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Old Jan 16, 2010, 4:04 PM   #11
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Jim,

Got a chance to play around and take some test shots. Prior to this post, I knew what the different exposure controls did in principle only. For example, I knew that I needed to change the shutter speed to compensate for increased or decreased ISO. I even knew which direction the change had to be made, however, I had no clue how much.

With your information, I've been able to get them perfectly exposed (according to the camera's meter). Your patience and information is much appreciated. Now if I could only get my 9 month old to sit still long enough, or get my hands to move faster so I can make the changes quick enough, I'll be in good shape.
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Old Jan 17, 2010, 7:29 AM   #12
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You're probably making it harder than it needs to be. ;-)

Now, there are times that manual exposure is a good idea. For example, if lighting is relatively consistent, so you can avoid metering difficulties caused by different colored clothing, lights in the frame, etc. Or, for flash photos where you may want to "tweak" the amount of ambient versus flash light in an image (and that's a subject into itself, as you don't want to expose for ambient light using a meter with a flash, otherwise you'll end up with photos without any light from the flash contributing).

But, for most purposes, using a mode like Aperture Priority can work just fine, so that you're selecting the aperture and the camera is selecting the appropriate shutter speed to insure proper exposure. That way, you have more control over things like Depth of Field, without the time involved in changing both aperture and shutter speed trying to shoot in full manual exposure (which could cause you to miss shots in changing lighting).

Then, if the metering isn't working for you as desired (for example, you're shooting a back lit subject and it's coming out underexposed), simply use Exposure Compensation to dial in a brighter or darker exposure than the camera's meter thinks is needed.
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Old Jan 17, 2010, 6:11 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC
You're probably making it harder than it needs to be. ;-)
Wouldn't doubt it. I'm the type of guy that analyzes everything so that I know why I'm doing something, and not just doing it because that's what I'm supposed to do.

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Originally Posted by JimC
But, for most purposes, using a mode like Aperture Priority can work just fine, so that you're selecting the aperture and the camera is selecting the appropriate shutter speed to insure proper exposure. That way, you have more control over things like Depth of Field, without the time involved in changing both aperture and shutter speed trying to shoot in full manual exposure (which could cause you to miss shots in changing lighting).
That's pretty much exactly what was happening to me. By the time I got the settings right, my daughter moved so much that I had to reset everything because she was in different lighting. With Av mode, is the exposure going to be correct most of the time, since the camera controls it? Also, is wasting shots the only way to tell, or is there a way to tell if a shot will be over/under exposed before you take it with Av mode?
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Old Jan 17, 2010, 6:18 PM   #14
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Exposure is going to work the same way it would if you were using Manual Exposure, only you only need to worry about one of the variables (aperture), while the camera selects the other one for you (the correct shutter speed).

If the needle is in the Center, it's going to expose it the way the metering thinks it needs to be exposed (just like Manual Exposure would work).

If you want a brighter exposure using Av mode, use a +EV setting with Exposure Compensation (which will move the needle to the right of center). If you want a Darker Exposure, use a -EV setting with Exposure Compensation (which will move the needle to the left of center).

See my first post in this thread and you'll see discussion about using Exposure Compensation with Av mode (under the bottom section discussing how the meter can do most of the work for you). ;-)

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/ne...ml#post1040356
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Old Jan 18, 2010, 3:09 PM   #15
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I'd suggest Bryan Peterson's excellent book "Understanding Exposure". It's a great overview of how aperture, shutter speed, and ISO work together to give you the correct exposure (but totally different looks/effects). Very well written with nice examples all the way through.
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Old Jan 19, 2010, 2:02 AM   #16
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My suggestion is this - pick one metering mode and stick with it. Learn under what conditions the camera will over or under expose and dial in EC if necessary.

Also, depending on what you are doing there is nothing wrong with using P mode. For a lot of my shooting I really don't care what my aperture and shutter speed are, as long as the shutter is fast enough to avoid camera shake. In those situations P mode works just fine.

For example in good light with a 50mm lens I could care less whether I use f5.6 and 1/250s or f8 and 1/125s. For those situations P mode is just dandy.

Remember you don't get any prizes for a poorly exposed photograph taken in M mode.
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Old Jan 19, 2010, 5:30 AM   #17
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Remember you don't get any prizes for a poorly exposed photograph taken in M mode.
And you don't get any special awards or become labeled a photographer by getting the exposure right in manual. I shoot in Aperture priority 99% of the time, maybe even more. I do change metering modes based on situation, but unless lighting is extremely challenging, I don't bother with manual. It's important to understand why everything works the way it does, but camera meters are very good, and there are really no advantages to shooting in manual in most cases.
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Old Jan 19, 2010, 11:04 AM   #18
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It's important to understand why everything works the way it does, but camera meters are very good, and there are really no advantages to shooting in manual in most cases.
I'm seeing this first hand. I spent a lot of time the other day in manual trying to get the shots to my liking, and I was pleased at how they turned out. However, the amount of time trying to adjust dials with a baby crawling at you full speed was rediculous and I missed some good shots. I tried again using Aperture Priority, and got some shots that were just as good, with a lot less effort.

IMO, it seems like getting a great shot in Av mode is leaps and bounds above getting no shot in M mode.
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Old Jan 19, 2010, 11:09 AM   #19
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IMO, it seems like getting a great shot in Av mode is leaps and bounds above getting no shot in M mode.


Yeah, IMO2.
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