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Old Nov 25, 2003, 10:16 PM   #1
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Default CD Backup Photos

Hi!
I have almost 2 Gb of digital pictures I shot with my Olympus C-750 camera and I want to do some backups!
I need to know how is the best way to do it... (of course I'm not going to print it all!).
I'm thinking about burning some CD but I don't know if the Brand matters, format of recording (use Nero Burning Rom soft and own a plextor 52x24x52A IDE burner).
I want to have my photos intact in a few years, so... No CDs wasted and pictures lost!
Should I burn it on ACDSee software? is it any good?
Love Andrea
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Old Nov 25, 2003, 10:41 PM   #2
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I just back them up on CDs by choosing Data CD format. I use Nero, but, any other programs should be ok. Just make sure that the CD-Rs aren't one of them cheap brands and make sure to finalize the CD when you burn it and everything should be intact.
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Old Nov 25, 2003, 10:54 PM   #3
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Hi again!
thanks for replying!
What brand (s) do you use? Sony? TDk? Moore?
Love, Andrea
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Old Nov 25, 2003, 11:00 PM   #4
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I've seen a variety of differing opinions on this subject.

Some say that CD-R's last only 3-4 years and then start to degrade so much that you risk loosing them. but I personally know others who have CD-Rs that 5 years old (or a bit more) and they work just fine.

I've heard comments about staying away from the black backed CDs.

I'm in the process of trying to deal with this too. Except I've got about 15G of pictures to burn. Almost makes me thing of using tape.

Eric
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Old Nov 25, 2003, 11:23 PM   #5
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I've seen several studies showing that they deteriorate much faster than previously thought.

The dye is apparently the key. Here's a brand recommended to me:

http://www.mitsuicdr-store.com/cgi-l...659+1086996356
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Old Nov 26, 2003, 1:48 AM   #6
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The last CDR that TDK manufactured was 16X. Since then they have been peddling whatever they can get cheap with the TDK name. Occasionally they are Taiyo Yuden but usually CMC or Ritek. They are a brand to avoid. Imation is another brand to avoid for the same reason Ė some are good but you never know.

Taiyo Yuden CDRs are consistently high quality but use cyanine dye. TY developed cyanine as the original dye for CDRs. It is the easiest to record to but only lasts a third the time of the long lasting dyes. Sony and Fuji cyanine CDRs are usually TY but always good quality.

The two long lasting dye types are Phthalocyanine and Azo. The Mitsui Gold CDRs that JimC linked use Phthalocyanine dye with a gold reflective surface which is also long lasting. Since Kodak stopped making their gold CDRs Mitsui has been the best. They are pricey though. Verbaim Data Life CDRs use their proprietary Azo dye which is supposed to be as long lasting as Phthalocyanine. The reflective surface is a silver color and the dye a dark blue, so the recording surface color is unique. The quality of the Verbatims is excellent and they are close to the Mitsui at a lower price. Both are hard to record to for burners with weak lasers. Ritek makes a Phthalocyanine based gold CD but I donít trust anything they make.

A Dutch study was supposedly released a few months ago that claimed rapid deterioration for CDRs. Only Dutch speakers have read it as far as I know. I donít know what they were smoking. I got a stack of 200 CDRs free after rebate three or four years back. They were rebranded CMC according to the ATIP, and CMC arenít the most highly thought of. I burned some audio CDs for my boat and truck changers figuring they would be cheap to replace. They have been sitting in the hot Florida sun for several years now and they all still work fine. All cheap CDRs are cyanine as are these, so they have the shortest life. I have CDRs I recorded on one of the first 2X recorders on cyanine dye that still work. Iíve never had one fail after it worked.

I do archive my photos to gold Phthalocyanine CDRs. I got a couple hundred from Kodak when they stopped making them. I burn two copies of every CDR with images. One on the gold and one on El Cheapos. They get stored in different places. The El Cheapos will get replaced as soon as there is a viable new technology. When I eventually run out of Kodaks Iíll probably use Verbatim Data Life as the Mitsuis are too pricey.

I think the secret to getting the longest life is keeping them in the dark Ė both before and after recording. The El Cheapos in my boat and car are evidence enough that heat and humidity canít do them too much harm. But light is reported to deteriorate them over time.

It is important to check the error rate too. Nero Speed does an adequate job. If the C1 error rate is high they will still play due to error correction, but it takes a lot less deterioration to make them unreadable. It is a myth that you get a lower error rate at very low speeds. Some burners do better near max speed if the CDRs are good quality and rated for that speed. They stopped putting the speed on the ATIP on the recording surface years ago. That way they can just stamp a higher speed on the box when new faster burners come out. I suspect the better companies at least test for the higher speed and probably change the discs. But I doubt the El Cheapos do. There is no regulation or standard Ė the speed is whatever they stamp on the box. So I am guessing that some of the reports of lower error rates from very low speeds are a result of poor quality CDRs. The long lasting Phthalocyanine and Azo dyes have to be written at a slightly slower speed by some burners Ė by slow Iím talking 42X rather than 52X. Not 8X!

All burners now test the surface for maximum speed. Your Plextor is fairly conservative but my Lite-Ons overestimate often. You have to be careful to check the burn speed with some burners to make sure they arenít recording faster than the rated speed of the CDRs.
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Old Nov 26, 2003, 9:13 AM   #7
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slipe

Wow, great information! Someof that I knew... some of that I thought I knew but I guess I'm wrong!

The dutch study is the one that I heard of. I actually saw a reference to it in english on dpreview, let me check...Ahh, amazing what you can find with a little poking around. Here is the original article:
http://www.pc-active.nl/toonArtikel.asp?artikelID=508

Can't read dutch to say if I agree with their testing methodologies and all that.

Here is an interesting link that generally agrees with all you said and adds a bit more:
http://www.silverace.com/dottyspotty/issue12.html

This also looks well written (haven't read all of it):
http://www.cdfreaks.com/article/91

This has been a great source of info for me years ago, but I don't know how good it is how:
http://www.cdrfaq.org/

But on to my question. I find it interesting that you suggest burning at a fast speed, not a slow one. This goes against a lot of the "conventional" wisdom (Note, I didn't say "right" wisdom.) Why do you believe this is so? I've never heard anyone claim this to be true. I usually burn in the 16x-24x range (I have a Lite-On as well) and have had generally good success

Eric
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Old Nov 26, 2003, 10:15 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slipe
The Mitsui Gold CDRs that JimC linked use Phthalocyanine dye with a gold reflective surface which is also long lasting. Since Kodak stopped making their gold CDRs Mitsui has been the best.
I've heard the same thing about the Kodak Gold CDR's also.

Gold has been increasing in price, so this is probably driving up the price of these types of CD's. Gold never oxidizes or deteriorates, which probably adds to the lifespan (when the better dyes are used, too).
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Old Nov 26, 2003, 10:26 AM   #9
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Hi!
Can you still buy those Kodak Gold Cds? I cant' find them...
Love,
Andrea
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Old Nov 26, 2003, 10:46 AM   #10
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I've been using Kodak Golds, so if they've stopped them that's news to me as well. Whatever the brand - I'd be wanting an archive life of at least 25 years and always store in a wallet in the dark away from sunlight - which is the killer. Any opinions on Dvd recordable yet? VOX
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