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Old Nov 29, 2007, 4:11 AM   #1
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Ijust received my new Canon Rebel Xti with the lens kit. I have been reading the manual trying to learn how to use it. This is my first SLR. I have to admit I have not had any lessons so I will be learning as I go along. I know I should practice, practice and practice.My only hope isto get some decent pictures not turn into a professional.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"My question can you trim a picture and save it on the card? I have a Panasonic DMCF7 that can trim and save. I just did not see the trim and save instructions on the Rebel.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Also, since I only had funds to get the lens kit to start with I would like some guidance as to what lens to get next. I like to take birds pictures and wildlife pic's And mostly scenery while on vacations. The lens with the stabilizer sounds right up my alley but out of my reach for right now.
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Old Nov 29, 2007, 10:28 AM   #2
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First, this question might have been better posted in the Canon EOS dSLRforum.

Second, the XTi does not have an equivalent feature to the "Trim & Save" of your Panasonic.

For that, the XTi relies on post processing, either with the applications that came with the camera, or aftermarket applications such as Photoshop or PaintShop Pro. This is true of a number of features that P&S digicams have. The presumption is that P&S owners may want to print straight from their cameras without using a computer as an intermediary, so the cameras can do some limited post processing on their own. DSLRs, on the other hand, very much presume post processing, and what you refer to as "Trim & Save" is referred to as "Cropping", which is a popular feature of all image editting applications.

Lastly, the two purposes you mentioned for additional lenses, wildlife and scenery, typically would require two different lenses. One would be a long lens, say 75-300mm to start, which isn't very expensive (~$200). The other would be a wide angle lens, but your kit 18-55 might be able to perform that function quite well.So we're not talking about a great deal of money (compared to the cost of your XTi).
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Old Nov 29, 2007, 4:50 PM   #3
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TCav, thank you for your reply!

I do have Paintshop Pro I can use to crop my pictures and sometimes I still use an version of Nikon view that I have on my computer.

As far as the additional lenses go, isthere a make or model of the75-300that you would suggest? I have been reading up up the lenses from Canon, Sigma and Tamron.I do not know were to start. Would any of them be light to carry on hikes?

Thanks again for the help.


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Old Nov 29, 2007, 7:18 PM   #4
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I'd say that the Sigma 70-300mm f/4-5.6 APO DG Macro (~$200), Tamron 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di LD 1:2 Macro (~$170) and the Canon EF 75-300mm f/4.0-5.6 III USM (~$190) would all be good choices, but I'll defer to Canon users.

The 70-300mm f/4-5.6 isa popular lens, and many companies have been making, and more important, improvingtheir versions for quite some time. These would be good quality lenses without a lot of surprises.

Photodo, PhotoZone and SLRGear aregreat places to see comparisons of lenses.
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Old Nov 30, 2007, 11:17 AM   #5
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regarding lenses for wildlife:

Before you run out and buy a lens, it's important to consider WHAT TYPES of wildlife you plan on shooting. That will drive what type of lens you need. In general, wildlife requires a LOT of reach. How much reach depends on what you want to shoot and how close you can get to it. Small birds in the wild (vs. a bird feeder for instance) will require A LOT of reach (think 400-600mm as a startiing point). So your subject choice will determine what focal length is required (500mm, 400mm, or 300mm)

Now, there are a couple other aspects to consider regarding long telephoto lenses.

1. How sharp is it? The budget lenses like the Canon 75-300 are fairly poor optically from 200-300mm. If you're shooting larger animals it isn't AS noticable. But the smaller your subject the sharper you need the lens to be because at only 300mm there's no way you're going to fill the frame with your subject. So with a very soft lens, once you crop the photo to make your subject larger the lack of sharpness really shows up.

2. What is the max aperture. This will affect what shutter speeds you can get. Most lenses will be 5.6/6.3 at 300mm plus. For wider apertures at that range you are into lenses costing $1000 plus - often A LOT MORE.

3. How fast / accurate does it focus. Not all lenses are created equal in this regard. Not by a long shot. The Canon 75-300 will focus much worse than the 70-300 does (they're both 5.6 aperture lenses). Again this is a place where the budget lenses save money.

4. Stabalization. At long focal lengths this can be very beneficial.

Before you buy a lens for wildlife I strongly suggest you get advice from people who shoot the subjects you want to shoot. If someone suggeests a given lens - find actual photos of wildlife with that lens to see how it will perform. Reviews are nice and all - but not relevant if the people revieiwing the lens aren't doing so with YOUR application (i.e. if I use a 75-300 for still shots only I may think its a great lens but if I use it or wildlife I may find it to be very poor - or I may find it to be acceptable). But the key here is that YOU WANT TO SEE PHOTOS. "good", "great", "acceptable" are all relative terms. If someone tells you a lens is great their interpretation of great may be VERY different from yours. But if you see actual photos then you can judge for yourself.

There are a TON of wildlife shooters in forums on the internet. If a lens is a good wiildlife lens you'll find someone using it. If you can't find anyone that uses a particular lens and has some photos to share that should be a warning flag. Either the lens is a poor performer at the task (and thus people don't use it) or it's new to the market and doesn't have a track record yet.
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Old Dec 1, 2007, 4:38 AM   #6
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I liketaking pictures of birds at the feeders, or further away on trees and in bushes. Sometimes I take bird shots right from my kitchen window thru the glass. I know it is not the best way but I do not want to spook the birds. As far as animals go they could be anywhere. I am going to Yellowstone this summer and hopefullyI will have learned how to use the camera by then. :G

I would to spend the bucks and get the image stabilizer lens, I have been checking out the prices at B&H. It would be wonderful to have it before going on vacation.

You gave me a lot to consider and thanks for your reply.


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Old Dec 1, 2007, 9:25 AM   #7
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For what you describe, especially about your vacation, I think you might be alternating between taking landscape shots and wildlife shots. Unless you want to be switching lenses (or carrying two cameras), I think you might be better off with the Tamron 18-250mm. It's not very bright, but for outdoor subjects (even when you're indoors)it should be fine. And whatever you can'treach with the 250mm, you can crop to with Paintshop Pro. (I took a photo of my wife competing in an equestiran event with my 3MP Nikon CoolPix 880, did a ~70% cropand printed it at 8X10. You need an eye loupe to see the pixelation.)
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Old Dec 1, 2007, 9:35 AM   #8
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You have no idea how painful it was for me to recommend a superzoom lens. I've been bashing superzooms ever since Iwas able to compare the shots I was getting from my 18-200 with other lenses, and I saw how bad the 18-200 was.

The 18-250 is a very much improved superzoom, argueably the best of it's kind, and it may serve you well.

I've got to go lie down now.
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Old Dec 2, 2007, 9:52 AM   #9
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Thanks for the suggestion of the Tamron 18-250mm. I read the review from B&H consumers on this lense and all were positive.
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Old Dec 2, 2007, 4:11 PM   #10
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You could also take a look at this:

http://www.popphoto.com/cameralenses...cro-page4.html
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