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Old Sep 9, 2003, 9:24 PM   #1
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Default My first digicam, a hard decision, please help me!

:?: Hi! I'm going to get my first digicam, I've only $350, I want a camara with manual features, I'm thinking about the canon A70, and the olympus C4000. I'm not sure about wich select because the Canon seems have more manual features than the olympus, and also record sound that is nice, but olympus (I think) is a better brand than canon, and it has 4 megapixels, altough for my necessities isn't important, I don't have a big printer.

Could somebody help me with my selection?, or recommend me other better camera than my choices.
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Old Sep 10, 2003, 2:17 PM   #2
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Well, it's kind of hard to compare a 3 & 4mp camera. You're really not looking at apples and apples, Do you know what I mean?
As far as Canon and Olympus go, they're both very good, reputable companies, you could hear arguments all day on which one people think is better and in the end be at the same place. As far as the Canon recording sound, it's neat but I wouldn't let that be a determining factor unless you know you're going to use it a lot. Personally, I've never used that feature but, that's just me. As far as the manual controls go, from what I can see, Olympus has just as many as the Canon.
It really comes down to megapixels, price and personal preferance. Do you need 4mp??? How much do you crop your photos? If you crop them a lot, 4 mp will be nice to have. Which camera feels better in your hands and which interface on the camera do you like better? Lastly, look at photo's taken with the camera. Go to pbase.com, click on Search >Search for photos by camera and then pick the cameras you're looking at. Most of the pics are amateur photos so, you can get an idea of what the camera is capable of in the hands of an average user. My link at the bottom has some A70 pics too in everything except the "older" section.
I hope this helps.

Mark
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Old Sep 13, 2003, 7:13 PM   #3
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you should be concerned with print quality better known as pixels per inch (or cm).

to get good quality prints you should be looking for a camera that records @ at least 192 pixels per inch....

most sony cameras are at 72 pixels per inch.
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Old Sep 13, 2003, 9:02 PM   #4
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I think that my big question is, Will I gain something, morever a 1 Mp, buying the oly 4000z ?, I've compared the datasheets for the canon A70 and the oly 4000z but I've not sight big differences between them.

So about manual controls and picture quality wich camera is better?

okwhatname: I didn't found the print quality data for the cameras that I'm considering, thanks any way.
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Old Sep 14, 2003, 12:13 AM   #5
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Print quality depends on the program settings, printer and size you print, not on the camera itself (unless you want to make some huge prints with a camera lacking in mp, then you're kind of stuck with poor ppi, but since you mentioned you only have a normal size printer (i'm assuming that means 8x10) both cameras should be fine). If you plan to print out up to 8x10s without cropping, then either camera will be fine. If you want to crop and still be able to make 8x10s, then go with the oly. My only problem with the oly is the lack of an af-assist lamp and the fact that it uses smartmedia memory cards which are stuck at 128mb.
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Old Sep 15, 2003, 1:26 AM   #6
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Hi! I've read a lot of reviews, and now I am more confused than before, in fact a new camera has appeared in scene, the minolta S414, now I'm considering 3 cameras, also I read a review about the canon A70 that said that this camera has a lot problems with noise, I saw some pictures with purple points, I didn't like it.

I like the minolta because use compact flash instead of smart media, but I don't know if it has less manual controls than the oly 4000z, and also I don't know anything about the image quality between the minolta and the oly.

I will apreciate any suggestion.
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Old Sep 15, 2003, 1:49 PM   #7
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Now, I'm not real familiar with the Minolta but, I did look at it also. It really seems like a pretty decent camera. So do the other two though. I personally haven't run into a lot of the "purple" & noise problems that others seem to have on their A70's. Perhaps I'm not as discerning as others?
My two problems with the A70 were it's size and, no AF illuminator. Supposedly, the Minolta has more shutter lag than other cameras in the same class but, I can't say first hand. It does have full manual controls like the other two cameras so, it's really a matter of preference

As far as th DPI debate goes, here's a link that explains it really well:

http://www.rideau-info.com/genealogy/digital/dpi.html

Mark
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Old Sep 15, 2003, 6:41 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by okwhatname
you should be concerned with print quality better known as pixels per inch (or cm).

to get good quality prints you should be looking for a camera that records @ at least 192 pixels per inch....

most sony cameras are at 72 pixels per inch.
Look at resolution of the image. That one camera records at 72 pixels per inch, and another at 192 pixels per inch is a common new user mistake.

You cannot go by what you are seeing in your image editing software. 72 ppi is the old standard for monitors -- that is all. Ignore it. It has nothing to do with the actual image size as recorded (2048x1532, 1600x1200, etc.)

The Sony Digital Cameras don't record the images any differently than the other digital camera of the same resolution. 72dpi is simply an old standard used for on screen viewing of images, and has nothing to do with the pixels per inch available for printing.

The Image Size in Pixels, divided by the Print Size In Inches, lets you know how many Pixels Per Inch you'll be sending to your printer driver.

The printer driver then converts this data, and prints at the select Dots Per Inch (as determined by the printer/driver combination).

Here's an example of showing that a 1500 x 1200 pixel image would be 300 pixels per inch at a print size of 5" x 4":

Width: 1500 pixels/ 5 inches = 300 pixels per inch
Height: 1200 pixels/4 inches = 300 pixels per inch

Many will argue that 150 pixels per inch is plenty of resolution, with anything more a waste, since the human eye won't be able to tell the difference at normal viewing distances.

Others will argue that 200, or even 300 pixels per inch is necessary for the best quality.

Here's a chart that may help. You'll probably find that the "good" column is all you need (unless you're going to examine the print under magnification). Anything less than the resolution in the good column, and your eyes will probably start detecting degradation at normal viewing distances:

http://www.cordcamera.com/products/d...ct_ratios.html

IMO, anything 150 or greater is fine.

Using the example of 192 pixels per inch to produce a good image ( given by okwhatname), a 1600 x 1200 pixel image from a Sony 2 Megapixel Camera would yield a print size of 8.33" x 6.25".

1600 pixels/192 pixels per inch = 8.33 inches
1200 pixels/192 pixels per inch = 6.25 inches

Here's another chart that takes popular digital camera image sizes, and shows how many pixels per inch you'll be sending to the printer driver for popular print sizes:

http://home.earthlink.net/~terryleed...tables.htm#ppi

Bottom Line: Ignore the 72dpi figure you see in your image editing software. It has nothing to do with the pixels available in the image for printing, and has nothing to do with the way the image is recorded (one digital camera records the pixels in the same way as another camera). The 72dpi you see is simply an old standard used for on screen viewing of the image.
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Old Sep 20, 2003, 6:07 AM   #9
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I own an Olympus C-4000z and can throughly recommend it. It's a fully featured manual - as well as haivng a P&S mode - and as far as I'm aware it's at least as fully featured as the A70.

Extra megapixels aren't everything, but all else being equal it's good to have more rather than less! Both the C-4000z and the A70 will produce fine 8 by 10 or A4 prints if that's the sort of output you're after.

With regards to the Olympus specifically, it's generally rated very high for picture quality. It's especially strong at macros. It's possibly not quite as user-friendly as some other cameras, but it's just a matter of getting used to it. For me, photo quality was paramount above all else, so that's why I chose it.

You can find plenty of photos on my site - all taken with the C-4000z. There's a special samples page with photos straight from the camera.

Best of luck with your purchase, whatever you choose!
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