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Old Dec 30, 2008, 11:12 PM   #21
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DarkDTSHD wrote:
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I don't know what it is.
You may use one of this translucent panel: http://www.adorama.com/POC42.html?se...&item_no=9

-> To shade your flower
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Old Dec 31, 2008, 2:29 AM   #22
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NHL wrote:
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DarkDTSHD wrote:
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I don't know what it is.
You may use one of this translucent panel: http://www.adorama.com/POC42.html?se...ctor&item_no=9

-> To shade your flower
That is another possible solution. Problem is the white rose flower arrangement /vase is sitting on a black file cabinet that is pretty much butt up against the wall in the corner. At the upper half of this corner are two large windows about 3ft by 4ft each. And about a foot and a half from the cabinet is a bed. If the roses were maybe 3 feet into the room then yes...I think the shades would be a great idea.

Incidentally, I was looking to buy a few of those discs for portrait work any how. So I bookmarked the link. And that 5-in-1 kit is backordered. But thanks for the recommendation.

When I set my D300 to RAW should I bother with 14-bit? Have you tried comparing it to shots done in 12-bit? Or any other D300/D700/D3 owner in this forum.
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Old Dec 31, 2008, 8:03 AM   #23
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In shooting 14 bit vs 12 bit, the answer to your question is maybe, and dependent somewhat on your converter. Thom Hogan explains it more in his D300 review, http://www.bythom.com/nikond300review.htm.

I've recently tried shooting some in 14 bit and doing the initial conversion with Capture. I haven't really noticed a difference, and am still struggling with using Capture (I have always used Photoshop for my Raw conversions). I have been able to recover some detail from blown highlights, but I typically expose for the highlights and don't blow that many. This does create some noise in shadows, but noise reduction software cleans this up pretty good. It is a lot easier to pull details out of underexposed shadows than blown highlights.
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Old Dec 31, 2008, 8:15 AM   #24
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DarkDTSHD wrote:
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Hello JohnG,

I don't think I understand what you meant when you said there is no exposure comp while in M mode on my D300. You can dial in some under- or overexposure..

As I mentioned in my earlier post - the concept of Exposure Compensation is as follows: you are telling the camera to determine it's own exposure and essentially saying - whatever that exposure is, automatically bump it up by +1 (assuming +1 EC). Set your camera in AV mode and dial in +1 EC. Now point the camera at 5 different subjects and half-press the shutter. Notice the exposure values the camera would use (NOT the exposure scale, but the shutter speed, ISO and aperture values). Likely 5 different results. The exposureSCALE will always show +1.

Now, put the camera in Manual and point it at the first subject. Change the aperture or shutter (whichever gets changed by the dial you think is performing EC) until the meter shows +1. Note what the shutter, aperture and ISO values are. Now point the camera at the other 4 subjects and half press the shutter. You'll notice the shutter speed, ISO and aperture remain the SAME. BUT you should see the value on the exposure SCALE will change. That is because you are no longer using exposure compensation. You are setting the camera to a specific exposure. Two different concepts.

I can understand if you had the camera just pointed at a single subject why moving the dial in Manual mode would seem like using exposure compensation - you change the dial and you see the value on the exposure scale move up or down. BUT in manual the camera's metering doesn't affect the shot at all. It isn't doing the metering. The only thing the camera is contributing is that scale value. But ISO, aperture and shutter speed are the only variables in exposure and you the photographer have told the camera which 3 values to use. So the camera is not exposing the shot. YOU are. The exercise of moving the camera around to acquire different subjects when using manual vs. other modes with EC should illustrate the practical difference of the two.

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Old Dec 31, 2008, 11:18 AM   #25
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Hello JohnG,

Thanks for the explaination. Got it. But why is it then that while in M mode you can still dial in Exposure Comp (pressing the exp comp button and the main control dial)? I do notice a difference in exposure. Should the exposure comp be set to zero when in M? This is why I thought there was exposure comp while in M mode.
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Old Dec 31, 2008, 11:20 AM   #26
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JohnG

With the D300 (and Nikon dSLR in general) you can set EC in the manual mode when you're in Auto ISO... I use this feature with a -.7 EC and do a 3 brackets set with -1, 0, +1EV

i.e. the camera can be in automatic mode this way in M (and put the limit on the ISO range)
-> Effectively I'm getting -1.7, -.7, and +.3EV bracket
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Old Dec 31, 2008, 11:31 AM   #27
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DarkDTSHD wrote:
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That is another possible solution. Problem is the white rose flower arrangement /vase is sitting on a black file cabinet that is pretty much butt up against the wall in the corner. At the upper half of this corner are two large windows about 3ft by 4ft each. And about a foot and a half from the cabinet is a bed. If the roses were maybe 3 feet into the room then yes...I think the shades would be a great idea.
No problem here...

Instead of decreasing the light with the "shade", you can increase the light by using the reflector cover instead from the windows light onto your black file cabinet instead!
-> Both have the same effect of reducing the dynamic range to fit your camera profile:
1. The shade works like an ND to reduce the bright areas
2. The reflector works like a flash to boost up the dark areas
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Old Dec 31, 2008, 11:40 AM   #28
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NHL wrote:
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JohnG

With the D300 (and Nikon dSLR in general) you can set EC in the manual when you're in Auto ISO mode... I use this feature with a -.7 EC and do a 3 brackets set with -1, 0, +1EV

-> i.e. the camera can be in automatic mode this way in M (and put the limit on the ISO range)
No wonder I could dial in EC when in M mode. I have Auto ISO on.

But when bracketing why would you still be using EC? Assuming you're in any of the 4 shooting modes. I would have thought the EC would be set to 0 (obviously I have not tried the auto bracketing feature).

And, would we get a better result using JohnG's method while in M mode. That is to turn off the Auto ISO and dial in the exposure values (ISO, Av and Tv) till the exposure scale reads +1 (or what ever the value you want). Seems this would cost you more time since you are now adjusting the Av/Tv till you get the desired exposure value on the scale. Though if the subject is stationary this won't matter.
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Old Dec 31, 2008, 12:12 PM   #29
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Thanks NHL for clearing up the confusion between us. Manual mode with auto ISO then simply works like AV or TV mode in cameras w/o auto ISO? I.E. the user is locking in 2 parameters and the camera adjusts the third? I had incorrectly assumed in manual exposure auto-ISO was turned off. The draw-back of not having hands-on experience.

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And, would we get a better result using JohnG's method while in M mode. That is to turn off the Auto ISO and dial in the exposure values (ISO, Av and Tv) till the exposure scale reads +1 (or what ever the value you want). Seems this would cost you more time since you are now adjusting the Av/Tv till you get the desired exposure value on the scale.
Not sure I understand. Even with auto ISO turned on you still have to select a shutter speed and aperture value. You are then using a dial to adjust ISO. If auto ISO is turned off, you would instead be using a dial to adjust either aperture or shutter. In the end you end up adjusting only a single parameter UNLESS you hit some personal threshold. For instance you may choose to adjust shutter speed but you may get to a point where you are concerned about motion blur or camera shake so you may have to then make an adjustment to one of the other 2 parameters.

But in any case, in manual exposure you have to dial in an aperture value and a shutter speed. It appears Nikon allows you to either dial in the ISO or allow the camera to select an ISO value. Which again means you're letting the camera determine exposure.






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Old Dec 31, 2008, 3:17 PM   #30
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DarkDTSHD wrote:
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But when bracketing why would you still be using EC? Assuming you're in any of the 4 shooting modes. I would have thought the EC would be set to 0 (obviously I have not tried the auto bracketing feature).
Because like you I may be shooting a white bird... (i.e. 0 may not be the correct value)
If I had set my camera on 0 then @ 0EC the resulting image would have been overexposed and +1EC would be even 1-stop worse overexposed and -1EC may end up the only shot that could be useable!

-> I intentionally moved my entire bracketing sequence darker by -.7EV making it center on my (bright) white subject then if I goofed I can then used my +0.3EC image to recover the detail in the shadow areas (or extract more headroom from the overblown area by using the -1.7EC image) with HDR...
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