that i think i could use for extended exposure shots and self portraits. thanks!
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Old Oct 21, 2007, 7:07 PM   #2
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Yes (lens would work), yes (tripod should be threaded the same way, unless it's designed for some special purpose).

But, that would give you a narrower angle of view (more apparent magnfication) on a dSLR model. Because of a smaller sensor in a dSLR, it will appear to be more like a 45-144mm lens from an angle of view perspective. Basically, you have to multiply the focal length of a lens used on an entry level Canon dSLR by 1.6x to see what focal length lens would give you the same angle of view (apparent magnfication) on a 35mm camera.

So, I'd probably go with a kit lens (i.e., 18-55mm) so that you have something starting out a bit wider for use in closer quarters in case you need it (since it doesn't add much to the price of a camera when you buy the camera and lens as a kit).

It all depends on the conditions you want to shoot in. Some people are just fine with a lens starting out at 28mm on a dSLR.


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Old Oct 21, 2007, 7:45 PM   #3
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Thank you for answering my questions, and yeh i understand what your saying...so if i just zoom this in too 45mm then thats what it would be like at 28 on the dslr...i see that i wouldnt like that too much lol, so yeh the kit sounds better, and then i can have this lens for a little more zoom if needed!

i have read up on things but some sound the same could you pick these words apart for me?

aperture (isnt 1.8 considered a big opening..and 11 a smaller opening?)
exposure(is it just the shutter speed?)
iso(how sensitive the sensor is too light?)
and a landscape shot would be good with a smaller hole (higher number) because it focuses everything?
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Old Oct 21, 2007, 7:59 PM   #4
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xiggy wrote:
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aperture (isnt 1.8 considered a big opening..and 11 a smaller opening?)
Yes. Aperture as expressed as f/stop as a ratio between the focal length of the lens and the diameter of the aperture iris opening. So, smaller f/stop numbers are larger openings.

With a prime (non zoom) lens, you will see one aperture listed.

With a zoom lens, you usually see two apertures listed (the largest available aperture at wide angle zoom setting, and the largest available aperture at the full telephoto zoom position). When in between the widest and longest focal length of the lens, the largest available aperture will fall somewhere in between the apertures shown.

Some higher quality zoom lenses can maintain a constant aperture throughout their zoom range (with f/2.8 being the most common). A lens that can maintain f/2.8 throughout it's focal range is a must have for some types of shots (i.e., night sports in a stadium under the lights). Otherwise, you're going to get nothing but motion blur, even at higher ISO speeds if you subject is moving. To put things into perspective, a lens with f/2.8 available is exactly 4 times as bright as a lens that only has f/5.6 available.

For many indoor conditions trying to shoot moving subjects without a flash, even f/2.8 may not be bright enough. Then, you may need to use a brighter prime (fixed focal length versus zoom, since you can find brighter primes versus zooms).

Lenses are rated by their largest available apertures (smallest f/stop numbers). But, most lenses can be set to use apertures of f/22 or smaller.

When you vary the aperture, you're controlling the iris in the lens (which like a pupil in your eye, can be opened up to let in more light or closed down to let less light in). So, this impacts the shutter speeds you'll need for proper exposure (since more or less light is getting through to the sensor).

The aperture scale in one stop increments (with larger than f/1 apertures theoritically available) goes f/1.0, f/1.4, f/2.0, f/2.8, f/4.0, f/5.6, f/8.0, f/11, f/16, f/22... With each one stop move to a smaller aperture (represented by higher f/stop numbers), you will need shutter speeds twice as long for proper exposure for the same lighting and ISO speed (only half the light gets through compared to a one stop larger aperture).

Here is a handy online expoure calculator that you can use to get anidea of the shutter speeds required for any EV and Aperture. But, make sure to use your camera's metering, as lighting can vary. This is only to give you an idea of how the relationship between light levels, aperture, ISO speed (shown as film speed in the calculator) and shutter speed works.

http://www.robert-barrett.com/photo/...alculator.html

Quote:
exposure(is it just the shutter speed?)
No, it's represenative of a combination of lighting, aperture, shutter speed and iso speed. It typically refers to how bright the image is (if it's too dark, it's underexposed, and if it's too bright, it's overexposed).

Quote:
iso(how sensitive the sensor is too light?)
Yes. Each time you double the iso speed, the camera can use shutter speeds twice as fast for the same lighting and aperture for proper exposure.

Quote:
and a landscape shot would be good with a smaller hole (higher number) because it focuses everything?
Maybe. You have to be careful setting aperture. Most lenses are sharper a couple of stops down from their widest setting. If you go with an opening that's too small, you can start get softer images with many lenses. Somewhere in the middle of the range is usually best.

You also have to keep shutter speed in mind (since if you use a smaller aperture opening, shutter speeds needed for proper exposure will be longer, which can lead to blur from camera shake and subject movement (and even wind blowing leaves on trees can cause some blur if your shutter speeds are too slow).

Aperture also impacts Depth of Field, as you seem to have figured out.

Thelarger the aperture opening (represented by smallerf/stop numbers), and the closer you are to your subject (focus distance), and the longer your focal length (amount of zoom used), the less depth of field you will have (less of the scene in focus, as you get further away from your focus point). Lenses with wider available apertures (smaller f/stop numbers) can be desirable to help subjects stand out from distracting backgrounds, too.

Here is an online depth of field calculator. Plug ina camera model, then change focal length, aperture and focus distance to see what impact aperture has.

http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html


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Old Oct 21, 2007, 8:02 PM   #5
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xiggy wrote:
Quote:
i have read up on things but some sound the same could you pick these words apart for me?

aperture (isnt 1.8 considered a big opening..and 11 a smaller opening?)
exposure(is it just the shutter speed?)
iso(how sensitive the sensor is too light?)
and a landscape shot would be good with a smaller hole (higher number) because it focuses everything?
Aperture is the size of the hole light passes through to get t the image sensor. Aperture is specified in terms of f-stops. The f-stop is the ratio of the diameter of the aperture to the focal length.

Shutter speed is the length of time the image sensor is exposed to light.

ISO Speed is the sensitivity of the image sensor to light.

Exposure is the combination of the aperture, shutter speed, and ISO speed.

Landscape shots are generally made at wide angles, and at wide angles you'll usually get plenty of depth of field anyway, so the aperture doesn't have much of an impact on the image.

Depth of field changes most at longer focal lengths, so that's where you need to pay attention to the aperture and the resulting depth of field.
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Old Oct 21, 2007, 8:08 PM   #6
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Thank you very much! I read a lot of this, but you definately cleared up my thoughts so i have an idea of what to do in certain situations, i may be getting the camera around Christmas, but for now i can mess around with the rebel t2, even though its film i can still mess with aperture and shutter speed!

What is your preferred digitalphotoediting program
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Old Oct 21, 2007, 8:13 PM   #7
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digiKam for basic corrections (color, contrast, sharpening, cropping...) for my needs. But, it's not available for Windows.


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Old Oct 21, 2007, 8:25 PM   #8
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well i use photoshop which seems to be the creme of the crop, i was just seeing if there was anything preferred over it for advanced operations
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Old Oct 21, 2007, 8:39 PM   #9
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Photoshop is very popular. On the downside, if you need support from raw files from new camera models, you may need to upgrade to a newer version of Photoshop for compatiblity with newer versions of Adobe Camera Raw (Photoshop CS only supports 2.x versions of Camera Raw, Camera Raw 3.x versions only work with Photoshop PS2, Camera Raw 4.x versions only work with Photoshop PS3).

IOW, Adobe has a habit of making new versions of plugins like Camera Raw incompatible with older versions of Photohop from time to time. So, if you want to use the newer Camera Raw plugin to support raw files from newer dSLR models, you may need to upgrade to a newer version of Photoshop.

You can find discussion on a lot of different editors in the Editors Forum

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Old Oct 21, 2007, 8:54 PM   #10
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I have cs3 so no worry's

now i have read a few articles but still dont understand the difference between shooting raw and shooting jpeg...from what i understand ...raw just takes up more room?..or is uncompressed? please explain!

also i find a deal like this (digital rebel xt body for $250)
http://www.expresscameras.com/prodet...57&start=1
is there any way in the world that could be real?
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