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Old Oct 29, 2003, 7:59 PM   #1
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Default Oh, Beautiful for Purple Skies (and Lakes) ?

I have a Fuji FinePix 2400 (?) and have tried 3 different printing services: Costco, Shutterfly, Ofoto. In all 3, rich blues (like skies and lakes) have a purple tint. The photos have not been modified by me, but are downloaded from the memory card and sent to the printing service. Is this a characteristic of the imaging sensor in my camera, and is there anything I can do about it? The problem is really noticeable when I compare digital prints to prints made from film of the same scene at the same time.
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Old Oct 29, 2003, 9:54 PM   #2
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Mike, most digicams have a bias toward one color or another. My Canon over emphasizes blue, so when I run my pics through color enhancements, the first thing I do is test blue reduction in gamma.

You need to hunt around the net for unbiased info on how your camera interprets certain colors.

Wish I could be of further help.
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Old Oct 29, 2003, 11:09 PM   #3
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One of the dirty little secrets they don't tell you about digital cameras is YOU have to play the role of the darkroom technician. You can colour correct in programs like Photosharp, and most digital pictures can use a little sharpening.

Digital cameras aren't perfect, there's adjustable white balance which helps with those cameras that need to be told in what lighting environment they're shooting in.
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Old Oct 30, 2003, 7:09 AM   #4
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You could look very carefully at the rgb numeric values which are returned in a photo editor on 'white' areas. Since white needs definition in the true precision of things, cloudy northerly sky reflected off a card could be a start. I say look at the values,because then you eliminate monitor errors.

These values will tell you something about how the camera is white balancing. If each value is 100% then that's white for a monitor, if one or two colours are consistently different, try a post white balance in editing and re-check the values.

Once you know where the error is and if it's consistent, you can either try colour balance pre-sets in the camera, or if it hasn't got this, set up a batch mode correction as suggested. Don't forget, printing to a halide paper will introduce more variables. But these should be less to do with colour casts, and more to do with colour saturation which may come with a particular brand of paper stock.

On landscape shots, I've been thinking for a while that digicam sensors are sensitive to invisible UV which might modify the colour balance arithmetic - but I haven't tried a filter and proved it yet. VOX
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Old Oct 30, 2003, 7:36 PM   #5
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Print your own on an HP deskjet on their paper and the print
will outlast you in an acid-free sleeve

Just a thought!
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Old Oct 30, 2003, 11:53 PM   #6
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Quote:
Print your own on an HP deskjet
Actually, I have an HP 932, but thought it would be cheaper and easier to pay 19-29 cents/print to have it done "professionally". Just for kicks today, I went up into the mountains east of Seattle and took a few pictures of the dusting of snow. I experimented with the white balance settings (turns out AUTO is the best). Then I printed a few 4x6 on Canon (free sample :roll: ) glossy and a couple on cheap coated inkjet paper. I was impressed by the results, even on the coated paper. One photo had noticeable bluing which I haven't figured out how to remove in Photoshop Elements. This was a picture of white clouds, blue sky, gray cliffs, and snow. I tried a few different "Color Casts" in Elements, but couldn't get it right.

The 932 "small media" paper slot also roughed up the glossy surface quite a bit. I wonder, do the newer printers have even better color? I don't see how it could get much better.

Thanks to all.


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Old Oct 31, 2003, 7:25 AM   #7
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The 'professional' prints on photo halide paper are likely to last a generation or more unless you've researched archival ink properties.

Put your wedding pics on ink paper, move to a future incompatible PC file format, and I doubt your prints will look up to much in 40 years time, unless kept in the dark in a sealed container surrounded by an inert gas under positive pressure! VOX
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Old Oct 31, 2003, 11:30 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeeve


I wonder, do the newer printers have even better color? I don't see how it could get much better.
I have the same HP printer you have and use it as my general purpose printer. It doesn’t hold a candle to my dedicated photo inkjet with 6 ink colors and much better resolution.

I agree it is easier and cheaper to have large numbers of 4 X 6 prints done at a place like Wal-Mart or Walgrens with Fuji processors. Home printing is for special shots IMO. You can sort, crop and edit the images before dropping them off at the photofinishers.

One advantage of digital is that it is easy to reprint anything that fades. Someone selling photos should stick with pigmented inks like used in the Epson 2200. But the Canon photo printers are faster, much more frugal with ink and a snap to refill.
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Old Oct 31, 2003, 6:32 PM   #9
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maybe i missed something here but would another option not be a circular polarized filter? that way your camera will make the blue skies and clouds jump out at ya.....then print from there
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Old Oct 31, 2003, 9:08 PM   #10
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Quote:
would another option not be a circular polarized filter?
Unfortunately, not for my Fuji Finepix. It's not designed to accept filters.
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