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Old Feb 14, 2010, 5:53 PM   #21
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It depends on what you need the filter to do. UV is ultraviolet - for film it helps with contrast on bright, overcast days. Digital sensors are less sensitive to UV, so they are often used for lens protection, as are the clear filters made just for lens protection.

ND is neutral density. They come in different shades of gray, to reduce the amount of light entering the lens. Useful to be able to use larger apertures/slower shutter when there is a lot of light. Also GND - graduated neutral density, to even out bright sky/darker land for landscape shots.

Polarizer. LIke polarized sunglasses for your camera. Increases contrast and gets rid of haze and some reflections. Come in two variations - linear and circular.

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Originally Posted by littlejohn View Post
I am beginning to like the idea of a filter as well...but not sure what I should get...UV...ND..or polorizer...

Just because I can drop names, doesn't mean I know what in hell each is used for

all help appreciated...
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Old Feb 14, 2010, 5:55 PM   #22
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I use a Hama UV filter on my FZ35 and see no difference with or without it, as long as the filter is crystal clear & clean @ all times.
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Old Feb 15, 2010, 1:04 AM   #23
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aladyforty-

Welcome back. It is good to see you posting again. We have missed you.

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I have not been away, just lurking LOL
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Old Feb 15, 2010, 1:08 AM   #24
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I use hoya UV filters, that's all, anything else I don't bother with, photo-shop can do anything else filter wise. I can honestly say that for daylight photography I see no difference in quality. I take them off for weddings just in case I have to shoot in really low light, night time where there are city lights etc, I notice a glare caused by the filters so take them off
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Old Feb 15, 2010, 10:21 AM   #25
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I use hoya UV filters, that's all, anything else I don't bother with, photo-shop can do anything else filter wise. I can honestly say that for daylight photography I see no difference in quality. I take them off for weddings just in case I have to shoot in really low light, night time where there are city lights etc, I notice a glare caused by the filters so take them off
Photoshop cannot compete with a polarizing filter, anymore than it can restore blown highlights... A graduated ND filter also has some effects that Photoshop cannot replace... A polarizer would have marvelous effects on your photography - Give it a shot... Dave
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Old Feb 16, 2010, 10:17 AM   #26
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Photoshop cannot compete with a polarizing filter, anymore than it can restore blown highlights... A graduated ND filter also has some effects that Photoshop cannot replace... A polarizer would have marvelous effects on your photography - Give it a shot... Dave
Have used one but find I really have no need for it, Im not opposed to using one, just have not really bothered, the last time I used one it made the sky just way too blue and I was not impressed by the effect, but I did like the way it could make the colors very rich in a landscape
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Old Feb 16, 2010, 4:30 PM   #27
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Have used one but find I really have no need for it, Im not opposed to using one, just have not really bothered, the last time I used one it made the sky just way too blue and I was not impressed by the effect, but I did like the way it could make the colors very rich in a landscape
People buy them for the saturated effect they can produce - But that is something that Photoshop CAN duplicate. What it cannot duplicate is the elimination of glare and refraction. Photoshop cannot eliminate glare once it's in the image. Good polarizers have the ability to turn the filter and cut down the polarization from full to zero. Dave
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Old Feb 16, 2010, 8:11 PM   #28
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Perhaps Photoshop can't do it, but there are programs which can.
http://forums.steves-digicams.com/hd...ml#post1052235

Rotating a polarizer changes the angle of polarity of the light being allowed to pass the filter, but does not change the amount of polarization, or the amount of light blocked. That can be done by stacking polarizers, though.

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Old Feb 17, 2010, 7:29 PM   #29
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Perhaps Photoshop can't do it, but there are programs which can.
http://forums.steves-digicams.com/hd...ml#post1052235

Rotating a polarizer changes the angle of polarity of the light being allowed to pass the filter, but does not change the amount of polarization, or the amount of light blocked. That can be done by stacking polarizers, though.

brian
No program can duplicate the reduction in glare that it does. Period. There is more to the discussion of these filters than I'm prepared to spend. It's one of the few filters that are extemely useful with digital cameras and image processing programs...

Filter options for digital cameras

Dave

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Old Feb 17, 2010, 7:39 PM   #30
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Here is one argument for ND and polarizer filters. If you do not like pp work. And know how to use these filters, they save some time on the computer. And for me it is more fun to shoot then edit
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