Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Newbie Help

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Oct 23, 2008, 9:39 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
VTphotog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Extreme Northeastern Vermont, USA
Posts: 4,234
Default

I wouldn't call it a dupe, exactly, but it is a nice way for the salesman to make a few extra bucks, especially if the customer is new to cameras, and worried about making mistakes.

There are cases where I would use a protective filter, such as for trackside motorsports, courtside beach volleyball. or shooting from a moving boat, esp. on salt water. Basically, any activity which is putting a lot of grit and/or wet into the air. Other than that, I find that a lens hood, and awareness of where my camera is, is sufficient to protect my lenses.

brian
VTphotog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 23, 2008, 9:50 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Boldstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 241
Default

VTphotog wrote:
Quote:
I wouldn't call it a dupe, exactly, but it is a nice way for the salesman to make a few extra bucks, especially if the customer is new to cameras, and worried about making mistakes.

There are cases where I would use a protective filter, such as for trackside motorsports, courtside beach volleyball. or shooting from a moving boat, esp. on salt water. Basically, any activity which is putting a lot of grit and/or wet into the air. Other than that, I find that a lens hood, and awareness of where my camera is, is sufficient to protect my lenses.

brian
I completely understand. And I'll keep my crappy Optex UV filter for the odd occasion where I'm in the fishing boat with pals, trying to grab shots at the snowmobile race and on the beach when I'm photographing swimsuit models (in my dreams). Otherwise I think I'll try to live without it.


Boldstar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 24, 2008, 10:12 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
BillDrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hay River Township, WI
Posts: 2,512
Default

I'd like to emphasize the point made by John and Brian: a lens hood will offer some protection to your lens. Not only will it keep direct light hitting your lens from the side, it will also keep twigs/rocks/small elfs/... from hitting the lens.
BillDrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 24, 2008, 9:40 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
VTphotog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Extreme Northeastern Vermont, USA
Posts: 4,234
Default

BillDrew wrote:
Quote:
I'd like to emphasize the point made by John and Brian: a lens hood will offer some protection to your lens. Not only will it keep direct light hitting your lens from the side, it will also keep twigs/rocks/small elfs/... from hitting the lens.
- And the prongs on the petal-shaped hoods are really great for prodding bystanders out of the way.:evil:

brian
VTphotog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 25, 2008, 8:27 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
dr_spock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 879
Default

I think it would depend on your situation whether to leave them on or take them off. I leave mine on all the time since my kids like to shove their little hands into my lens when I try to take their pictures.
dr_spock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 27, 2008, 10:42 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
terry@softreq.com's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 2,539
Default

Most pro's I know do not use a lens filter.

They simply take care of their lenses.

As JimC suggested, if your very concerned you could probably get by with a lens hood that would protect against day to day bangs and scratches.
terry@softreq.com is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 2:19 AM.