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Old Dec 26, 2008, 8:26 AM   #1
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I have a Panasonic Luminx FS5. I have had it for awhile and I am not getting the performance that I really want. When it takes good pictures, it is great...I really like how the colors are natural. But the problem is consistancy. Most of the time 1 out of 10 shots will be good, and the rest will be bad...mainly ether incorrect lighting or blurry. This is all on the same settings(ISO 800).

These photo's(all of them) are in the living room of my cousins house.

Here are the shots with the in consistancy in lighting. The location in the top is a little bit different from the bottom two, but close enough to where I should be getting the same or about the same lighting. And the bottom are the same location...two snapshots in a row but lighting is diff.:




Here's another photo that seems to have bad lighting:


And with this photo, it seems to be a little blury for the two people who were not really moving(but with stablizer on)...but I didn't take this one(since I'm in it) so maybe the person taking it didn't focus it long enough:



BUT here's a photo that came out good(good lighting, good detail) even though still a tad bit blurry. I can't get most photos to come out this good...like I said...not alot of consistancy:




Why is the lighting in consistant in the top three photos?

I am at a crossroads. I don't mind selling this camera and paying the difference and getting a better one because qaulity is important for me. But I'm not a professional photographer, so I want to stay with a point and shoot(I would spend up to $400.00...maybe even up to $500.00). I would like to be able to get conistant good qaulity pictures(good lighting and be able to capture movement better without bluryness(simply a head moving) instead of 1 out of 10 shots(if I'm lucky), and a more speedier shutter time because I often miss the moment.
I thought about getting:
http://www.amazon.com/Panasonic-DMC-.../ref=de_a_smtd

Would this be a significant improvement from the one I have now(1/1.63" CCD versus 1/2.33" CCD)? Would there be consistancy in the lighting?


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Old Dec 26, 2008, 9:50 AM   #2
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All of the photos you posted, except the last one, have a strong backlight, and are shot with the Pattern metering mode. This "Measures the light at points across the entire image to achieve a balanced exposure setting", but since the light from the windows in the background consititute a major source of light, the rest of the image (including the subject) is quite dark. The Panasonic FS5 has a 'Backlight Compensation', but only in the 'Intelligent AUTO'Shooting mode. If you're not using the 'Intelligent AUTO'Shooting mode, perhaps you should try, and if you are, perhaps it isn't compensating enough and you should try to avoid strong backlight situations.

I notice that you're using a high ISO setting (400-800), and that could be making the situation worse. But I also notice that you're using large apertures (relatively speaking) and slow shutter speeds. Maybe you should use the flash. This will get you faster shutter speeds and better lighting for the foreground subjects.
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Old Dec 27, 2008, 1:01 AM   #3
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I tried the flash but it always makes the picture look unnatural. With the flash on, the colors are very off from the original colors and the picture doesn't look right at all. With the flash off, the picture looks more natural. I choose the 800 ISO because I noticed when inside it makes the picutre brighter and shows more detail. With a low ISO I loose alot of detail.

I assume I adjust the aperature with the ISO, correct? How do Iadjust the shutter speed?

Also,the second and third picture from the tophave the same setting, same location, and take very close together. Why is thethird one brighter(what I prefer) than the second one?


Thanks,

-Darin





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Old Dec 27, 2008, 10:29 AM   #4
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dman777 wrote:
Quote:
I tried the flash but it always makes the picture look unnatural. With the flash on, the colors are very off from the original colors and the picture doesn't look right at all. With the flash off, the picture looks more natural. I choose the 800 ISO because I noticed when inside it makes the picutre brighter and shows more detail. With a low ISO I loose alot of detail.
Yes, a higher ISO setting would compensate for lower levels of light, but would also increase the level of image noise.

dman777 wrote:
Quote:
I assume I adjust the aperature with the ISO, correct? How do Iadjust the shutter speed?
The FS5 doesn't have a manual exposure mode, andit wouldn't help you even if it did.A properly exposed image results froma combination of Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO Setting. You set the ISO to 800,and your camera selects the aperture and shutter speed. If you were to select a lower ISO setting,your camera would just select a slower shutter speed.

dman777 wrote:
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Also,the second and third picture from the tophave the same setting, same location, and take very close together. Why is thethird one brighter(what I prefer) than the second one?
Your camera has metering points that measure the amount of light, and selects the exposure settings based on those measurements.The second and third images both have a very strong backlight from the window. It's possible that, from one shot to the next, a cloud came by and reduced the amount of light slightly,so the resulting exposure settingswere better for the subject. It'salso possible that inthe second shot, 2 of the metering pointswere measuring thelight from the window, butin the third shot only1 metering point was affected.

What screwed up your images is the backlight. Why one was affected more thananother is hard to say. Your camera has a 'Backlight Compensation', but it only works in the 'Intelligent AUTO'Shooting mode. Considering the results you're getting, you should use the 'Intelligent AUTO'Shooting mode, if you aren't already. And under any circumstances, you should avoid taking photos with a strong backlight. There aren't a lot of cameras that would do much better under those circumstances.
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Old Jan 2, 2009, 5:28 PM   #5
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Try getting an external flash - one that swivels.

If you "bounce" the flash off the ceiling you'll get some nice shots!

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