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Old Sep 14, 2003, 7:10 PM   #1
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Default Filters (what filters for what purpose)

HI

I am thinking about what filters to buy in the 58mm size.

I am trying to deal with: 1) Glare and ultra bright light (outdoor city photography) 2) protect the lens at all times.

I was looking into the:
UV
Circular Polarizing
Neutral Density

What filters do you suggest for my needs?
What filters did you find most helpful?

David G.R.
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Old Sep 14, 2003, 7:19 PM   #2
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This post was posted in the PANASONIC forum july. No one answered it. I find the questions relevant, and am reposting it here.

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I'm thinking about buying some filters but there are so many different kinds so I can't decide. Can anyone show me a site where all these filters would really be well explained? I mean thousands of photos "with the x filter" and "without the filter".

I've already decided that a polarizer filter is a must and everyone is talking about an UV filter which is good to have permanently on. But others are talking about sky filters for the same purpose, which one is better to have, sky or UV?

Another thing which I can't get out of my mind is a thought, whether these filters can be replaced by a good software on my PC. I guess that polarize filters can't, but I would think that ND filters could be well enough replaced by software effects (apart from the fact that ND filters let you longer shutter time, of course). For instance, those "star" filters can surely be replaced by a PC?

Some more questions, please bear in mind I'm just a newbie.
1. Can I attach more filters on my camera and is that useful at all?
2. Can I use the same filters with TCON17 which I plan to buy and how?
3. About sizes - is there any difference if you use stepup/down rings?
4. Macro filters - well THAT's sth which really bothers me. What are these filters anyway? Why buying macro lenses if you can get a 10+ macro filter?! I'm sure this sounds really funny to most of guys here, but I really don't get it.

Just not to open a new topic - I'd like to take sport pictures, but fot that my shutter times have to be really short. Can you give me some hints how to achieve short times and how to take nice sport pictures?

Thanks for your help.

-----
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Old Sep 14, 2003, 10:32 PM   #3
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Default Re: Filters (what filters for what purpose)

Quote:
Originally Posted by David G.R.
I am trying to deal with: 1) Glare and ultra bright light (outdoor city photography) 2) protect the lens at all times. I was looking into the:
UV
Circular Polarizing
Neutral Density

What filters do you suggest for my needs?
What filters did you find most helpful?
Check the "Filters" section of my Coolpix 4500 user guide for more details. The most useful filter is certainly the polarizer. Linear and circular versions are both fine with digital cameras.

CK
http://www.cs.mtu.edu/~shene/DigiCam
Nikon Coolpix 950/990/995/2500/4500 User Guide
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Old Sep 15, 2003, 9:26 AM   #4
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do you not have to have a Circular Polarizing filter for most digital cams because of the autofocus system, which would get screwed up trying to AF through a linier pol. i dont know how the AF works through these filters but this is what i have seen when buying one for my camera
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Old Sep 15, 2003, 10:43 AM   #5
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Default Re: Filters (what filters for what purpose)

[quote="shene"] http://www.cs.mtu.edu/~shene/DigiCam

Hi CK
The link you sent me has practical resources for selecting filters and filter brands. How did you obtain the diffent brands, if its not a secret. :P

A number of folks at a different forum wanted such information.
The question was: "can an UV filter degrade photo quality?"
http://www.photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-...?msg_id=000QaA
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Old Sep 15, 2003, 10:52 AM   #6
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I would appreciate mandane terms to describe what the different filters do, as I am fuzzy on neutral density and polarizer functionalities.

What are the differences between the different UVs.
The three listed are by the same maker (Hoya) and same diameter (58mm)

A) Haze UV(0) (HMC) Multi-Coated Glass Filter
B) (S-HMC) Super Multi-Coated Glass Filter
C) Neutral (HMC) Multi-Coated Glass Filter - Ultra Thin

---

Jayson. Good note. I had similar questions at first. The manual for 717 says nightvision is not compatable with filters.
As for everything else, there is a small discussion in "sony" forum about it now.

All the best!

D.G.R.
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Old Sep 15, 2003, 1:08 PM   #7
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I'm no expert but perhaps this will help a little.
nd or neutral density filters block all colors of light equally. The effect is that they darken the exposure without altering color. If you are shooting in very bright light, and you are at your smallest apature, fastest shutter speed, and lowest iso, and the exposure is still to bright, this kind of filter will reduce the exposure. Also, even if you are not beyond the limits of your camera, you may want to use a slower shutter speed (to intentionally get motion blur) or may want to use a larger apature to get less depth of field. They are also usefull for this. All they do is darken the picture without changing color.
On the hoya filters listed, I think b is a beter quality filter than a. I am not sure what c is.
The diffrence between a uv haze filter and a skylight filter is that the uv/hase is not suposed to alter color. The skylight filter has a slight warming effect (gives a very slight red cast).
What I use a polerizer for is reduction of glare and reflections. When shooting in very bright sunlight, where there are reflections and glare off of things like car windows, lakes, snow (as well as many other things you wouldn't think would cause a lot of glare like plants), A polerizer will reduce the glare. It can also help with light reflecting off the camera lens, particularlly if you use teleconverters etc and mount the polerizer on the fornt of the converter. I know there are other uses for them like getting deeper blue skys, effects with clouds etc., but that goes beyond my knoledge of it.
Linear polerizers work fine with most prosumer digital cameras. They will not work with dslr's that have flip up mirrors. I have heard of them causing problems with the auto exposure of some non slr cameras but I cnnot tell you which. I can tell you that linear is suposed to be fine with canon cameras (a, s and g series).
As far as the 717 not being able to use filters in night mode, I have to wonder if they say this because in night mode, the camera moves the internal infrared cut filter out of the way. If you use an infrared filter that only allows ir to pass (blocks visable light) and a nd filter if nessasary, and shoot in daylight, you might just be able to see through peoples clothes lol! Actually this doesn't work very well (or so I'm told). The only fabrics that become transparent are verylight weight fabrics that are almost transparent to start with. You cannot see through most clothing. Still, they don't want you trying it at the beach (thin fabric swim suits).
Here is usage of this camera with an ir filter/nd filter in night mode (real photography, not naked people), so aparentlly you can use some filters.
http://www.stecf.org/~rfosbury/home/...maging_ir.html
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Old Sep 15, 2003, 10:59 PM   #8
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what do you guys think of the Ritz's brand "Quantaray" filters, particularly the
58mm DMC-UV Multi Coated, their polarizer and the neutral density filters.

Richard, thank you for your post.
-David
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Old Sep 16, 2003, 3:18 AM   #9
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Default Re: Filters (what filters for what purpose)

Hi David,

Quote:
Originally Posted by David G.R.
How did you obtain the diffent brands, if its not a secret. :P
I have been playing with SLR, 645 and 6x6 cameras for two decades for professional and personal work. Those filters were collected throughout the years. So, there is no secret at all.


Quote:
Originally Posted by David G.R.
The question was: "can an UV filter degrade photo quality?"
There is no unique answer to this question. Theoretically, any added glass to a lens will somewhat reduce the image quality even though the filter glass is perfectly made. The major reason is internal reflection and light loss. Good and expansive ones are multi-coated to reduce reflection and increase light transmission, producing a better image quality. There are two types of UV filters: the commonly seen one and the one to be used in higher elevation. Today's camera lenses are most made from good glass. Since glass can absorb UV ray, which is exactly the purpose of a UV filter, a UV filter is in general not needed. Moreover, adding a UV filter will reduce optical quality of the whole system. On the other hand, another school of thought insists that adding a UV filter will increase the protection of the camera lens, which is also true. I personally never use a UV filter on any of my lenses. However, if you do feel the need of a UV, buy a good one, especially a multicoated one. Avoid the use of those plain glass "protection" filter. With a poorly made UV filter, you will get more trouble than its benefits (e.g., ghost and flare). The "Lens Overview" page in "On-Camera Lens" section of my Coolpix 4500 user guide shows the results of using a poorly made filter.

In summary, the answer to your question are: YES, a UV filter can degrade image quality if the one being used is not a good one, and NO, a good UV filter will not degrade image quality to a noticeable level.

CK
http://www.cs.mtu.edu/~shene/DigiCam
Nikon Coolpix 950/990/995/2500/4500 User Guide
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Old Sep 19, 2003, 4:38 PM   #10
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Default Filters & such

I use the Quantaray multicoated filters (& it's buy 2 get one free at Wolf/Ritz right now) and can not tell the difference in them or Tiffen.

Also, I believe that most neutral density filters are half & half (or maybe they are called gradient neutral density). As in, one half is neutral density & the other is clear. Great for shooting landscapes if the sky is white/hazy & your zoom doesn't turn your lens.
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