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Old Jan 17, 2010, 9:06 AM   #11
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I just looked at the Instruction Manual for the T1i, and think the A-DEP (page 82) is interesting and useful, though I don't know how often I'd use it myself.

In A-DEP (Auto-Depth of field) Mode, the T1i scans all the focus points, and determines the focusing distance for the subject, and the aperture necessary to keep the entire scene within the depth of field.

I think this is an interesting and useful addition to the common AUTO Mode, but it's not a substitute for Av Mode and shouldn't be mistaken for one.
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Old Jan 17, 2010, 11:08 AM   #12
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I just looked at the Instruction Manual for the T1i, and think the A-DEP (page 82) is interesting and useful, though I don't know how often I'd use it myself.

In A-DEP (Auto-Depth of field) Mode, the T1i scans all the focus points, and determines the focusing distance for the subject, and the aperture necessary to keep the entire scene within the depth of field.

I think this is an interesting and useful addition to the common AUTO Mode, but it's not a substitute for Av Mode and shouldn't be mistaken for one.
Thanks for the reading and the report. The OP wheted my curiosity. Hmm, an auto mode that tries to optimise DOF. That's a new one on me, and while I probably wouldn't use it much, it sure sounds useful. Certainly I prefer manual, but I would definitily give it a try.

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Old Jan 17, 2010, 7:06 PM   #13
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I've played with it for a bit and definitely think Av mode is where I'll be most often. However, I guess i still have a question though. When using full manual, you use the exposure meter to tell you if you need to adjust your settings to get the exposure right. In Av mode, since I'm only controlling the aperture, and the camera controls everything else, the exposure meter is always at +/-0. How do you tell if a shot's exposure is correct without taking it and looking at it afterwards. Surely, there's more to Av mode than just controlling the DoF, right? Maybe I'm just expecting there to be more to an "advanced" mode. Like JimC said in another post, I'm "probably making it more difficult than it is."
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Old Jan 17, 2010, 7:10 PM   #14
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even in AV mode you can adjust exposure with exposure compensation feature.
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Old Jan 17, 2010, 7:25 PM   #15
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Yes. Av allows you to adjust the aperture, and the camera compensates for your selecton by adjusting the shutter speed. Similarly, in Tv mode, you adjust the shutter speed, and the camera compensates for your selecton by adjusting the aperture. The camera makes the necessary adjustments to obtain a proper exposure whatever settings you choose (within reason.) That's why it's called Auto Exposure.

The Exposure Compensation allows you to adjust the exposure to taste, but you don't have to do that if you don't want to.
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Old Jan 17, 2010, 7:28 PM   #16
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hold the the +/- button and scroll the wheel is one way if you are doing a single shot. Or if you go to the menu and choose the exposure comp. You can do a bracket shot of 3, you can have it one at normal exposure, one underexposed, and one over expose by selecting with the wheel. You can choose to have them all over or under expose after choosing how many 1/3 you want to be the different between the shots, then use the left or right keys to move the bracket to the over or under expose side.

PS

If you choose to do the bracket of 3 you will need to put you camera into continuous shooting mode first.
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Old Jan 17, 2010, 8:39 PM   #17
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The question opens a useful "can of worms." It's one of the main reasons I shoot manual. Metering mode also comes into question. I'm not a big fan of exposure compensation, although I use it from time to time.

But when we point our cameras at the target, what is being metered? That big light area, or the big dark area? Meanwhile we want the little guy in the corner to be the subject of the photograph. After shooting manual for years, I know when I have to compensate for the meter.

It's also the main reason why many photographers carry around an accessory light meter, to find the effects of ambient light.

This is really a very big subject. Perhaps it deserves a sticky thread?

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Old Jan 17, 2010, 9:10 PM   #18
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Besides setting white balance, that's another use for a Gray Card. Switch to manual exposure, set the exposure for the 18% gray card, and leave it there. If the lighting conditions don't change, you should be good.
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Old Jan 17, 2010, 9:23 PM   #19
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That bring up another interesting question. Gray card or White card for custom white balance?
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Old Jan 17, 2010, 9:45 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chato View Post
The question opens a useful "can of worms." It's one of the main reasons I shoot manual. Metering mode also comes into question. I'm not a big fan of exposure compensation, although I use it from time to time.

But when we point our cameras at the target, what is being metered? That big light area, or the big dark area? Meanwhile we want the little guy in the corner to be the subject of the photograph. After shooting manual for years, I know when I have to compensate for the meter.
Dave
A lot depends on which mode you have set your metering to. There are three basic modes, as I'm sure you are aware: Matrix or multisegment metering analyzes all of the metering points, and makes a judgement of exposure depending on camera software, and sometimes,user input. (there may be settings for preventing blown highlights, etc.)
Centerweighted average metering also takes into account all metering segments, but gives more priority to the center point (or area). This allows more accurate exposure of the center of the frame where most of us want it in most cases.
Center point or spot metering looks at only the center (or selected spot) of the frame and determines best exposure of this point, ignoring shadows and highlights in the rest of the frame. Useful when a subject is backlighted, and you need a face, for example, to be properly exposed. If your camera allows, you can change the spot to the corner where the little guy you want the picture of is.

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