Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Newbie Help

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 19, 2008, 12:56 PM   #1
PB3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 12
Default

Hi,

I just purchased Sony DSC-H50 not to long ago. I have been exploring its funtions for the past week but being that I have never had a camera with so many capabilities Im completely lost! So i have some questions and hoping you guys had some answers or suggestions.

1.) When I am increasing the shutter speed on the "S"mode,why does the picture seem to be getting darker? I also noticed that in high light there seems to be a bright line that apears on the picture when increasing the speed.

-I was attemping to take a picture of my dog playing in the sprinkler but didnt want the water to seem like a continuous flow. I wanted the water and my dog to be frozen in the moment.

2.) I know there is a mode on the camera where if I wanted to take a picture of an object, I could have it completely focused on with the entire background out of focus. I think the indicator on the dail has a little man thats white and the one in back is just outline in white with dark on the inside. If the camera is in this mode will it do everything needed or should I take certain outside parameters into consideration? Any settings that I would need to be watching for? Can this function also be preformed in high action(sport games..below link)shots?

http://msn.foxsports.com/nba/pgStory...;photo=8257572





3.) I want to invest in a telephoto lens and wide angle lens in the near future.I know both of these dont do alot, but if you had to suggest one to be purchased first, which one?

I know these are probably dumb questions but any answers would be greatful!

Thanks!

Pete

PB3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jun 19, 2008, 8:28 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
BillDrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hay River Township, WI
Posts: 2,512
Default

PB3 wrote:
Quote:
I just purchased Sony DSC-H50 not to long ago. I have been exploring its funtions for the past week but being that I have never had a camera with so many capabilities Im completely lost! ...
I don't know that camera and would suggest that you ask in the Sony forum for specific things.

A digital camera is more like a computer than it is like a chemical camera so it will be confussing at first - there is a lot to figure out. One thing that will help is an EXIF viewer - likely one came with the software that came with the camera. The EXIF data will tell you what f/stop, shutter speed, ISO, mode, ... were used for each photo. Much easier than making notes on paper and matching them to a negative/slide/print.

Do a bit of reading to figure out the relationship between shutter speed, f/stop, and ISO. One basic point is that you need a lot of light reaching the sensor (large aperature or low f/number) or/and a lot of amplification (high ISO) to be able to use a high shutter speed. Likely the problem you outlined in your first point. Those issues are the same as a chemical camera.
BillDrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 19, 2008, 10:13 PM   #3
PB3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 12
Default

Hi Bill,

Thanks for the feedback!

I have done some research but like you mentioned things are still scrambled up when it comes to the vocabulary of digital cameras.

When you mention f/stop, what exactly is that? I have seen the word around in forum but have yet to see it explained.



Thanks!
PB3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 20, 2008, 7:51 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
BillDrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hay River Township, WI
Posts: 2,512
Default

PB3 wrote:
Quote:
...
When you mention f/stop, what exactly is that? I have seen the word around in forum but have yet to see it explained.
...
I think you will find an explaination if you continue to look - browsing about in the forums is a good way to pick up various stuff.

f/stop is a measure of the lens aperature - how open the irus is. How much light is let through the lens. It is the ratio of focal length to diameter of the aperature so the lower the number, the more open the lens is.

Since the amount of light let through the lens is proportional to the area of the aperature opening while the f/stop is a measure of the diameter, doubling the f/stop cuts the amount of light by a factor of four.

"stop" is often used to refer to a change in either shutter speed or ISO, e.g., "increase the ISO by a couple of stops", or "the exposure was off by one stop". In that context one stop is a factor of two in exposure which is a factor of two in either shutter speed or in ISO while it is a factor of the square root of two in f/stop (remember the difference between area and diameter).
BillDrew is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:21 PM.